Breechldrs Frank Wesson Type 1 Two Trigger Carbine Early 1863

Joined
May 1, 2015
Location
Upstate N.Y.
Franklin Wesson (1828-1899) probably the least know of the three brothers Edwin and of course Daniel whom became part of Smith & Wesson. Invented and designed many firearms in his own right. The Two Trigger Carbines were made in .22, .32, .38 & the Civil war version in .44 long RF. There were also sporting models in his products. The Type 1 was approx. 2000 pieces. B. Kittredge & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio was his agent. The US government purchased 150 pieces. The many other thousands that
Frank Wesson Ser.#1634 Two Trigger 1st type  #11.jpg
followed were purchased by the Mid-West states for their Militia's. A 24" oct. barrel, 39.5" OAL, sights 100,250 & 500yds. sling swivels, weighing 5.75 pounds. The forend is cast metal as part of receiver with a walnut stock. The .44 longRF same as used in the Ballard was only slightly more powerful then the Henry .44. The early version lacked an ejector which did not help with it's acceptance. Fingernails, knife or cleaning rod were used to unload the spent cartridge. It's longevity lasted through the Civil War and well into the Indian Wars. This piece is serial #1634 and does have the B.Kittredge stamp although very faint and hard to see. It feels like carrying a .22 instead of a Rifle Musket more the twice it's weight. Like carrying a M1 Carbine instead of a M1 Garand. The action was basically like a single barrel shotgun in that it broke open by using the front trigger to load and remove the spent cartridge case. For your enjoyment
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Joined
May 1, 2015
Location
Upstate N.Y.
Update for those with inquiring minds. I wondered about the drilled hole in the left side of the wrist. Photos that I have seen all show it. Some with reasons that do not make sense. After more searching I found the answer. See photos https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_414598 at the National Museum of American History. The carbine shown is about 300 earlier then mine. Note there is no swivel mount or cutout for one on the barrel. The forward sling swivel evidently had been mounted on the wrist, as seen in one photo. This also might eliminate the need for a sling bar and ring. So it was not a missing screw or an access hole.
 
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