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M E Wolf

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Rickvox79,

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 1 [S# 1] CHAPTER I.
CORRESPONDENCE AND ORDERS RELATING SPECIALLY TO THE OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR FROM OCTOBER 31, 1860, TO APRIL 14, 1861.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#5
No. 53.] FORT SUMTER, S.C., February 23, 1861.
(Received A. G. O., February 26.)
Col. S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:
COLONEL: I have the honor to send herewith some slips from the Charleston Mercury of yesterday. That paper publishes everything that is calculated to bring on a collision. I do not consider the rumor worthy of the least attention, but it accounts for the increased vigor exhibited last night, and continued to-day, in pushing forward their works on Cummings Point and at Fort Moultrie. They were working at the former place until midnight last night, and a large force is busy there now on the parapet (in which openings are formed apparently for four embrasures), and in hauling up timbers from a raft. A large shed has been put up, which may be intended for a bomb-proof storehouse or a magazine. At Fort Moultrie the glacis is being rapidly extended, and it is high enough to cover their wall, as if they expected me to attempt breaching it. They are also at work this morning on the gun battery at Fort Johnson.
I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,
ROBERT ANDERSON,
Major, First Artillery, Commanding
[Inclosures.]
FEDERAL RE-ENFORCEMENTS AT HAND.
The special dispatches of the Mercury announcing that a stealthy re-enforcement of Fort Sumter had been determined on, and that Federal troops, in boats, might be expected at any moment that circumstances should happen to favor their attempt to reach the fort, were confirmed about 9 o'clock last night by telegrams received by the governor. Shortly afterwards dispatches came up from Fort Moultrie, stating that the lieutenant in charge of the harbor watch had reported that he was informed by a pilot that the steamship Daniel Webster had been seen by him off Cape Romain at noon. Notice was immediately given to the different posts. General Dunovant and Captain Hamilton proceeded immediately to Fort Moultrie; Major Stevens repaired to the Morris Island batteries. Everything was got in readiness for the expected visitors.

Up, to the hour at which we go to press (half past 4 o'clock) there has been nothing seen either of the Daniel Webster or her boats. We are very sure that the gallant troops on Morris and Sullivan's Islands will keep a bright lookout for both.

SECOND DISPATCH.
WASHINGTON February 21---6 p.m. There is the best of reason for believing that Holt designs re-enforcing secretly, by boats, at night. The re-enforcements have already been sent. You may look out for them at any moment. The programme is also to surround Fort Pickens with ships of war. That post is considered impregnable to the Southern forces. The whole anxiety of Scott and the coercionists centers now in Fort Sumter. There the Cabinet has determined that Lincoln shall find everything ready to his hand.

FORT SUMTER.--The Washington correspondents of Northern papers are continually disposing of this formidable post in divers ways. The last bulletin which we notice "settles the fact" in this summary style:

"I have just read a private letter from a citizen of South Carolina, formerly in Congress from that State, which states that Fort Sumter will be taken, at whatever cost of life, on or before the 4th of March next. The writer is himself to take part in the enterprise, and as he is also perfectly well informed in regard to the intentions of the State authorities, it may be considered that this information settles the fact, if there is any doubt of it that the fort is to be taken, and without reference to what the Montgomery government may advise or order on the subject."
-----
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 5 [S# 5]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In Maryland, Northern Virginia, And West Virginia From August 1, 1861, To March 17, 1862.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#2
RICHMOND, VA., September 11, 1861.
General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding, Manassas, Va.:
GENERAL: Your letter of September 6,1861,(*) has been submitted to the Secretary of War, who desires that you be informed that at this time it is impossible to spare the two regiments referred to from the particular service for which they are designed. Such unarmed companies as can be sent from this quarter for battery purposes at Fort Pickens and Evansport will be forwarded.
I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,
R. H. CHILTON,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 5 [S# 5]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating Specially To Operations In Maryland, Northern Virginia, And West Virginia From August 1, 1861, To March 17, 1862.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#4
HEADQUARTERS, CENTREVILLE, November 11, 1861.
Brig. Gen. W. H. C. WHITING,
Commanding Troops near Dumfries:
MY DEAR GENERAL: I have sent both your letters on the subject of a new battery(*) to the War Department with my concurrence. I look upon the case as hopeless, however; it is too late to make this additional preparation against any combined operation against Evansport. Remember that it took our War Department a month to make the mere removal of guns and a little ammunition to Evansport. If the attack you anticipate is to be made, it must be within that time. Is your position near enough to Evansport? Will not the distance, 3 or 4 miles, render it difficult for you to defend both with your force? Consider the whole question carefully before breaking ground. Would not the masked battery used on a former occasion--I mean the guns and gunners--make a useful diversion, should the proposed battery not be ready?

Captain Stevens has been very sick and I fear will not be strong enough for service for some days yet. He is our only engineer, you know. Before leaving us I shall wish him to plan such additions as may enable Fort Pickens. to be independent of the army for a few days.

I am embarrassed on the subject of winter quarters. I made arrangements a month ago for the beginning of preparations, but was disappointed by the supposed contractor, who gave. up the undertaking without giving me notice. I suppose that upon occasion, your troops could make themselves log huts in a few days. Here we can't find the logs where the huts will be wanted.
Very truly, yours,
J. E. JOHNSTON,
General.
We have just received a report from Stuart that our pickets at Fairfax Court.House have been driven in, and that a large force is gathered at Springfield, on the railroad, 7 miles beyond.
-----
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME VI, Chapter XV [S# 6]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations On The Coasts Of South Carolina, Georgia, And Middle And East Florida From August 21, 1861, To April 11, 1862.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#3
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
Headquarters, November 19, 1861.
General LEE,
Commanding :
SIR: As you have recently arrived to take command, I think, perhaps, it may be useful to you to have a general and authentic statement of the forces now in actual service from Georgetown to Hardeeville. I therefore inclose the within statement, that you may know what troops you can use for any immediate emergency.

