Frederick Douglass Worried After the Civil War that the Role of Black Soldiers Would be Forgotten in Favor of Confederate "Heroes"

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Here's my opinion: if the north could have armed slaves because slaves were the south's center of gravity then the north's problems would have been solved rather quickly. Again, what Confederate general in his right mind would have armed slaves so they could fight to keep themselves enslaved? Now, that's laughable. I'm quite sure the Confederates were not going to fight a two front war on their own turf: fighting the Yankees who had them surrounded and were closing in and fighting slaves who were right in their face. Yep, laughable. I live in Wilson County, so no reason why we can't go a county away to check out that LongHunter State Park this summer. Thanks for posting.


Yep, plenty of evidence that black slave owners existed. Thanks for posting. I think it's time for me to move on because it's quite evident that blacks were part of the war the Confederate war effort but were not in infantry. I'm not going to argue about how numbers. that's such a bore. Thanks for posting.
I have a suggestion, come down Hwy 96 & visit Fortress Rosecrans. Cruise over to Arrington & sample the wines from the porch of the winery. Across the valley the Works at Triune stretch for miles over ridge top to the north. Finish up at Fort Granger in Franklin. That is the best way I know to grasp what mobilizing slaves really looks like.

The directions are simple, stay on 96 all the way.
 
Yep, plenty of evidence that black slave owners existed. Thanks for posting. I think it's time for me to move on because it's quite evident that blacks were part of the war the Confederate war effort but were not in infantry. I'm not going to argue about how numbers. that's such a bore. Thanks for posting.
There's at least two other books that I'm familiar with that address free Blacks as slave owners in the U.S. "Free Negro Owners of Slaves in the United States in 1830," by Carter G. Woodson, where he has compiled a complete list of all alleged Free Black (including mulatto) slave owners in both the Northern and Southern states based on the 1830 Census. Woodson's list is just under 1,000 names.

Historian Larry Koger researched and compiled a list of all Mulatto and Black slave owners in South Carolina using court, tax records, collateral records, copies of deeds, the federal and local censuses, and written correspondence dating between the early 1800's and 1859 to dispute some of Woodson's data. The result of his research is published as "Black Slaveowners - Free Black Slave Masters in South Carolina, 1790-1860."
 
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