Restricted Forrest Bust at Tennessee State Capitol.

Scott1967

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Location
England
Too many survivors for there to have been a 'massacre' at Fort Pillow. 226 POWs, another 100 taken aboard the Silver Cloud April 13, 30 picked up on April 16, 20 deserted the night before the battle, etc, etc...
You don't need to kill them all to make a point the US cavalry slaughtered whole Indian camps but left survivors you need people alive to spread the word.

People don't make Massacres up when some part of history is labelled a massacre it normally is.
 

atlantis

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 12, 2016
Too many survivors for there to have been a 'massacre' at Fort Pillow. 226 POWs, another 100 taken aboard the Silver Cloud April 13, 30 picked up on April 16, 20 deserted the night before the battle, etc, etc...
Forrest was wrong to take prisoners period. The union will had to be broken or the confederacy was going down.
 

Scott1967

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Location
England
...except when it's propaganda.
That's true but their has to be an element of truth for that to happen like I said people just don't make massacres up they are nearly always true.

I think what more than likely happened is the massacre started and Forrest and his commanders stopped it before it got out of hand but I'm sure he didn't shed any tears over it or punish those involved.

Forrest wasn't Champ Ferguson but they were not to dissimilar.

My opinion of course.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
That's true but their has to be an element of truth for that to happen like I said people just don't make massacres up they are nearly always true.

I think what more than likely happened is the massacre started and Forrest and his commanders stopped it before it got out of hand but I'm sure he didn't shed any tears over it or punish those involved.

Forrest wasn't Champ Ferguson but they were not to dissimilar.

My opinion of course.
I have no doubt there were cases of no quarter at Fort Pillow and this happened in many battles, but the myth of '300 black troops surrendered and then were shot down in cold blood' is still promoted to this day. There were only 262 USCT at the fort and at least 12 of those were white officers and NCOs.

Last night I reviewed my old notes on Fort Pillow. The black troops consisted of Companies A, B, C and D of the 6th Heavy Artillery and one section of the 2nd Light Artillery. I had found 151 survivors that were either present on the roll for April 30, 1864, or had returned to their companies at a later time. I don't think it's a coincidence that the 151 survivors and the 109 at the Memphis National Cemetery are very close to the original number of 262.
 

GwilymT

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
Yes, sadly it will be removed.
It will be removed based upon a blinkered and seemingly ignorant view of the man and his achievements.
Why is it sad that a bust put up by segregationists in the late 20th century to highlight their opposition to equal rights for African Americans is being removed, if that is indeed the case here as has been claimed? I think anyone would be in favor of removing a monument put up for such a reason.

I think that these monuments need to be taken one at a time. As @Rhea Cole mentioned, this particular monument wasn’t intended as a memorial to General Forrest but as a symbol of racism. It wasn’t erected by veterans as a remembrance.
 

Quaama

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
Location
Port Macquarie, Australia
Why is it sad that a bust put up by segregationists in the late 20th century to highlight their opposition to equal rights for African Americans is being removed, if that is indeed the case here as has been claimed? I think anyone would be in favor of removing a monument put up for such a reason.

I think that these monuments need to be taken one at a time. As @Rhea Cole mentioned, this particular monument wasn’t intended as a memorial to General Forrest but as a symbol of racism. It wasn’t erected by veterans as a remembrance.

It's sad because it joins a long and ever-growing lists of historic sculptures and monuments to be destroyed and/or removed which, as I said before is "based upon a blinkered and seemingly ignorant view of the man and his achievements."

Yes, @Rhea Cole claimed that in Post #7 but it was challenged by @archieclement in Post #14 where he said "I haven't seen any evidence it was segregationists putting it up in 1978." Well, I haven't seen any solid evidence in this thread or elsewhere and no-one seems to be bothered to unearth it. [Post #21 imay also be relevant in that regard.] People seem more interested in talking about the Battle for Fort Pillow and trying to claim that was a massacre ordered by Forrest yet there seems to be little evidence to support that claim either.

Personally, I think there is a lot to admire about Forrest (mostly from a military aspect but there were some other things as mentioned in my Posts #4, #22, and #36 in addition to those of others).
 

GwilymT

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
It's sad because it joins a long and ever-growing lists of historic sculptures and monuments to be destroyed and/or removed which, as I said before is "based upon a blinkered and seemingly ignorant view of the man and his achievements."