I am not yet prepared to state exactly what regiments can be raised immediately or mustered in. I suppose you will have about 2,500 of the arms recently arrived to put in their hands and I think I can have 1,000; that is, in all 3,500. If the regiments are mustered in and get those arms, which no doubt will be the case, it will give about 20,000 men, who can be relied on, with arms. As to what you can get in an emergency from General Lawton and General Anderson, I can know nothing certain.
With very great respect, your obedient servant,
F. W. PICKENS.
[Inclosure.]
Commands. Stations. Strength.
Boyce's artillery .................................... 124
Citadel Cadets .................................... 126
Claremont troops .................................... 65
Clingman's regiment Grahamville 1,100
Celt's artillery .................................... 132
College Cadets .................................... 60
De Saussure's brigade Charleston 2,750
De Saussure's regiment Hardeeville 800
Dunovant's regiment Pocotaligo and Hardeeville 800
Edwards' regiment Coosawhatchie 600
Gonzales' siege train (four guns) Huguenin's Neck 80
Hagood's regiment Cole's Island 750
Hatch's battalion James Island and Bull's Bay 500
Heyward's regiment Hardeeville 1,000
Jones' regiment Garden's Corner. 800
Lafayette Artillery Fort Pickens (Stone) 60
Lamar's artillery Fort Johnson 131
Lucas' battalion Fort Pickens (Stone) 70
Martin's regiment (mounted) .................................... 650
McCord's Zouaves .................................... 92
Moore's artillery (6 guns) Grahamville 110
Radcliffe's regiment Huguenin's Neck 1,000
Regular artillery Fort Sumter 560
Regular infantry To be kept in Fort Moultrie 420
Vigilant Rifles Fort Palmetto (Stone) 80
White's battalion .................................... 240
Total .................................... .................................... 13,100

continued
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
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Messages
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME VI, Chapter XVI [S# 6]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Events In West Florida, Southern Alabama, Southern Mississippi, And Louisiana From September 1, 1861, To May 12, 1862.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#2
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF PENSACOLA,
Near Pensacola, Fla., November 29, 1861.
ADJUTANT-GENERAL C. S. ARMY,
Richmond, Va.:
SIR: To transmit some letters to our prisoners of war and send over the free negro in my possession to his friends I yesterday sent a flag to Fort Pickens, with a communication to Colonel Brown, a copy of which I inclose.(*) He refused to receive my communication or to reply, and only consented to take the negro after one of his officers specially waited on him to represent the urgency of the case. Fort Pickens is not seriously injured, of course, as my fire was not directed at the fort, which is ours, but at those inside of it. The armament and garrison seem to have suffered, and the commander is by no means as courteous and amiable as he was after the infliction on his outside confrere, Colonel Wilson. My lookouts report that escorts to their grave-yard, which is immediately under our glasses, are very frequent, and that two officers certainly have been buried. Yesterday a small boat attempted to enter the harbor from the fleet--a privilege heretofore accorded them, as our steamers were allowed to run freely to the yard. We fired on it, when the crew precipitately abandoned it and swam ashore, leaving the boat to float off. Some of our shots went very near the fort, but they declined the invitation. We infer they are satisfied. One of their ships (the Hartford) was towed off yesterday by a gunboat, thus proving her disability. Some operation is going on by them far up Santa Rosa Island, but what we cannot exactly conjecture. An expedition leaves to-day to ascertain.

Captain Thom's company of Marines, 100 men, leaves to-day for Virginia, by request of the Secretary of the Navy. This is the third draft made on me, and while it gives me great pleasure to discipline and instruct his men, the Secretary must excuse me for declining any longer to furnish him arms, &c. It is a depleting process I cannot stand.

As early as last spring and frequently since I have asked for some young navy officers, but without success. I have two steam gunboats commanded by landsmen. A rifled ship gun promised for one of them some weeks ago is not yet heard from. These points are of importance.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
BRAXTON BRAGG,
Major-General, Commanding.
-------------------

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME VI, Chapter XVI [S# 6]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Events In West Florida, Southern Alabama, Southern Mississippi, And Louisiana From September 1, 1861, To May 12, 1862.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#1
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, Pensacola, September 3, 1861.
Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
COLONEL: The rebels have endeavored to occupy and remove the drydock, and, having notified General Bragg that I should consider his doing either as an act of hostility, I last night ordered it to be burned, which was done.
I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
-----

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, September 10, 1861.
Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
COLONEL: Yesterday morning nine men, being the crew of one of the enemy's guard boats, deserted to this post, bringing their boat and arms. They belonged to a rebel company of marines. I have closely questioned them and obtained valuable information.

The same morning two citizens arrived here.' They have been contractors for supplying saw-mills with logs, and have staid in the country, vainly hoping to get the money due on their contract. They have been living the last eighteen weeks at or near Milton, 30 miles up the bay. They represent there being many Union men in this country, but the expression of Union sentiments to be dangerous. I shall send all North by the first opportunity.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
-----
NEW YORK, October 1, 1861.
HON. SIMON CAMERON,
Secretary of War:
SIR: At the recent cutting out and destruction of the Judah, at Pensacola, by boats from the Colorado, it is noticed that, although the boats were fired at and a considerable force rushed forward to beat them off, no gun was fired from Fort Pickens. It seems, too, that the fort could at any time have destroyed the Judah.

A large gang of mechanics are now reported finishing the steam-frigate Fulton for launching at Pensacola as a war vessel, within reach of the guns from the fort, or by the aid of those guns capable of being reached by our boats and seamen.

Colonel Brown refers to old orders to act at the fort strictly on the defensive. I beg to call your attention to this point, in order that you may see if there is not some oversight or miscarriage or change of circumstances requiring a correction of the apparent inconsistency of the navy acting offensively and the fort defensively on the same ground and at the same time, so that they cannot unite in a common object. Whether Colonel Brown already has sufficient liberty by his orders to use his discretion, or whether he needs some prompting to insure cooperation with the naval officers--often a difficult thing between Army and Navy-- r whether any other officer would be better at that place, we of course leave wholly to the Government. But we are here deeply interested that no effort of either Army or Navy be omitted to prevent privateers or steamships from being built or fitted out to prey upon our commerce besides our general interest in success, and suppose such intimations as the present, based upon distinct information which may not be so open to you, are what you wish us to make.

n behalf of underwriters, yours, very respectfully,
CHAS. B. MOORE.
[OCTOBER 6, 1861.--For General Butler's order assuming command of the Department of New England, see Series III, Vol. I, p. 823.]

