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History Foods for St. Patrick's Day

Discussion in 'Foods of the Civil War' started by donna, Mar 11, 2013.

  1. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    March 17th will be St. Patrick's Day, so thought would post some history and some foods.

    St. Patrick was born near Dumbarton, Scotland in 387 A.D. When he was 16, he was captured by Irish marauders and sold as a slave to a Druid chief in Ireland. He worked for six years as a swineherd and mastered the Celtic language, He then escaped back to Scotland.

    He entered religious life at the monastery of St. Martin at Tours, France. He stayed there eighteen years, becoming a priest and then a bishop. Pope Celestine I, named him Patricius and sent him to Ireland in 432. He eventually converted the Druid who originally owned him and converted many to Christianity. The shamrock evolved as the national symbol of Ireland because Patricius used it to illustrate the concept of the Holy Trinity. He died on March 17, 463 (or 465) A.D.

    St. Patrick's day has been celebrated for hundreds of years. In Savannah, Georgia the Hibernian Society has been keeping St. Patrick's Day since 1812. It is one of the South's most notable. A Savannah Irish dinner characterizes the simplicity of traditional Irish food. Potatoes and Soda Bread are always served.


    Irish Soda Bread Recipe

    1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
    2 teaspoons baking soda
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1/4 cup butter, softened
    3 cups whole wheat flour
    1 2/3 cups buttermilk

    Sift together all purpose flour, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Cut in butter with a pastry blender until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in whole wheat flour, mixing well. Add buttermilk, stirring until the dry ingredients are thoroughly moistened.

    Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead about 5 minutes. Shape dough into a round loaf; place on a greased baking sheet. Using a sharp knife, cut a cross 1/4 inch deep on the top of loaf; lightly sprinkle cross with flour.

    Bake at 400 degrees for 40 minutes or until bread sounds hollow when tapped. Remove from baking sheet, and cool completely on wire rack.

    From: "The Southern Heritage Celebrations Cookbook", Oxmoor House, Birmingham. Alabama,1983.
     

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  3. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Colcannon Potatoes

    12-16 Servings

    Ingredients:

    2 pounds cabbage, shredded
    2 cups water
    4 pounds potatoes, peeled and quartered
    2 cups milk
    1 cup chopped green onions
    Salt and coarsely ground pepper to taste
    1/4 cup butter, melted
    Crumbled cooked bacon and minced fresh parsley

    Directions

    In a large saucepan, bring cabbage and water to a boil. Reduce heat;
    cover and simmer for 10-12 minutes or until tender. Drain, reserving
    cooking liquid. Keep cabbage warm.

    Place cooking liquid and potatoes in a large saucepan; add enough
    additional water to cover the potatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce
    heat; cover and cook for 15-17 minutes or until tender. Drain and
    keep warm.

    In a small saucepan, bring milk and onions to a boil; remove from the
    heat. In a large bowl, mash potatoes. Add milk mixture; beat until
    blended. Beat in the cabbage, salt and pepper. Drizzle with the
    melted butter, bacon and parsley.

    © Taste of Home 2012
     
  4. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Another delicious Irish dish.

    Irish Tea Brack

    1/2 cup dried peaches, chopped
    1/2 cup dried apricots, chopped
    1/2 cup dried prunes, chopped
    1 cup hot, strong tea
    1 cup sugar
    1 egg, beaten
    1 tablespoon orange marmalade
    1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
    1 3/4 cups self-rising flour
    butter

    Combine dried fruit and tea in a large bowl; cover and let stand overnight.

    Add next 3 ingredients to fruit mixture; stir well. Gradually add flour, mixing well.

    Spoon batter into a greased 9-inch square pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Serve with butter, if desired. Serves 8 to 10.

    From: "The Southern Heritage Celebrations Cookbook".
     