Yes, @Rhea Cole claimed that in Post #7 but it was challenged by @archieclement in Post #14 where he said "I haven't seen any evidence it was segregationists putting it up in 1978." Well, I haven't seen any solid evidence in this thread or elsewhere and no-one seems to be bothered to unearth it. [Post #21 imay also be relevant in that regard.] People seem more interested in talking about the Battle for Fort Pillow and trying to claim that was a massacre ordered by Forrest yet there seems to be little evidence to support that claim either.

Personally, I think there is a lot to admire about Forrest (mostly from a military aspect but there were some other things as mentioned in my Posts #4, #22, and #36 in addition to those of others).
Yet if this were indeed intended for the purpose put forward as claimed would you not want it removed? If it’s purpose for being dedicated in the 1970’s was nakedly racist would you be sad at its removal?

That is the question. There are monuments whose main purpose was to glorify white supremacy, this may not be one but it may. Also, being erected in the 1970s it doesn’t strike me as having much historical value.
 

Scott1967

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Location
England
People seem more interested in talking about the Battle for Fort Pillow and trying to claim that was a massacre ordered by Forrest yet there seems to be little evidence to support that claim either.
Quote:

Hdqrs. US Colored Troops in Tennessee Memphis, Tenn., April 14, 1864

Hon. E. B. Washburne

Washington, DC:

My Dear Sir: Before this letter reaches you you will have learned of the capture of Fort Pillow and of the slaughter of our troops after the place was captured. This is the most infernal outrage that has been committed since the war began. Three weeks ago I sent up four companies of colored troops to that place under Major Booth, a most brave and efficient [officer], who took command of the post. Forrest and Chalmers, with about 3,000 devils , attacked the place on the 12th at 9 a.m. and succeeded after three assaults, and when both Major Boothe and Major Bradford, of the Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, had been killed, in capturing the place at 4 p.m. We had, in all, less then 500 effective men, and one-third of whom were colored.

The colored troops fought with desperation throughout. After the capture our colored men were literally butchered. Chalmers was present and saw it all. Out of over 300 colored men, not 25 were taken prisoners, and they may have been killed long before this.

There is a great deal of excitement in town in consequence of this affair, especially among our colored troops. If this is to be the game of the enemy they will soon learn that it is one at which two can play.

The Government will no doubt take cognizance of this matter immediately and take such measures as will prevent a recurrence.

It is reported that Forrest will move on this place in a few days. I do not believe it. I am hurried and can write no more to-day. I am feeling dreadfully over the fate of my brave officers and men. Like all others, I feel that the blood of these heroes must be avenged. Forrest will probably try to get out of West Tennessee as soon as he can. We have re-enforcements coming in, and we shall soon be on his track. In haste, sincerely, your friend,

Brigadier General Chetlain
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Quote:

"From where I fell wounded, I could plainly see this firing and note the bullets striking the water around the black heads of the soldiers, until suddenly the muddy current became red and I saw another life sacrificed in the cause of the Union. Here I noticed one soldier in the river, but in some way clinging to the bank. Two confederate soldiers pulled him out. He seemed to be wounded and crawled on his hands and knees. Finely one of the confederate soldiers placed his revolver to the head of the colored soldier and killed him".

First Lieutenant Mack Leaming 13th Tennessee.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Quote:

number of other wounded, white and black, within a few feet of me. I heard [14] considerable firing near me on different parts of the field, and presently a rebel soldier walked past me, halted, and with a curse aimed his gun at a wounded colored soldier who lay with his head and shoulders resting against a stump, some ten or twelve yards away. The soldier begged for his life, but the next instant a bullet crashed through his brain. Another colored soldier was standing a few feet away. He had an ugly wound through his wrist, and on him the same rebel turned, reloaded his piece and aimed at his head; the wounded man, meanwhile, plead[struck: ed] for his life, and exclaiming, “de Yankees made me fight, massa.” The murderer’s gun snapped, and, as coolly as an executioner at a hog killing, the rebel brought down his weapon, jarred the powder into the tube, placed a fresh percussion cap, again took aim, and the wounded soldier joined his comrade in death. These two murders of wounded colored soldiers I saw committed the day following the battle.

First Lieutenant Mack Leaming 13th Tennessee.