FORT PICKENS, October 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General MEIGS,
Quartermaster-General:
MY DEAR GENERAL: The prediction contained in my letter to you of the 15th July(*) has been sooner fulfilled than I expected. If Barry's battery had been here not one hundred of the enemy would have left the island alive on the morning of the 9th instant.

If the companies of Barry, Hunt, and Duane had not been with so little ceremony taken from me I should have had a much better account to render than I now have; and if I had sat down and grieved over what I considered great wrongs in being so inconsiderately weakened and done nothing, instead of exerting every nerve and taking responsibilities that few under existing circumstances would have taken in sending three Zouave companies away and replacing them by two regular companies, what would now be our condition? We would have been disgracefully whipped and this fort at this moment would be closely beleaguered by the rebels----11 our batteries being lost---for I could not then have had the means of sending a man from the fort to sustain and support the batteries and to repel the invaders; and Billy Wilson's Zouaves, I am sorry to say, disgracefully ran and took shelter under our batteries.

I do not say this, my dear general, in a spirit of self-laudation, but as re-expressing to the fullest extent the opinions and fears I so fully and freely expressed at the time and for which I was so much condemned.

I must also add that in the coming conflict, which the defense of the honor of our insulted flag imposes on me, if I had these companies of which I have been deprived, and especially the officers, I should probably be able to give a better account of my stewardship than I can now hope for; but my command is in good condition and good spirits.

We have a just and noble cause, and may humbly hope for the blessing of God, which I daily fervently invoke.
I am, my dear Meigs, yours, truly,
HARVEY BROWN.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, October 12, 1861.
Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:
COLONEL: All my letters, all my suggestions, and all my requests, written and made since I have been in command of this post, having met with so mortifying, and I must add such undeserved neglect, not once having received the slightest notice, that I now only write you at any time from a sense of duty. I do so now to report that this fort, with its appendant batteries, is now as ready for service as it probably will at any future time be, and that the enemy are still erecting batteries and arming them with guns of heavy caliber, so that the relative strength is constantly changing to our loss. If I had not been confined by positive orders to defensive operations, and which I have in vain tried to have rescinded, I would open my batteries on the enemy, believing that at this time true policy and the best interest of the service and of the country demand it.

I fired the dry-dock with the hope and expectation that the enemy would open on me, but he has not yet thought proper to do so. I can therefore only patiently wait the course of events, while the strength of my command is constantly and rapidly diminishing by disease and orders.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
-----

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, October 14, 1861.
Brig. Gen. HARVEY BROWN,
Fort Pickens, Pensacola, Fla.:
SIR: The General-in-Chief directs me to say that your several communications from the time of your assuming command of Fort Pickens have been duly read to him, and such as required such reference have been laid before the War Department.

Your operations have been approved and your zeal and energy appreciated.

The usual punctuality in acknowledging your letters has been unavoidably departed from because of the incessant pressure of matters which demanded immediate attention and left no time for anything else.

The circumstances which prevented offensive operations on your part changed with your ability to assume them, the cause of the prohibition having been evidently removed by the state of active and open war which now exists.

More regular troops as well as officers would have been gladly sent you if they were to be had, but the pressing need of regulars can hardly be appreciated except by the authorities, on whom urgent requisitions are made for them from all quarters. At some posts there is not one officer to a company. The General could not give you leave of absence when you asked it or since, because he had no one to relieve you to whom he could confide your responsible command.

The Commissary-General reports that a vessel left new York loaded with beef and ice in September, and one is now preparing with live cattle, stores, and vegetables. The subject of pay for your command has been brought to the attention of the Paymaster-General.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General.


HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, October 15, 1861.
Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:
COLONEL: I have to report to you that I sent the McClellan with dispatches to Flag-Officer McKean on the 9th instant, proposing a joint attack on the enemy, to which he readily acceded, and on the 11th he, with the Niagara and Colorado, arrived here. After consultation we agreed on a plan of attack, which was to have been carried into execution to-morrow morning at daybreak. At the request of the flag-officer I had lent him two Parrott rifled guns and the steamer to carry them to the Mississippi. She returned this morning, bringing the commodore a report of the unfortunate affair at the mouth of the Mississippi, which, as you will perceive by his letter (A), renders his immediate presence at the Southwest Pass necessary; and as I am thus deprived of his assistance, I have been compelled to listen to his suggestion to suspend operations until he can co-operate with me. I need not say with what feelings of disappointment I have been compelled now the third time to forego an attack on the enemy.

