Forgotten Forts Series - Fort Taber

NFB22

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Location
Louisville, KY
Fort Taber, later known as Fort Rodman, is a Third System granite fortification located near New Bedford, Massachusetts and the mouth of the Acushnet River. The three tiered fort which may look similar to Fort Gorges in Maine was one of a group of forts begun in the time period to protect the New England coast.
2021_1fort_taber.jpg

Construction of the fort began in late 1857/early 1858 and progressed as quickly as granite could be shipped to the site. The fort was made up of two casemated tiers with a Barrbette tier on top. At the outbreak of the Civil War the fort was not completed enough to be garrisoned or armed. With the fear of Confederate raiders along this portion of the coast a temporary earthwork fortification was built in front of the partially completed fort. This earthwork fort was named Fort Taber after the city mayor Isaac Taber and was armed while the granite fort could be completed.

In 1863 the fort was completed to the point that it could be used and the earthworks were abandoned and destroyed. The garrison and its artillery were then moved to the granite fortification which had not been officially named at that point. This fort also became known as Fort Taber. The fort would remain in use throughout the end of the war however it would see no action during the Civil War.
Fort Taber.jpg

Following the war construction on the fort continued through 1871 when work was suspended. During this time a lighthouse and quarters were built on the fort. Before the turn of the century the military reservation was named Fort Rodman after local William Rodman who served as a Lt Colonel in the Union Army and was killed during the Siege of Port Hudson in 1863. Throughout the early 1900s up through World War II the site was built up with new Endicott period fortifications as well as other buildings. However in the years following WWII the site was declared surplus and thus ended its military use.
2019_1fort_taber_birdseye.jpg

Today the site is known as Fort Taber City Park which is open to the public. The site plays host to many reenactments from different periods of military history. The Third System fort itself is not open to the public on a regular basis however the park does house the Fort Taber-Fort Rodman Museum and visitors are able to tour other batteries and fortifications that came after the original fort.

Be sure to check out all other "forgotten forts" in the Forgotten Forts Series Index (Link Below)
http://www.civilwartalk.com/threads/forgotten-forts-series-index.80901/
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
Ft. Beauregard at Harrisonburg, LA., is a forgotten fort. It was built on and in a ring of hills on the Ouchitia River. It had a small 100-300 man garrison at different times. It was the only thing that kept Monroe and the rest of northeast Louisiana from falling into Federal hands. The picture depicts the landward side were there were mainly rife pits and breastworks. The opposite side, which would be to the viewer's left is a strong system of earthworks were the main battery covered the river.
Our unit just re-started an annual reenactment there; seeing as how the entire original garrison in from our home town. We rebuilt some of the breast works as you can see in the photo. Originally, they would have extended up and around that hill in the background, forming a giant ring.
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Sbc

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Location
Easley, South Carolina
Fort Taber, later known as Fort Rodman, is a Third System granite fortification located near New Bedford, Massachusetts and the mouth of the Acushnet River. The three tiered fort which may look similar to Fort Gorges in Maine was one of a group of forts begun in the time period to protect the New England coast.
View attachment 58965
Construction of the fort began in late 1857/early 1858 and progressed as quickly as granite could be shipped to the site. The fort was made up of two casemated tiers with a Barrbette tier on top. At the outbreak of the Civil War the fort was not completed enough to be garrisoned or armed. With the fear of Confederate raiders along this portion of the coast a temporary earthwork fortification was built in front of the partially completed fort. This earthwork fort was named Fort Taber after the city mayor Isaac Taber and was armed while the granite fort could be completed.

In 1863 the fort was completed to the point that it could be used and the earthworks were abandoned and destroyed. The garrison and its artillery were then moved to the granite fortification which had not been officially named at that point. This fort also became known as Fort Taber. The fort would remain in use throughout the end of the war however it would see no action during the Civil War.
View attachment 58968
Following the war construction on the fort continued through 1871 when work was suspended. During this time a lighthouse and quarters were built on the fort. Before the turn of the century the military reservation was named Fort Rodman after local William Rodman who served as a Lt Colonel in the Union Army and was killed during the Siege of Port Hudson in 1863. Throughout the early 1900s up through World War II the site was built up with new Endicott period fortifications as well as other buildings. However in the years following WWII the site was declared surplus and thus ended its military use.
View attachment 58969
Today the site is known as Fort Taber City Park which is open to the public. The site plays host to many reenactments from different periods of military history. The Third System fort itself is not open to the public on a regular basis however the park does house the Fort Taber-Fort Rodman Museum and visitors are able to tour other batteries and fortifications that came after the original fort.

Be sure to check out all other "forgotten forts" in the Forgotten Forts Series Index (Link Below)
http://www.civilwartalk.com/threads/forgotten-forts-series-index.80901/
Last time I visited was the early 80's and it was in bad shape.
 
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