Fred Douglass Tells Women's Convention that Republicans Should Not Drop "Manhood Suffrage" Nov. 1868

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,431
Location
Long Island, NY
On November 19, 1868 Frederick Douglass addressed the New England Women's Rights Convention in Boston. Douglass had attended the the 1848 Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls and had advocated women's suffrage ever since.

At the 1868 Boston convention, led by Lucy Stone and Julia Ward Howe, a call had been made by Stone for the Republican Party to end its slogan of Universal Male Suffrage and replace it with Universal Suffrage. While there is no doubt Douglass supported women getting the right to vote, The country was only two months away from the introduction of the 15th Amendment and he was afraid that Black voting rights would be stalled over a discussion of voting rights for women.

In this thread I will offer some accounts of Douglass at the November 1868 Women's Convention. Feel free to discuss the more general issue of splitting the issue of the women's vote from that of the Black vote.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gem

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,431
Location
Long Island, NY
Woman Suffrage. Closing Sessions on Thursday Evening-Speeches by Dr. Blackwell, the Rev. Olympia Brown
More
New York Tribune
Saturday, Nov 21, 1868
New York, NY
Vol: XXVIII
Issue: 8618
Page: 5

ws1.JPG

ws2.JPG
 
  • Like
Reactions: gem

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,431
Location
Long Island, NY
The New York World was a leading conservative Democratic newspaper associated with the arch-opponent of Black suffrage Fernando Wood. It transcribed Douglass's speech, after mocking the convention:

World
Saturday, Nov 21, 1868
New York, NY
Page: 4

wsa1.JPG
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,431
Location
Long Island, NY
wsa5.JPG
wsa6.JPG

wsa7.JPG


I think that Douglass's reference to $250 worth of dirt refers to New York's requirement that a black man must have $250 in assets to vote.
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,431
Location
Long Island, NY
Now what's with abolitionists sympathizing with women's rights activists? Why did they do that?
Support for the advancement of women's rights was widespread, if by no means universal, among abolitionists. I think that there were several reasons for this:

1. Abolitionists tended to come from the reform elements within their societies. Advocating for one reform, like the end of slavery, opened them up to other reform movements.
2. Unlike many other political groups of the mid-19th Century, the Abolitionist groups were, for the most part, open to women. Prominent abolitionists like Garrison pushed to give women speaking and leadership roles within the organizations.
3. Many of the women who led the suffrage movement got their start as political actors in abolition. When they later started feminist groups, they brought along their contacts with the abolition movement, which meant that there was a great deal of interchange between the two movements.
4. Douglass had been one of the small number of men who had attended the 1848 Seneca Falls Women's Convention had he was a signatory of its declaration.
5. Many abolitionists also favored blacks getting the vote. As people who thought about voting rights an awful lot they often made the leap from Universal Male Suffrage to Universal Suffrage.
 

BlueandGrayl

First Sergeant
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
1,596
Location
Corona, California
Support for the advancement of women's rights was widespread, if by no means universal, among abolitionists. I think that there were several reasons for this:

1. Abolitionists tended to come from the reform elements within their societies. Advocating for one reform, like the end of slavery, opened them up to other reform movements.
2. Unlike many other political groups of the mid-19th Century, the Abolitionist groups were, for the most part, open to women. Prominent abolitionists like Garrison pushed to give women speaking and leadership roles within the organizations.
3. Many of the women who led the suffrage movement got their start as political actors in abolition. When they later started feminist groups, they brought along their contacts with the abolition movement, which meant that there was a great deal of interchange between the two movements.
4. Douglass had been one of the small number of men who had attended the 1848 Seneca Falls Women's Convention had he was a signatory of its declaration.
5. Many abolitionists also favored blacks getting the vote. As people who thought about voting rights an awful lot they often made the leap from Universal Male Suffrage to Universal Suffrage.
Well weren't there anti-abolition women's rights suffragists?
 


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top