End Quote

I have to add Leaming was wounded and some of Forrest's men helped him up and put him in a cabin and shut the door with some Brandy that Forrest had given his men. The shack was then set on fire and again some confederates rushed in and saved him from burning but not before half a dozen men were burned alive.

Of course this was a massacre what we don't know is if Forrest ordered it or was just compliant in it happing but he was certainly there while it was going on.

 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Quote:
Hdqrs. US Colored Troops in Tennessee Memphis, Tenn., April 14, 1864
Hon. E. B. Washburne Washington, DC:

My Dear Sir: Before this letter reaches you you will have learned of the capture of Fort Pillow and of the slaughter of our troops after the place was captured....We had, in all, less then 500 effective men....Out of over 300 colored men, not 25 were taken prisoners, and they may have been killed long before this.
"Out of over 300 colored men, not 25 were taken prisoners"

There were only 262 USCT at the fort-

HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
Memphis, Tenn., April 26, 1864.

SIR: I wish to state one section of Company D, Second U. S. Light Artillery (colored), 1 commissioned officer and 40 men, were sent to Fort Pillow about February 15, as part of the garrison.

The garrison at Fort Pillow, by last reports received, consisted of the First Battalion, Sixth U. S. Heavy Artillery (colored), 8 commissioned officers and 213 enlisted men; one section Company D, Second U. S. Light Artillery (colored), 1 commissioned officer and 40 men; First Battalion, Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, Major W. F. Bradford, 10 commissioned officers and 285 enlisted men. Total white troops, 295; total colored troops, 262; grand total, 557. Six field pieces-two 6-pounders, two 12-pounder howitzers, and two 10-pounder Parrotts.

T. H. HARRIS,
Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

-

Forrest marched off 58 black prisoners to Mississippi. 20 were at hospitals at Cairo or Mound City, IL, and another 30 were reported at Memphis. That's at least 108 survivors of the 6th Heavy Artillery. The detachment of the 2nd Light Artillery had about 20 who survived the battle. Many who were initially reported as MIA at Fort Pillow later turned up alive. Here are the records of a few of them-


William Ellis
EllisWm.jpg

EllisWm1.jpg


Hampton Gilchrist
Gilchrist.jpg

Gilchrist2.jpg


William Mullins
Mullins1.jpg

Mullins2.jpg
 
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19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Why is it sad that a bust put up by segregationists in the late 20th century to highlight their opposition to equal rights for African Americans is being removed, if that is indeed the case here as has been claimed? I think anyone would be in favor of removing a monument put up for such a reason.

I think that these monuments need to be taken one at a time. As @Rhea Cole mentioned, this particular monument wasn’t intended as a memorial to General Forrest but as a symbol of racism. It wasn’t erected by veterans as a remembrance.
The monument was proposed in 1973 and installed in 1978. This was 15+/- years after the segregation/integration controversy in the state. As far as I can tell the one who proposed the monument (Douglas Henry) was never involved in that issue.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
The monument was proposed in 1973 and installed in 1978. This was 15+/- years after the segregation/integration controversy in the state. As far as I can tell the one who proposed the monument (Douglas Henry) was never involved in that issue.
Here is a letter written by the family of Senator Henry, recommending its removal:

Dear Commissioner Eley,​
Hello. My name is Kathryn Henry-Choisser, and I am one of the late Sen. Douglas Henry’s daughters. It has come to my attention that the State Capitol Commission will be meeting on July 9th, and that the fate of the bust of Nathan Bedford Forrest is likely to be decided at that meeting. I, along with most of my siblings and a majority of the grandchildren of voting age, politely request that the statue be removed.​
As you know, 47 years ago, my father first proposed that a bust of Forrest be placed in the beautiful Tennessee State Capitol. Funds were raised, a sculpture was created, and a few years later the bust was placed in a niche on the second floor of the Capitol. I feel confident that the placement of the sculpture caused anger, disappointment, and shock to many Tennesseans in 1978. Over the decades however, we have all been made increasingly aware of the pain and anguish this statue continues to cause. I believe that this pain and anguish can no longer be ignored. I also believe, as did my father, that lawmakers are held to a higher moral standard than the average citizen, since the lawmakers’ beliefs and the laws they pass have long term legal and ethical implications for the voters they represent. So I must ask you why – in the sacred halls where laws affecting all Tennesseans are passed – is this statue allowed to remain? How can the laws be trusted, the lawmakers themselves be trusted- if the presence of a man such as Nathan Bedford Forrest is allowed?​
And, on a personal and possibly more self-serving level, it saddens me deeply to know that this statue and the abhorrent, dark history of the man depicted in it have come to be so inextricably linked to my father. I am so very proud of my father and what he achieved during his lifetime. There is so much more to my father than this bewildering bust in residence in the Capitol. He was a brilliant, articulate, well-read, witty, curious, and unfailingly polite man. He loved Tennessee, and he did so much good for the state of Tennessee and all its citizens. However, the good that my father did is being overshadowed and slowly erased because this sculpture is allowed to remain in the State Capitol. The debate that continues to rage around its tenure serves to ensure that, and therefore it will continue to eat away at my father’s legacy until this statue is removed.​
I offer you a story. Mary Johnson, an African-American woman, lived with my parents and oversaw their care for the last 9 to 10 years of their lives. During this time, she became an integral part of our family. My father and Ms. Johnson developed an unshakeable connection. She called him “Papa”, just like me & my siblings, and she confronted him on certain issues that the rest of us were too hesitant to talk to him about. He respected Mary, but more importantly, he loved her. I know that Mary helped alter and expand some of my father’s beliefs over the course of their friendship. I believe that if Mary had looked my father in the eye and explained to my father, in her own words, why the statue needed to be removed – and if she asked him to take it down – he would have tried to make it happen.​
So, for Mary Johnson, for my family, and for all the citizens of Tennessee who feel regret, pain, anger, frustration, (or, like me, utter shame) upon seeing these kinds of statues & memorials – and to honor the distinguished legacy of my father- please remove the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest from the Tennessee State Capitol.​
While I will always consider Nashville, Tennessee to be my “home”, I currently live in Richmond, Virginia, where the Confederate statues are literally being ripped from their pedestals. The Civil War ended 155 years ago. These Confederate statues have had their long and selfish moment. The energy spent trying to keep these statues in place is simply another “lost cause”. The Confederate sculptures, including the bust of Nathan Bedford Forrest, serve no purpose but to sow division, cause harm, and prevent deep wounds from healing. If some people are worried that history is being erased, well – that is what museums and history books are for. Meanwhile, the nation and the world are watching to see what decisions people in positions of power are making to effect meaningful change within the systems that continue to oppress people of color.​
Our father loved the State of Tennessee in a deep and enduring way. During his 44 years as a State Senator, his profound love of Tennessee and Tennesseans provided the foundation of his deliberations when deciding how he should vote. He would consider the views of the people he represented. He would consider his personal beliefs. Many factors would be weighed and processed, and the scales would tip one way or the other – aye or nay. Ultimately, he would ask himself and his fellow lawmakers: does this decision benefit the state of Tennessee?​
My siblings and I have debated the following question recently: would our father see the continued presence of the bust of Forrest as a benefit to the state of Tennessee? My brother Bob wrote to me, in a manner reminiscent of our late father, that he believes that our father would “concede posthumously, to its dismissal from the Capitol Building.” We, the undersigned, agree. Thank you for your time and for considering our request. May justice and goodness prevail at the State Capitol Commission meeting on July 9th.​
Kathryn C. Henry-Choisser​
On behalf of and with the knowledge and consent of:​
Lolly Henry Hickey​
Robert S. Henry​
Mary Leland Henry Wehner​
Marty R. Clark​
Corinne McMahon Cook​
Sarah Kathryn Thompson​
Henry F. Choisser​
Camille L. Kinloch​
Leland C. Henry​
Samuel R. Henry​
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
It wasn't only black soldiers that were massacred at Fort Pillow. White officers associated with black units were also massacred. As well as black civilians.