I intended to have sent the prisoners taken on the 9th to New York by the McClellan, but the captain represents that he cannot take them with safety to his vessel.
I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
[Inclosure A.]
U. S. FLAG-SHIP NIAGARA,
Off Port Pickens, October 15, 1861.
Col. HARVEY BROWN,
Commanding Department of Florida, Port Pickens.
SIR: The information received by the McClellan is such as to make it indispensable that I should proceed immediately to the Mississippi. The Richmond is leaking badly, having three planks stove in below the water line by the ram. The Vincennes has thrown overboard all her guns but four. At one of the passes there is not a sufficient force to contend with that of the enemy. It is exceedingly mortifying and trying, but my duty seems plain. I ought to be there at this time. I would suggest that you defer your operations until I can assist you with a suitable naval force. The Colorado I will leave here. Lieutenant May will give you particulars as I am much hurried.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
WM. W. McKEAN,
Flag- Officer, Commanding Gulf Squadron.
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
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Messages
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME VI, Chapter XVI [S# 6]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Events In West Florida, Southern Alabama, Southern Mississippi, And Louisiana From September 1, 1861, To May 12, 1862.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#1
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, October 29, 1861.
Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General:
COLONEL: I herewith inclose you three letters which passed between General Bragg and myself. The two first were published by him in the Pensacola Observer, with a very laudatory editorial notice of him, and one not so very much so of me, in which I am accused, among other delinquencies, of being in cold blood a murderer of a sick enemy.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
[Inclosures.]
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, October 9, 1861.
General BRAXTON BRAGG,
Commanding Troops near Pensacola.
SIR: I observe this morning for the first time a yellow flag hoisted over a large building directly in front of my batteries. I also understand that officers' wives and children are in the adjoining buildings. I do not make war on the sick, women, or children. These buildings will necessarily be exposed to my fire should there be a bombardment, and, besides, they are subject under this flag to be used as a protection to any of your troops that may take shelter behind or before them. I therefore give you this notice, that the sick, the women, and the children may be removed, so that if fired on the responsibility may rest where it belongs.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
-----
HDQRS. TROOPS C. S., NEAR PENSACOLA, FLA.,
October 10, 1861.
SIR: I received late last evening your communication of that date with profound astonishment. The building on which you had for the first time observed a yellow flag has been well known to you and all your command, as well as to the United States Navy, as the military hospital of this station, and you could not help knowing that it is now used for that purpose.Dealing with one who had been an old brother soldier of high reputation, I had hoped that our intercourse and conduct in the hostile attitude in which we are placed would be marked by all time courtesies and amenities of civilized warfare; but it seems from your communication that you claim the right to violate a hospital flag because it may be abused. Admit this principle, and we revert to a state of barbarism. The sick, the women and the children, and prisoners must become the objects of vengeance; the white flag must be abolished; "booty and beauty," "rape and rapine," must follow in the track of a victorious commander. I decline your invitation to make these the objects of war. Your hospital flag has been and shall be respected. In the affair of Tuesday night your hospital with its inmates was in our possession for at least one hour, and as far as I can learn my orders to scrupulously respect both were rigidly enforced.

Our hospital and the two adjacent buildings occupied by medical officers will continue to be used for legitimate purposes. Nothing has been or will be done to attract your fire. If, under these circumstances, you should put your threat into execution, which would only be in accordance with the acts of some of your brother commanders of little experience in the customs of war, I shall take care that the facts shall be made known, that it may receive, as it will deserve, the execration of the civilized world.
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,
BRAXTON BRAGG,
Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
fort Pickens, October 16, 1861.
Maj. Gen. BRAXTON BRAGG,
Commanding Troops near Pensacola.
SIR: Your letter of the 10th instant was duly received, and I should deem it unworthy of an answer had you not thought proper to publish it to the world and to countenance an editorial in a Pensacola paper every way worthy of it.

You have knowingly and willfully misconstrued my letter, for the evident purpose of having your Christian answer published, so as to make capital with your deluded followers. You have, in the very face of my declaration that I did not make war on women, the children, and the sick, declined an invitation that I never made, and which you knew I never made, to make those the objects of war. You knew that in calling to your notice that these buildings would necessarily be exposed to my fire I was influenced by a desire to save the sick, women, and children from danger, for previously to writing the letter to which yours is an answer I mentioned to your inspector-general, who was here with a flag, my intention to do so, and then, on the spot where the batteries and buildings could be plainly seen, I pointed out that I could not fire from certain batteries of mine at some of yours without endangering your hospital, which is in a direct line with them (and this is perfectly obvious to your own sight). You therefore knew that I must either omit to fire on particular batteries of yours or it must necessarily be exposed to my fire, and yet your Christian philanthropy is such that you declare your intention of keeping your sick, your women, and your children in this dangerous situation. And for what motive but in the hope of fixing on me the stigma of firing on your hospital or killing women, children, and the sick! Your conduct shall not influence mine. I intend to prosecute this war as a
Christian man who has an account to give to his Maker. I will do my duty as I construe it, regardless of your calumny and that of the wretch who edits the Pensacola Observer.

I have had three of your officers prisoners. They have notified you that they were treated as brother officers by mine. I have had some thirty of your privates prisoners. They have, with one solitary exception (and he said nothing), in writing to their friends, declared that they were well and kindly treated, and I have your sick in my hospital, and they have also reported that they receive the same attention as my own; I have released three of your medical officers without parole. I have collected and buried your dead with the same decency as my own. I have done much more. At your special request I have for two days employed my soldiers in disinterring and carting to the wharf your dead, so that their friends might have the satisfaction of knowing their bodies were cared for, and this has been done with the full knowledge of the entirely different treatment our prisoners and our dead have received and are receiving from your hands at Manassas and Richmond. And you, knowing all this, have malignantly and falsely accused me of inviting you to make war on the sick, women, and children.

I will hold no terms of courtesy with a man who so far forgets what is due to an honorable profession, and who so well knows, yet so little practices, the principles of honorable warfare. I decline all further communications with you unless it be by verbal message and strictly on official subjects.I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
-----
Abstract from return of the Department of Florida, Col. Harvey Brown, Fifth U. S. Artillery, commanding, for the month of October, 1861.
O Officers B Aggregate killed or missing in action E Present for duty
M Men C Aggregated wounded in action. F Prisoners of war
A Aggregate present D Pieces of field artillery.
----------Memoranda-------
-------E----- -----F----
Stations O M A B C D E F
Fort Pickens, Fla. 21 709 833 4 20 1 8 ....
Camp Brown, Santa Rosa Island 12 243 370 10 9 .... 13 ....
Total in Pensacola Harbor 33 952 1,203 14 29 1 21 ....

