Frank James (center) attending a Quantrill Reunion

Patrick H

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
10,115
#41
I don't know what's required to be a member of the SCV, but President Truman had relatives who rode with Quantrill as well as serving in the CSA.

James J. "Jim Crow" Chiles was an uncle to the president through marriage.
The President was related to the Noland Family through Francis Asbury Noland, therefore the President would have had a number of Noland cousins who rode with Quantrill, including possibly, John Noland, the mulatto who was a spy for Quantrill.

The President's wife's maiden name was Wallace, and she may possibly be related to the Wallace family who hosted some of the Quantrill reunions on their property, "Wallace Grove."

The president had a number of ancestors who were part of the original settlers around Independence, MO in the 1830's & 40's and therefore would have had very southern leanings during the rebellion.
And there you have it, my friends. Now you have read just one family connection giving you a clue to how complicated our war was out here.
The story goes that whenever political business took Harry into Kansas, his mother used to say: "Look for your grandmother's silver while you're out there."
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Oct 23, 2016
Messages
1
#42
I did some research myself and put together a book for anyone who is interested. Here is a couple of pages from that book you might find interesting. I explain who the man standing next to Frank is in the Quantrill reunion photo.
page1.png
page2.png

This is just a small amount of the information contained within my new book. If you would like to pick up a copy, I have it for sale at https://www.sweetironunlimited.com/shop/frank-and-jesse-james-in-plain-sight-book/
 

Attachments

TnFed

Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
818
#43
I have heard the story that when asked how he and his friends did their deeds during the war ...Frank James said " there is nothing in the world that is as dangerous as a nineteen year old american boy". Is this quote accurate.
 
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Messages
6,753
Location
Southeast Missouri
#44
I heard them say in a book somewhere that in WWII the most dangerous thing was an 18 year old with a gun. I would say from 1944 till the end of the war it was accurate. I read somewhere that J. Frank Dalton was found not be Jesse James by DNA.
 

TnFed

Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
818
#46
I have heard the story that when asked how he and his friends did their deeds during the war ...Frank James said " there is nothing in the world that is as dangerous as a nineteen year old american boy". Is this quote accurate.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
635
Location
Northwest Missouri
#48
I don't know what's required to be a member of the SCV, but President Truman had relatives who rode with Quantrill as well as serving in the CSA.

James J. "Jim Crow" Chiles was an uncle to the president through marriage.
The President was related to the Noland Family through Francis Asbury Noland, therefore the President would have had a number of Noland cousins who rode with Quantrill, including possibly, John Noland, the mulatto who was a spy for Quantrill.

The President's wife's maiden name was Wallace, and she may possibly be related to the Wallace family who hosted some of the Quantrill reunions on their property, "Wallace Grove."

The president had a number of ancestors who were part of the original settlers around Independence, MO in the 1830's & 40's and therefore would have had very southern leanings during the rebellion.
Maybe they are related to our Wallace ancestors.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,091
Location
Boonville, MO
#50
I heard them say in a book somewhere that in WWII the most dangerous thing was an 18 year old with a gun. I would say from 1944 till the end of the war it was accurate. I read somewhere that J. Frank Dalton was found not be Jesse James by DNA.
The Jameswere related to a number of Dalton's through the years, but in looking through the James genealogy on the Eric James website (stray leaves), I don't see any J. Frank Dalton connection. If your into genealogy, he has a very interesting site.
I think this is a case where someone saw the Dalton name associated with the James name and assumed one outlaw family was related to another outlaw family.
And Eric James is a sometime contributor to our forum
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
635
Location
Northwest Missouri
#51
The Jameswere related to a number of Dalton's through the years, but in looking through the James genealogy on the Eric James website (stray leaves), I don't see any J. Frank Dalton connection. If your into genealogy, he has a very interesting site.
I think this is a case where someone saw the Dalton name associated with the James name and assumed one outlaw family was related to another outlaw family.
And Eric James is a sometime contributor to our forum
I've found several of my ancestors on the Stray Leaves Surname index. My wife's 9th Great Grandpa is listed. I've come to the conclusion that if your ancestor came from the south and migrated to Clay County at least one generation before the WBTS, you are likely related to almost all of the other early settlers/pioneers there. I guess this means I married my cousin.
 