On the second day, when confederates came back, they only killed wounded blacks.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Here is a letter written by the family of Senator Henry, recommending its removal:

Dear Commissioner Eley,​
Hello. My name is Kathryn Henry-Choisser, and I am one of the late Sen. Douglas Henry’s daughters. It has come to my attention that the State Capitol Commission will be meeting on July 9th, and that the fate of the bust of Nathan Bedford Forrest is likely to be decided at that meeting. I, along with most of my siblings and a majority of the grandchildren of voting age, politely request that the statue be removed.​
As you know, 47 years ago, my father first proposed that a bust of Forrest be placed in the beautiful Tennessee State Capitol. Funds were raised, a sculpture was created, and a few years later the bust was placed in a niche on the second floor of the Capitol. I feel confident that the placement of the sculpture caused anger, disappointment, and shock to many Tennesseans in 1978. Over the decades however, we have all been made increasingly aware of the pain and anguish this statue continues to cause. I believe that this pain and anguish can no longer be ignored. I also believe, as did my father, that lawmakers are held to a higher moral standard than the average citizen, since the lawmakers’ beliefs and the laws they pass have long term legal and ethical implications for the voters they represent. So I must ask you why – in the sacred halls where laws affecting all Tennesseans are passed – is this statue allowed to remain? How can the laws be trusted, the lawmakers themselves be trusted- if the presence of a man such as Nathan Bedford Forrest is allowed?​
And, on a personal and possibly more self-serving level, it saddens me deeply to know that this statue and the abhorrent, dark history of the man depicted in it have come to be so inextricably linked to my father. I am so very proud of my father and what he achieved during his lifetime. There is so much more to my father than this bewildering bust in residence in the Capitol. He was a brilliant, articulate, well-read, witty, curious, and unfailingly polite man. He loved Tennessee, and he did so much good for the state of Tennessee and all its citizens. However, the good that my father did is being overshadowed and slowly erased because this sculpture is allowed to remain in the State Capitol. The debate that continues to rage around its tenure serves to ensure that, and therefore it will continue to eat away at my father’s legacy until this statue is removed.​
I offer you a story. Mary Johnson, an African-American woman, lived with my parents and oversaw their care for the last 9 to 10 years of their lives. During this time, she became an integral part of our family. My father and Ms. Johnson developed an unshakeable connection. She called him “Papa”, just like me & my siblings, and she confronted him on certain issues that the rest of us were too hesitant to talk to him about. He respected Mary, but more importantly, he loved her. I know that Mary helped alter and expand some of my father’s beliefs over the course of their friendship. I believe that if Mary had looked my father in the eye and explained to my father, in her own words, why the statue needed to be removed – and if she asked him to take it down – he would have tried to make it happen.​
So, for Mary Johnson, for my family, and for all the citizens of Tennessee who feel regret, pain, anger, frustration, (or, like me, utter shame) upon seeing these kinds of statues & memorials – and to honor the distinguished legacy of my father- please remove the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest from the Tennessee State Capitol.​
While I will always consider Nashville, Tennessee to be my “home”, I currently live in Richmond, Virginia, where the Confederate statues are literally being ripped from their pedestals. The Civil War ended 155 years ago. These Confederate statues have had their long and selfish moment. The energy spent trying to keep these statues in place is simply another “lost cause”. The Confederate sculptures, including the bust of Nathan Bedford Forrest, serve no purpose but to sow division, cause harm, and prevent deep wounds from healing. If some people are worried that history is being erased, well – that is what museums and history books are for. Meanwhile, the nation and the world are watching to see what decisions people in positions of power are making to effect meaningful change within the systems that continue to oppress people of color.​
Our father loved the State of Tennessee in a deep and enduring way. During his 44 years as a State Senator, his profound love of Tennessee and Tennesseans provided the foundation of his deliberations when deciding how he should vote. He would consider the views of the people he represented. He would consider his personal beliefs. Many factors would be weighed and processed, and the scales would tip one way or the other – aye or nay. Ultimately, he would ask himself and his fellow lawmakers: does this decision benefit the state of Tennessee?​
My siblings and I have debated the following question recently: would our father see the continued presence of the bust of Forrest as a benefit to the state of Tennessee? My brother Bob wrote to me, in a manner reminiscent of our late father, that he believes that our father would “concede posthumously, to its dismissal from the Capitol Building.” We, the undersigned, agree. Thank you for your time and for considering our request. May justice and goodness prevail at the State Capitol Commission meeting on July 9th.​
Kathryn C. Henry-Choisser​
On behalf of and with the knowledge and consent of:​
Lolly Henry Hickey​
Robert S. Henry​
Mary Leland Henry Wehner​
Marty R. Clark​
Corinne McMahon Cook​
Sarah Kathryn Thompson​
Henry F. Choisser​
Camille L. Kinloch​
Leland C. Henry​
Samuel R. Henry​
I see nothing in this letter that Henry was motivated by a "pro-segregationist" viewpoint (which is what I replied to). By 1978, that issue had long been settled. It's rather obvious that Henry-Choisser believes all the nonsense that is claimed about Forrest. Monuments, sculptures, etc, should not be removed based on false claims.
 