  5. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Guinness Stout Chocolate Cake

    Adapted from the Barrington Brewery in Great Barrington, MA via Bon Appetit

    1 cup stout
    1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
    3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder (preferably Dutch-process)
    2 cups all purpose flour
    2 cups sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    2 large eggs
    2/3 cup sour cream
    6 ounces good semisweet chocolate chips
    6 tablespoons heavy cream
    3/4 teaspoon instant coffee granules

    Cake prep:
    Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter or spray a bundt pan well; make sure you get in all of the nooks and crannies. (Some people even go so far as to brush the inside of their bundt pans with melted butter–you cannot be too careful!). Bring 1 cup stout and 1 cup butter to simmer in heavy large saucepan over medium heat. Add cocoa powder and whisk until mixture is smooth. Cool slightly.

    Whisk flour, sugar, baking soda, and 3/4 teaspoon salt in large bowl to blend. Using electric mixer, beat eggs and sour cream in another large bowl to blend. Add stout-chocolate mixture to egg mixture and beat just to combine. Add flour mixture and beat briefly on slow speed. Using rubber spatula, fold batter until completely combined. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake cake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 35 minutes. Transfer cake to rack; cool completely in the pan, then turn cake out onto rack for drizzling ganache.

    Ganache:
    For the ganache, melt the chocolate, heavy cream, and coffee in the top of a double boiler over simmering water until smooth and warm, stirring occasionally. Drizzle over the top of cooled cake.

    From: Smitten Kitchen
    (smittenkitchen.com)

    I can say I've made this and it is one RICH cake. As noted on the site, it can be doubled for 3 8" rounds and regular icing used. Very good! (Especially with a little Irish coffee! :wink: )
     
  6. Dave Hull

    Dave Hull First Sergeant

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    Lori's birthday is St Patrick's day. I would like to make her a traditional mutton stew to celebrate her birthday and Irish roots, but have not had much luck with the mutton. I could use lamb, but it is not the same. I am heading out to a Halal market to see if I have any better luck.

    From my time in Ireland, I will share what a few folks told me "Dave, you eat breakfast and drink Guinness while you are here. Do not bother yourself with any other meals."

    My favorite traditional Irish dish is smoked salmon from The Dingle.
     
  7. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Indeed, mutton is much stronger and has a distinct taste that many find distasteful. However, properly prepared the older sheep is pretty good! You may well have better luck at a Halal butcher. Most out here deal with lamb only - not a lot of call for mutton. We eat mutton stew sometimes but make it just like the beef stew - same ingredients but more chilies!
     
  8. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Happy Birthday to Lori.

    I have a recipe for lamb stew but you could use mutton. As diane states in her post some feel mutton too strong.
     
  9. Dave Hull

    Dave Hull First Sergeant

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    Thank you all, I will pass along the birthday wishes. The key to a good mutton stew is time. Bottle of red wine, carrots, onion, celery, little garlic, salt, pepper, cumin one can each beef and chicken stock, two bay leaves, couple of tomatoes, bring to boil, reduce to simmer and cook for 6 hours. Toss in a few nips and tatties when the meat becomes tender. The long cooking time and the red wine cut the mutton taste considerably, which most find inedible. Lamb is OK as a substitute, but I think it fades too much with a full bottle of wine and a six hour simmer.

    I think I would go with goat before lamb, but would have to cut the wine and cooking time way back as goat is a more delicate flavor than lamb. Lori would never eat it though, she loves goats.
     
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  10. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Goats - they can be delicious, though, but I'd have trouble eating one!

     
  11. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Corned Beef Dinner

    1 (4 to 5 pound) corned beef brisket, trimmed
    2 bay leaves
    1 1/2 teaspoons whole cloves
    1 1/2 teaspoons whole peppercorns
    1 medium cabbage, cut into wedges
    6 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
    6 medium carrots, scraped and cut into julienne strips
    4 medium onions, peeled and quartered
    fresh parsley sprigs

    Place brisket in a large Dutch oven; cover with water. Add spices. Bring to a boil and cover; reduce heat and simmer for 2 1/2 hours or until brisket is tender.