TnFed

Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
818
#52
I've seen that quote by Frank before, and he's right.
Thanks. The way that I worded the post was a little confusing. I know there was young men who rode with Frank James and that our boys of service age can be dangerous.lol. I'm glad you were able to figure out what I was saying. I Had hear this quote attribute to Frank James but was not sure if what I had heard was correct. Again my apologies for my post being so confusing.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,091
Location
Boonville, MO
#53
I've found several of my ancestors on the Stray Leaves Surname index. My wife's 9th Great Grandpa is listed. I've come to the conclusion that if your ancestor came from the south and migrated to Clay County at least one generation before the WBTS, you are likely related to almost all of the other early settlers/pioneers there. I guess this means I married my cousin.
I'm related to the James family going back to the 1730-1750 era in Virginia where we share at least one common ancestor, maybe a few more.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
635
Location
Northwest Missouri
#54
I'm related to the James family going back to the 1730-1750 era in Virginia where we share at least one common ancestor, maybe a few more.
Same with the wife and I. We both had ancestors at the Jamestown Colony and in Westmorland County near present day Washington D.C. I haven't isolated a common ancestor, but found evidence there was some intermarrying between families. It seems so many early Virginia families migrated first into Kentucky and Tennessee, then westward into Missouri before the war. Our folks have been here a long time, huh?
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,091
Location
Boonville, MO
#55
Thanks. The way that I worded the post was a little confusing. I know there was young men who rode with Frank James and that our boys of service age can be dangerous.lol. I'm glad you were able to figure out what I was saying. I Had hear this quote attribute to Frank James but was not sure if what I had heard was correct. Again my apologies for my post being so confusing.
No problem, we knew what you meant.
Frank James and Quantrill would have considered "old men" by most of those that rode with them. In 1863, Frank was 20 and Q was 25. Most of the members were in their teens. Riley Crawford was 13 when he joined, and he wasn't the youngest. A young, unnamed boy of 12, who went by the nickname of "Anderson's Baby" was the youngest I know of.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,091
Location
Boonville, MO
#56
Same with the wife and I. We both had ancestors at the Jamestown Colony and in Westmorland County near present day Washington D.C. I haven't isolated a common ancestor, but found evidence there was some intermarrying between families. It seems so many early Virginia families migrated first into Kentucky and Tennessee, then westward into Missouri before the war. Our folks have been here a long time, huh?
True, one of the farms I inherited in Andrew county has been in the family since the 1840's, purchased for $1 an acre. If I ever sell it, the capital gains will kill me!

Virginia families migrating through Kentucky.---in lieu of payment for their service in the revolution, many VA soldiers were given land in KY. That's how my father's family came out of VA and through KY. Maybe the James family did too. Although many of the soldiers sold their land grants to land speculators who then resold them to the settlers.

My VA ancestors came over in the 1640's or so to escape from Cromwell. I think they were on the loosing side of the English Civil War.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
635
Location
Northwest Missouri
#57
True, one of the farms I inherited in Andrew county has been in the family since the 1840's, purchased for $1 an acre. If I ever sell it, the capital gains will kill me!

Virginia families migrating through Kentucky.---in lieu of payment for their service in the revolution, many VA soldiers were given land in KY. That's how my father's family came out of VA and through KY. Maybe the James family did too. Although many of the soldiers sold their land grants to land speculators who then resold them to the settlers.
No worries, ask your accountant about stepped up basis.

I know several ancestors received bounty lands in Franklin territory, later renamed Tennessee for their Revolutionary War service. The next generation received bounty lands in the Platte Purchase Territory for their War of 1812 service. Cousin Lisa suspects our common ancestors from North Carolina might have been Tories during the Revolution. I haven't found evidence of service for either side.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,091
Location
Boonville, MO
#58
No worries, ask your accountant about stepped up basis.

...... Cousin Lisa suspects our common ancestors from North Carolina might have been Tories during the Revolution. I haven't found evidence of service for either side.
That's something I suspected and I told her, so if it's wrong, it's on me. The county in .NC they came from was heavily made up of tories. After the war ended, they moved up to southern Indiana (to escape problems from patriot neighbors?).

Thanks for the stepped up basis idea. I'm going to have the farms appraised. It would be interesting to find out their worth.
 

TnFed

Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
818
#59
I had some ancestors in NC who rode with David Fanning. They moved further west after the Revolutionary War. Think they thought it might be better for their health.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
635
Location
Northwest Missouri
#60
That's something I suspected and I told her, so if it's wrong, it's on me. The county in .NC they came from was heavily made up of tories. After the war ended, they moved up to southern Indiana (to escape problems from patriot neighbors?).

Thanks for the stepped up basis idea. I'm going to have the farms appraised. It would be interesting to find out their worth.
The best time for the appraisal was upon inheritance. Your new or stepped up basis would have been established before any inflation of value occurred after transfer. Should you sell the RE asset, you will be taxed only on the gain realized after the property was transferred to you.

The value of farmland depends on many factors, but percent of tillable acres is near the top. Check this website for similar properties. https://www.landwatch.com/Missouri_land_for_sale/Northwest_Region
 



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top