Fort Jefferson, Fla. 10 238 330 .... .... .... .... ....
Fort Taylor, Fla. 9 190 273 .... .... .... .... 4
52 1,380 1,806 14 29 1 21 4
-----
ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Washington, November 1, 1861.
Brig. Gen. HARVEY BROWN,
U. S. Forces, Commanding Department of Florida:
SIR: Your letter of the 12th ultimo has been received and referred to the Headquarters of the Army, and in reply I am directed to transmit to you the indorsement there made upon it. You will perceive that a letter was addressed to you on the 14th of October, two days subsequent to the date of yours, which has doubtless reached you by this time, and will contain the answer to your inquiries.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
A. BAIRD,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
[Indorsement.]
HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, October 28, 1861.
This letter having been handed me by the Adjutant-General, I respectfully report that Colonel Brown's letters were all promptly communicated to the General-in-Chief as they were received. On the 14th of October a letter was addressed to Colonel Brown from this office which is believed to cover all the points in the correspondence, a copy of which was forwarded to the Adjutant-General at its date. Owing to the secrecy with which General Brown's expedition was fitted out no copies of the instructions to him are found in this office. I was not informed on a single point touching the expedition, nor have I been able to gain any information concerning Colonel Brown's orders, &c., until furnished a day or two since with a rough copy in his possession by General Meigs.
E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant- General.
[NOVEMBER 9-19, 1861.--For Secretary of War to General Butler (November 9), in relation to transportation; General McClellan to Butler (November 15), calling for reports of strength and condition of command; Butler's reply of November 18, and order suspending the embarkation of the expedition, see Series III, Vol. I, pp. 625, 646, 652, 658.]
-----
HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, ADJT. GEN.'S OFFICE,
Washington, December 20, 1861.
Col. HARVEY BROWN, U.S. A.,
Comdg. Department of Florida, Fort Pickens, Fla.:
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your highly important dispatches, as follows:
October 9 and 11, with inclosures, reporting the attack of the rebels and their disastrous repulse on the 9th October.

October 15, in relation to joint attack intended to be made by you with the naval force.

Three letters of November 25, and report, With inclosures, of December 2, in relation to the bombardment of the rebel forts and batteries around Pensacola by the fort and fleet of the United States on the 22d and 23d November.

Letter of December 3, remarking upon bravery and good conduct of officers and men of your command.

The brilliant and successful operations detailed in these dispatches have been read with lively satisfaction by the President, Secretary of War, and General-in-Chief. The General will not forget to bring specially to notice the valuable services thus rendered by yourself, your officers, and your whole command, and to urge an appropriate recognition of them by the Government.

Your suggestions in relation to armament, &c., have already been brought to the attention of the Ordnance and also of the Navy Departments. The regiment sent to re-enforce you has doubtless arrived before this, and it is hoped that some if not all the absent officers of your regular companies have also joined by this time.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
L. THOMAS,
Adjutant-General.
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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Port Pickens, December 27, 1861.
Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS,
Adjutant-General U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.:
GENERAL: Nothing of special import has occurred at this fort since the bombardment. The Seventy-fifth New York Volunteers, whose arrival I duly reported, are encamped and industriously engaged in drilling. The Sixth [N. Y.] Regiment, I am sorry to say, so far as the officers are concerned, is in a state of disorganization; criminations, recriminations, charges, and countercharges, between the officers, and especially between the colonel and two or three espousing his side and the other officers of the regiment, became of such daily occurrence, that I had peremptorily to stop it, and to notify all concerned that I would entertain no more complaints until the result of those forwarded had been acted on at Washington. I ordered a court, which is now in session, for the trial of two of the captains and some privates, and since then charges against almost every officer of the regiment have been sent me. I do not deem it expedient to exercise the authority vested in me by your letter of the 18th November, unless in marked cases, but I must reiterate the opinion expressed in my letter of the 12th October, that the good of the service requires some stringent action in reference to the officers of this regiment.

And while on this subject I desire to call the especial attention of the Department to the fact that Colonel Wilson is the next to me in rank, and if I am rendered unserviceable the command will devolve on him, and this, serious under almost any circumstances, but remote and isolated as we are, might be of the most vital consequence, and I therefore think it my duty to call your attention to it.

Some more appropriate and efficient means of unloading vessels is a subject of serious consideration. The boats we have answered tolerably well the purpose in summer when the sea was smooth, but in the heavy surf which now almost constantly prevails they are nearly or quite useless. A receiving vessel and good surf-boats are almost of indispensable and immediate necessity.

I respectfully again submit that an officer of more rank than I have should be stationed here, and I beg leave to state that, while willing to devote my whole being to' the service, I know that I cannot endure another summer in this enervating climate, and that my health and probably my life will be sacrificed by it. I have now spent upwards of fifteen years in Florida, and I require the bracing influences of a Northern climate. If, therefore, consistent with the good of the service, it will be gratifying to me to be relieved by one of the many efficient general officers now in service, and to be ordered to duty in the North.

The rebels have been for some six weeks busily engaged with a large force in putting up batteries on Oak Island, at Deer or Town Point, and are putting heavy (10-inch columbiads) guns in them, and since the bombardment they have erected a battery at the mouth of the Big Lagoon and put one or two heavy guns in it, and have, besides, greatly strengthened their existing batteries.

I have never doubted but that with three or four gunboats and 5,000 men the navy-yard at Pensacola could at any time until October have been taken, and I think the day after the bombardment, such was their panic, it might even with a smaller force have been successfully assailed, but since October they have so materially strengthened their works and erected so many batteries that I should consider an attack as hazardous without strong land and naval forces. We are now strong enough for defense (unless in case of bombardment, when we ought to have more artillery troops), and more will be useless unless a sufficient number is sent to act offensively; and this can only be done with the co-operation of gunboats of light draught of water.