    Add cabbage; cover and simmer 10 minutes. Add potatotes, carrots and onions; cover and simmer an additional 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

    Remove brisket to a warm platter; slice thinly across the grain. Remove the vegetables from liquid, discarding spices; place on platter with sliced brisket. Garnish with parsley. Serves 8 to 10.
     
  12. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Hot Irish, a great St. Patrick's Day Beverage

    1 cup hot water
    2 1/2 tablespoons Irish whiskey
    1 teaspoon brown sugar
    1 lemon slice studded with cloves

    Combine all ingredients in a mug, stirring well. Serve at once.
     
  13. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Will be having corned beef and cabbage on Sunday, St. Patrick's Day.

    Just decided to bring this up as tomorrow is the Day for wearing the Green.
     
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  14. Littlestown

    Littlestown Captain Trivia Game Winner

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    My corned beef is in the oven now. Yum!
     
  15. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

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    Trust me. You wouldn't :smile:

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. John Hartwell

    John Hartwell Captain Forum Host

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    When my gt-grandmother, Margaret Joyce came over from Ireland in the '50s, she was 80+ years old. All 6 of her children were here, and all their offspring. One of the things that disgusted her about America (and there were many) was that her children were eating corned beef & cabbage on St. Pat's day, and calling it Irish. "We never heard of corned beef in Connemara, & we raised cabbage only to feed the pigs!"

    Maybe the dish was known in some parts of Ireland, but not in West Connacht. Lamb, pork and fish were the principal proteins.

    She had also told them she had sold the farm before coming. It took about 6 months before she was packing to go home -- she had only leased the farm to the hired man, and had never had any intention of staying. She died at age 95.

    Hilaritas!

    jno
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
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  17. Mark F. Jenkins

    Mark F. Jenkins Lt. Colonel

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    Well, we just had corned beef, some Irish cheese, and potatoes. (No cabbage, though-- we'd never get the kids anywhere near the kitchen.) And now my wife is popping in the DVD of "Darby O'Gill and the Little People."

    (Although I've pointed out there's not a bit of Irish in me; the closest being some Scotch-Irish, which really isn't that close if you consider the history.)

    Oddly, what I see at the bottom of this thread is "Users found this page by searching for: muslim food for saint patricks day." Who the heck searched for that??? :O o:
     
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  18. pamc153PA

    pamc153PA Captain Forum Host

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    We had Indian food for dinner tonight, not Irish, some nice chicken tikka masala. But my side of the family is Sicilian and my husband's is PA Dutch--and my son is Guatemalan! We're one big multicultural bunch!
     
  19. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    It is St. Patrick's day on Monday, so bringing this thread back up.

    I am adding a recipe for Irish Coffee, Buckeye Style. It was in our paper this past week in the Food Section. The author says using fresh cream and freshly ground coffee beans makes the Irish Coffee special.

    (Ohio) Irish Coffee

    1/2 cup heavy crème
    3 cups strong black coffee, hot
    4 ounces Irish whiskey or OVO wheat whiskey (This whiskey is made in Columbus, Ohio from Ohio grown soft winter wheat.)
    8 teaspoons packed light brown sugar

    Whip the cream in a small bowl, beat the cream with a small whisk until thickened but still pourable. Transfer to a pouring receptacle with a lip, such as a measuring cup.

    Mix the coffee. Pour 3/4 cup of coffee and 1 ounce whiskey into each glass; add 2 teaspoons of sugar. Using a dinner teaspoon, stir each glass vigorously to dissolve the sugar.

    Finish and serve. To float a 1/2 inch layer of cream on each coffee, hold the tip of the teaspoon wrong side up just over the surface of the coffee and pour the cream down it. Serve immediately.

    Makes 4 drinks.

    From: "The Enquirer", Wednesday, March 12, 2014.

    Enjoy and have a Happy St. Patrick's Day.
     
  20. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Another thread back for St. Patrick's Day.
     
  21. nitrofd

    nitrofd Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    No corn beef and cabbage this year just had a hot corned beef sandwich on rye with spicy mustard , plus we did buy some Keri gold Cheddar Cheese from Ireland.
     
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