Forgotten Forts Series Index

NFB22

Sergeant Major
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Jun 21, 2012
Location
Louisville, KY
If y'all do make a forum, make sure you include my Earthworks and Fortifications thread :wink:
http://civilwartalk.com/threads/earthworks-and-fortifications.85769/

If the forum was made I would be glad to see your thread put in there AUG351. I think this part of the war is sort of thrown to the wind in light of the Gettysburgs, Shilohs, and Antietams of the war and people often forget all the forts and sieges involved between 61 and 65. Mostly forgotten yet none the less important is why I sort of started this series. There is a TON of history involved yet most has been either not discussed or simply forgotten.
 

NFB22

Sergeant Major
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Jun 21, 2012
Location
Louisville, KY
Exactly, many do not understand the impact earthworks and fortifications had during the war and throughout history. Some out there think that earthworks and trenches only came into use during WW1, which is completely false. Earthworks have been in use since ancient times and so have forts. The role they played during the Civil War was major, earthworks thrown up on the field or a fort or series of fortifications could deeply impact a commander's decision. Earthworks and fortifications changed the course of many a battle and helped hold back thousands of men, aiding in the destruction of some of the best armies during the war.

Fortifications were nothing new. Not only we had we seen them in previous U.S. wars (American Revolution, War of 1812, Mexican-American War) but even Julius Caesar used them. One of the most unusual use of fortifcations can be found in the Battle/Siege of Alesia. Caesar used one row of fortifications to keep the fortified Gallic tribes in Alesia under siege and faced another set of fortifications outward to keep relieving forces at bay.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Alesia

They played an important part in the American Civil War I dont care what people say.
 

Nathanb1

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Admittedly, many of the ones we're looking at in the West weren't your typical "fortification," but boy did they affect history! (Fort Mason would be one of those examples....a virtual who's who!). And as supply depots and "home" for troops, they were vital in these long distances among hostile Indians.

I like forts.
 

NFB22

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Location
Louisville, KY
Admittedly, many of the ones we're looking at in the West weren't your typical "fortification," but boy did they affect history! (Fort Mason would be one of those examples....a virtual who's who!). And as supply depots and "home" for troops, they were vital in these long distances among hostile Indians.

I like forts.

Many of the forts or "posts" in the west weren't your "traditional" posts that had walls but had an influence all the same. If they were worthless then why would either side during the war contest them or want to garrison them. The bottom line is they were often located in key terrain and built to defend key terrain features or "choke points" and could house military forces in safer more defensible positions rather than just bivouacking a military force in open ground. Many times these posts had a big impact during various campaigns. For instance see the Union forts or "posts" involved during Sibley's New Mexico Campaign.
 
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NFB22

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Location
Louisville, KY
New Post
http://civilwartalk.com/threads/forgotten-forts-series-fort-frederick.78543/

In looking over these forts for a new place to put them I found I had failed to include this one in the Index so I am doing so now.

Fort Frederick is located near Big Pool, Maryland. Built on the Potomac River it guarded river crossings and nearby canals and railroads. A small skirmish took place nearby in late 1861.
 
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