I respectfully renew my application for Parrott's rifle guns and for a large supply of ammunition for those I have. I would also report that there are two 10.inch sea-coast mortars here, but no beds.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME VI, Chapter XVI [S# 6]
OCTOBER 9, 1861.--Action on Santa Rosa Island, Fla.
No. 1. -- Reports of Col. Harvey Brown, Fifth U.S. Artillery, commanding Department of Florida.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, October 9, 1861.
COLONEL: The enemy, 1,200 or 1,500 strong, landed on this island this morning, about 3 o'clock, some 3½ or 4 miles from the fort. They marched down the island in three columns, and attacked and partially burned the camp of the Sixth New York Volunteers. They were promptly met and driven by the regulars of the fort, and a small number of Zouaves, under Major Arnold, of the First Artillery, to their place of landing, and left the island under a well-directed and deliberate fire of our musketry, within good range, which must have done great execution, their boats being densely crowded. Their departure was hailed with three heavy cheers from our gallant soldiers, which were received with the most solemn silence. We have about a dozen of their dead; some 30 prisoners, including 5 officers. Our loss is, of regulars, 5 killed, about 15 wounded, and 8 missing, including I officer, Major Vogdes, who was taken prisoner early in the action; of the volunteers, 7 killed, 8 or 9 wounded, and 10 missing. I will make a detailed report so soon as I can receive those of Major Arnold and the officers engaged.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D.C.
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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA,
Fort Pickens, October 11, 1861.
COLONEL: I briefly reported to you on the 9th instant that the rebels had landed on this island, partially destroyed the camp of the Sixth Regiment New York Volunteers, and been driven off by our troops. I now report in more detail the events of the attack.

For the better understanding of the several movements it may be well to state that the enemy landed about 4 miles from this fort, (the place may be recognized on the map by three ponds and a mound); that the island there is about three-quarters of a mile wide; that a short distance below it narrows to some 200 hundred yards, then widens again, and at the camp the distance across is about five-eighths of a mile; that a succession of three or four sand ridges run on the sea-side parallel to the coast along the island, and low, swampy ground, interspersed with sand hillocks, some bushes, and a few trees, extends along the harbor side, both shores being sandy beach. Wilson's camp is near the seacoast and a short mile from the fort. The two batteries spoken of in his report, and to which he retreated, Batteries Lincoln and Totten, are, the first on the harbor, and the other on the Gulf side, about 400 yards from Fort Pickens.

About 2 o'clock on the morning of the 9th instant I was awakened by the officer of the day, who reported that a picket driven in had reported the landing of 60 men on the point. Having little confidence in the correctness of this report I directed that no alarm should be made, and shortly after he reported that the alarm was false. About 3.30 o'clock he again reported that volleys of musketry were heard at the camp of the Sixth New York Volunteers. I immediately ordered the roll to be beaten, Major Vogdes to take two companies and proceed to the spot, and Major Arnold to man the guns on the ramparts on that face. About half an hour after this time the firing was heavy and the light of the burning camp seen, and I sent a staff officer to communicate with Major Vogdes, who returned very soon, and said that he had fallen in with a large body of the enemy on the inside shore, and could not find the Major- I immediately ordered Major Arnold to proceed to support Major Vogdes with two companies, and at the same time sent an order to Colonel Wilson to advance and attack the enemy. I also dispatched a staff officer, on board the steamer McClellan, with orders for him to take position opposite the landing place and open on the enemy; unfortunately at the same time directing him to go to the Potomac, lying near, and ask for some men to assist him in case landing was necessary. Captain Powell directed him to tow his ship to the scene of action, which so delayed him that he did not arrive until after the enemy had vacated. Captain Powell acted from the best motives, and under ordinary circumstances from correct principles, but the result was unfortunate, as the McClellan could have driven the rebel steamer away, and we must have made prisoners of most of the invaders.

At the request of Major Arnold, late in the morning I sent forward a light field gun, which, however, did not reach until the affair was over.

As I propose only briefly to allude to the volunteers, I respectfully refer you to the official report, marked A [No. 4], of the colonel of the regiment. The picket of this regiment and guards sustained its principal if not entire loss, and behaved well. Captain Dobie's company, on duty with the regulars, did good service, and the captain is spoken of by Major Arnold in terms of high approbation. He had 2 men killed. Captain Bailey's company was at a battery, add not called out. He was performing his appropriate duty during the fight. Major Vogdes, with Companies A, First Artillery, &rid E, Third Infantry, proceeded beyond the Spanish fort, about a mile from the fort, when from the obscurity of the night he found himself and command completely intermingled with the enemy. He was immediately recognized and made prisoner, the command devolving on Captain Hildt, of the Third Infantry, who disengaged his command from their perilous position, and opened a heavy fire on the enemy, and finally, with great gallantry, forced them to retreat (he being ably supported by Lieutenant Seeley, my assistant adjutant-general, who volunteered for the occasion), with a loss of 11 killed. Major Arnold at this moment came up and, the enemy retreating, followed on. During this time Major Tower and Lieutenant Jackson, who I had successively sent to push forward the Zouaves, succeeded in getting some collected, and Colonel Wilson also advanced, the enemy precipitately retreating. Major Arnold, with Captain Robertson's and Lieutenant Shipley's companies, promptly followed, and attacked as they were embarking, the other companies coming up successively. Captain Robertson opened a heavy fire at short musket range on the crowded masses, and Lieutenant Shipley some fifteen minutes later joined him, and their fire must have been very effective. This was continued as long as they were within range. When they had got beyond it the gallant major ordered them to cease firing and to give them three cheers, to which no response was made. During the time of this occurrence Major Tower came up with two small companies of Zouaves, and subsequently Colonel Wilson with a portion of his regiment. When it is considered that less than 200 regulars, with some 50 volunteers, pursued five times their number 4 miles and expelled them under a heavy fire from the island they had desecrated, it will, I trust, be considered an evidence of their having gallantly performed their duty. The plan of attack of the enemy was judicious, and, if executed with ordinary ability, might have been attended with serious loss; but he failed in all, save the burning one-half of the tents of the Sixth Regiment, which, being covered with brushes, was very combustible, and in rifling the trunks of the officers. He did not reach within 500 yards of either of the batteries the guns of which he was to spike, nor within a mile of the fort he was to enter pell-mell with the fugitives retreating before his victorious arms. I have now in my possession nine spikes, taken: from the bodies of the dead, designed for our guns.