Scott1967

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Location
England
Forrest marched off 58 black prisoners to Mississippi. 20 were at hospitals at Cairo or Mound City, IL, and another 30 were reported at Memphis. That's at least 108 survivors of the 6th Heavy Artillery. The detachment of the 2nd Light Artillery had about 20 who survived the battle. Many who were initially reported as MIA at Fort Pillow later turned up alive. Here are the records of a few of them-
According to who?.

I give you eyewitness accounts you give me 4-5 slips where are the rest?.

I do know their are some confederate accounts of the massacre in letters written by confederate soldiers which confirms what 1st lieutenant Leaming account if I find them ill post them.

You also have to look at how many Confederate soldiers were killed in the assaults only 14 compared to the 250+ Union troops this dis proportionate number sort of gives you a huge hint that Union resistance was not what happened and in fact the fort was taken with relative ease.

Quote:

Despite the initial arguments of Confederates—and the continued insistence of Forrest’s apologists—proclaiming that no massacre had occurred, evidence to the contrary is simply too overwhelming. While not as overblown as the arguments put forward by Wade and Gooch, the interpretations of the vast majority of modern historians convincingly show that a massacre took place. Twice as many Union soldiers were killed during the battle than were wounded—an inverse ratio for Civil War battles. Moreover, only 20 percent of the Black soldiers present were taken prisoner, while roughly 60 percent of the white troops present were captured.

End Quote:

We will never know if Forrest was directly responsible for the massacre or just compliant , The fact remains he was there in person and in command and instead of telling the truth that his troops got out of hand he decides to protect them by denying the massacre even took place and while I admire his loyalty to his troops the fact that some were cold blooded murderers never seems to cross his mind.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Here's a confederate eyewitness account of the massacre:

The Slaughter was awful. Words cannot describe the scene. The poor deluded negros would run up to our men fall upon their knees and with uplifted hands scream for mercy but they were ordered to their feet and then shot down. The whitte men fared but little better. Their fort turned out to be a great slaugter pen–blood–human blood stood about in pools and brains could have been gathered up in any quantity. I with several others tried to stop the butchery and at one time had partially succeeded. but Gen. Forrest ordered them shot down like dogs. and the carnage continued — Finally our men became sick of blood and the firing ceased.​
Achilles V. Clark, Twentieth Tennessee Cavalry​
Forrest's men claimed to have buried 450 bodies. Forrest wrote Jefferson Davis that "in troops, Negroes, and citizens, the killed, wounded and drowned will range from 450 to 500." Forrest also claimed to captured "about 40 Negro women and children."
 
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DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
In his book, Confederate Rage, Yankee Wrath: No Quarter in the Civil War, George S Burkhardt writes that "about 180 black soldiers and their officers fell during the slaughter."

What other instance of either side in the Civil War slaughtering the prisoners and the wounded comes even close to that?
 

GwilymT

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
The monument was proposed in 1973 and installed in 1978. This was 15+/- years after the segregation/integration controversy in the state. As far as I can tell the one who proposed the monument (Douglas Henry) was never involved in that issue.
I’m not the one who made the claim. My question only was that if white supremacy and segregation were demonstrated to be the purpose of this monument would you still support it?

I think I know where certain people will fall.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Forrest's men claimed to have buried 450 bodies. Forrest wrote Jefferson Davis that "in troops, Negroes, and citizens, the killed, wounded and drowned will range from 450 to 500." Forrest also claimed to captured "about 40 Negro women and children."
Did you not see post #90?- https://civilwartalk.com/threads/forrest-bust-at-tennessee-state-capitol.183282/page-5#post-2389073

Surgeon Fitch, 13th Tennessee Cavalry: "...the women, children, and most of the Citizens of the Fort, had got into a Coal Barge, and were towed by Gun Boat, No. 7, Up the River, above the mouth of Coal Creek." According to the log of the New Era this was at 8:15 a.m.

Something strange about that Achilles V. Clark letter - it has no signature.
 
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