Our loss is, of regulars, 4 killed, 20 wounded (most very slightly), and 8 missing, among whom is Major Vogdes; of the Sixth Regiment New York Volunteers, 10 killed, 9 wounded, and 16 missing. The enemy lost, as known to us, 14 killed, including 1 captain; 7 wounded, including 1 lieutenant (2 since dead), and 5 officers and 22 enlisted men prisoners, and as he was known to have carried off some of his dead and probably most of his wounded, those in our hands being all severely so and unable to be removed, and as the heaviest loss is supposed to have been in the boats at the re-embarkation, it was probably three times as great in killed and wounded as I have named.

I close with the agreeable duty of naming to you the officers engaged who so faithfully performed their duty. I mention Major Vogdes first, who, unfortunately, was taken prisoner before a gun on our part was fired, to say that, as second in command and my executive officer, he has efficiently and industriously performed his duty during the whole time of my command, and his services have been very valuable.

Major Arnold, who succeeded to the command after the capture of his superior, conducted the affair with great gallantry, prudence, and ability. He speaks in the highest terms of Captains Robertson and Hildt and Lieutenants Shipley and Seeley, and indeed of all the others whose names I give: Major Tower and Lieutenant Reese, of the Engineers; Lieutenants Duryea, Langdon, Jackson, and Taylor, U.S. Artillery, and Captain Dobie, of the New York Volunteers; and it gives me great pleasure to append the names of non-commissioned officers and privates named by their company commanders for distinguished good conduct, and to recommend them to the favorable notice of the Government.

The following are the companies of Major Vogdes' and Arnold's command who participated in the battle, and (with a very few exceptions of individuals) to whom the greatest praise is due: Company A, First Artillery; H, Second Artillery, and Companies C and E, Third Infantry.

I estimate the force of the enemy at 1,200 or 1,500, having closely observed them through a fine telescope as they retreated. There were two large steamers and a barge of equal size and five or six launches all crowded with troops, and the almost unanimous estimate of the officers engaged is 1,500, from personal observation close by.
I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
CoL E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D.C.





P. S.--I have just seen the Pensacola paper, which gives their loss as follows: Killed, 21; wounded, 38; prisoners, 22, which probably is not one-fourth of the actual loss. General Anderson is severely wounded.

[Inclosure. ]
Table of distances from Fort Pickens to where the rebels landed on the morning of the 9th of October, 1861, to the intermediate points, by actual measurement, made October 23, 1861.
Yards
From Fort Pickens to Battery Cameron 580
Battery Lincoln 803
Spanish Fort 2,612
From the first place of fighting, where Major Vogdes was captured 3,331
The first pine trees 4,043
Long Point Beach 6,101
Where we first fired on the steamers 6,832
Where the rebels landed, and where they were attacked by Major Arnold, with Captain Robertson's and Lieutenant Shipley's companies 7, 306
or 4 miles 266 yards.

HARVEY BROWN,
Colonel, Commanding.
-----
 

M E Wolf

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME VI, Chapter XVI [S# 6]
OCTOBER 9, 1861.--Action on Santa Rosa Island, Fla.
No. 15. -- Report of Brig. Gen. Richard H. Anderson, C. S. Army, commanding expedition.
PENSACOLA, FLA., October 23, 1861.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the affair on Santa Rosa Island on the night of the 8th and morning of the 9th of October:

The detachments which had been ordered to assemble at the navy. yard arrived at the hour appointed, and were embarked in good order on the steamer Time. Whilst proceeding from the navy-yard to Pensacola the troops were divided into battalions, as follows:

The First Battalion, 350 strong, to the command of which Col. James R. Chalmers, Ninth Mississippi Regiment, was assigned, was composed of detachments from the Ninth and Tenth Mississippi and First Alabama Regiments. Three companies of the Seventh Regiment Alabama Volunteers, two companies of Louisiana infantry, and two companies of the First Regiment of Florida Volunteers, composed the Second Battalion, 400 strong, to the command of which Col. J. Patton Anderson, First Regiment Florida Volunteers, was assigned. The Third Battalion, 260 strong, under command of Col. John K. Jackson, Fifth Regiment Georgia Volunteers, was composed of detachments from the Fifth Georgia Regiment and the Georgia Battalion. An independent company of 53 men, selected from the Fifth Georgia Regiment, and Captain Homer's company of artillery, lightly armed with pistols and knives, carrying materials for spiking cannon, burning and destroying buildings, gun-carriages, &c., were placed under command of Lieutenant Hallonquist, acting ordnance officer. Lieutenant Nelms, adjutant Fifth Georgia Regiment, was attached to this command.

The medical officers who accompanied the expedition were: Dr. Micks, of the Louisiana infantry; Dr. Tompkins, of the Fifth Georgia Regiment; Dr. Gholson, of the Ninth Mississippi Regiment; Dr. Lipscomb, of the Tenth Mississippi Regiment, and Dr. Gamble, of the First Florida Regiment, and a detail of 20 men was made to attend on and assist them.

Arriving at Pensacola at about 10 o'clock p.m., the transfer of the troops to the steamer Ewing and the barges and flats which had been provided was pushed on as rapidly as possible, but not without some unavoidable delay. It was found absolutely necessary to employ the Neaffie to assist in towing, and at length, all preparations having been completed, the boats departed from Pensacola at a little after 12 o'clock, crossed the bay, and effected a landing at the point which had been indicated by instructions. Disembarkation was rapidly executed in good order and silence, and the battalions were formed upon the beach at a little after 2 o'clock a.m.

To effectually accomplish the object of the expedition Colonel Chalmers was directed to advance rapidly along the north beach, Colonel Anderson along the south beach, and Colonel Jackson, following a few hundred yards in rear of Colonel Chalmers, was to push his command to the middle of the island, and deploy it as soon as he should hear firing from either of the other battalions or should perceive from any other indications that the enemy's camp was approached or assailed by the other columns. Colonels Chalmers and Anderson had been further directed to endeavor to restrain their men from firing, to capture guards and sentinels, and to place their commands, if possible, between Fort Pickens and the camp of the enemy. Lieutenant Hallonquist followed in rear of Colonel Jackson's battalion, with orders to do whatever damage he could to the batteries, buildings, and camps from which the enemy might be driven.

After a march of 3 or 4 miles, rendered toilsome and fatiguing by the nature of the ground, the head of Colonel Chalmers' column came suddenly upon a sentinel, who fired ineffectually at our troops, and was him-serf instantly shot down. The alarm having been thus given, and it becoming impossible to conceal our further advance from the enemy, I ordered Colonel Jackson to push his way through the thickets to the middle of the island, and advance as rapidly as possible. The guards and outposts of the Zouaves were now rapidly driven in or shot down, and the progress of a few hundred yards, quickly accomplished by Colonel Jackson, brought him upon the camp of the enemy in advance of either of the other battalions. Without a moment's delay he charged it with the bayonet, but met with no resistance. The camp was almost entirely deserted, and our troops speedily applied the torch to the tents, store-houses, and sheds of Wilson's Zouaves.

In the mean time Colonels Chalmers and Anderson, advancing along the shores of the island, encountered pickets and outposts, with which they had some sharp skirmishing, but quickly beat them off, and joined in the work of destroying the camp. This having been most thoroughly executed, the troops were reassembled, with a view to proceeding against and destroying the batteries which lay between the camp and Fort Pickens; but daylight appearing, and there being no longer possibility of a surprise of the batteries, I directed the signal for retiring to be sounded and the troops to be put in march for the boats. At about half way between the Zouave camp and the point of disembarkation of our troops we encountered two companies of United States regulars, which had passed us under cover of the darkness, and posted themselves behind a dense thicket to intercept our retiring column, and a very sharp but short skirmish ensued. The enemy was speedily driven off, and our troops resumed their march. The re-embarkation was successfully accomplished, and the order given to the steamers to steer for Pensacola, when it was discovered that a hawser had become entangled in the propeller of the Neaffie, and that she could not move.

After some delay, from ineffectual attempts to extricate the propeller, she and the large flat which she had in tow were made fast to the Ewing. It was soon found, however, that with this incumbrance the Ewing would not obey her helm, and that a change in the manner of towing the Neaffie was necessary. While attempting to make this change the flats and barges which the Ewing had in tow became detached from her, and still further delay was occasioned in recovering them. By the time this had been done the hawser was cut away from the propeller, and the Neaffie proceeded on her way. The enemy, taking advantage of these circumstances, appeared among the sand hills near the beach, and opened a fire upon the masses of our troops densely crowded upon our transports, but without doing much execution, and we were soon out of range of their rifles. The necessity of using the Neaffie as a tug and the accident which for some time disabled her prevented her guns from being brought into play, otherwise she might have rendered effectual service in driving back the enemy who harassed us from the beach.

Our loss in this affair was as follows: Killed, 2 commissioned officers, 4 non-commissioned officers, 11 privates, and 1 citizen volunteer; wounded, 2 commissioned officers, 5 non-commissioned officers, and 32 privates; taken prisoners, 5 commissioned officers, 2 non-commissioned officers, and 23 privates. The larger portion of the officers, non-com-missioned officers, and privates captured by the enemy were the guard left for the protection of their hospital and sick and the medical officers who had remained in the building to attend to such of our wounded as might be carried there. Notwithstanding that I caused the signal for retiring to be repeatedly sounded during the return of the troops it was not heard at the hospital, and the guard and medical officers were cut off and taken prisoners.

The loss of the enemy in killed and wounded has not been precisely ascertained, but is certainly known to have much exceeded our own. From such imperfect observation as I made in passing over parts of the ground I will estimate his loss at 50 or 60 killed and 100 wounded. Twenty prisoners were taken, among them Maj. Israel Vogdes, of the United States artillery.

The destruction of property in the conflagration was very great. Large stores of provisions, supplies of clothing, camp and garrison equipage, arms, and ammunition were entirely consumed. Some arms were brought away by our men, and in a few instances money and clothing, as will be seen by the report of Colonel Jackson, and I would respectfully recommend that the captors be permitted to retain whatever private property they have taken.

It is with pride and pleasure that I bear testimony to and call to the notice of the general commanding the admirable conduct of the troops throughout the expedition and conflict. The alacrity, courage, and discipline exhibited by them merit the highest commendation, and give assurance of success in any future encounters which they may have with the enemies of our country.I beg leave to refer you to the accompanying reports of commanders of battalions and of Lieutenant Hallonquist for particulars concerning casualties, incidents, and individual instances of meritorious conduct. I inclose the report of Captain Brent, C. S. Navy, who was charged with the entire arrangements for the transportation of my command, under whose direction this important matter was very successfully managed.(*)
The report of Major Lovell, C. S. Army, chief of harbor police, and in command of the steamer Neaffie, is also submitted.(*) The members of my staff, Capt. T. S. Mills, assistant adjutant-general, and Capt. Hugh M. King, Fifth Regiment Georgia Volunteers; Lieuts. Calvin L. Sayre and Wilber Johnson, C. S. Marines, who volunteered their services and acted as my aides, rendered me active and efficient assistance throughout the whole of the operations. Captain Mills, who was with Colonel Anderson's battalion in its first encounter with the enemy, received a severe contusion in the chest from a partially-spent bull, but nevertheless continued energetically to perform his duties, and Lieutenant Sayre, while fearlessly using his revolver with effect, had his thigh bone shattered just above the right knee by a musket-ball, and, being left upon the ground, fell into the hands of the enemy. Capt. Hugh M. King, in conveying orders and superintending the destruction of the camp, displayed commendable zeal and activity, and the ardor and intrepidity of Lieutenant Johnson, while deserving especial notice, give promise of this young officer's future success and distinction.

The officers of the medical staff rendered to the wounded every service which under the circumstances was possible.
Colonels Anderson and Jackson pay graceful tribute to the memory of Captain Bradford and Lieutenant Nelms, of their regiments, to which I desire to add my respectful admiration for them and for every brave patriot who fell with them in defense of their country's liberties.
I am, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
R. H. ANDERSON,
Brigadier-General, Provisional Army.

Maj. G. G. GARNER,
Asst. Adjt. Gen., C. A., Hdqrs. Army of Pensacola.
 
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