Period Food of the Enslaved: Barbecue - This authentic meat recipe and sauces look great for coming New Year's party Too!...


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#3
The word barbecue comes from the Spanish “barbacoa”, which describes they way a tribe of Caribbean Indians cooked their meat. It wasn’t African derived.
But he shows how the slaves did it...not the origination of the name. It was an "evolution" is how they put it.
 
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#6
Great video! The German's who steeled in South Carolina helped develop what is now served as "Mustard Base" barbecue. I have never had it but it is on my bucket list. There seems to be a region of South Carolina, North Carolina and Tennessee that were settled by Germans.
I'm going to try the cloves in the beef too. Always did garlic but never thought of cloves! They go well in ham why not beef?
 
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#7
I really hate to be a downer but this is a really questionable representation of slave food. The reality was corn meal, lard, beans, rice and maybe some meat scraps. They weren't eating "high on the hog". Rather they got the offal, feet, and head.
He mentioned "special occasion"
 
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#14
Now that I think about it..who do you think did all of the cooking daily as well as special occasions on plantations? Certainly wasn't the Southern Belles! View attachment 215771
There was a lady of African descent in Stockton Alabama who would come to your home and bake scratch biscuits. The served them at tea parties and weddings. The best biscuits I have ever eaten, may she rest in peace. I wonder if her recipe was handed down? My grandmother's recipe for chicken and dressing died with her.
 
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#15
Now you've gone and done it, I'm getting hungry! Barbecue wasn't just for the enslaved in
Eastern North Carolina. I wish I could go back in time and attend a hog killing again at my
Grandfather's farm. About two or three times a year, he'd harvest one of the hogs he raised
and I can still taste the cracklings fresh out of the big iron pot that was used to fry them up.
I never had the guts to eat the chitlins some of the adults liked to eat and the hog brains
were saved to go with Grandpa's scrambled eggs the next morning. We made sausage, cut
off and put the hams in the smokehouse and grilled up the rest of that pig in a pit with hard
wood coals for about twelve to fourteen hours depending on the size of the hog. With a
good vinegar based sauce (my apologies to those Western mustard sauce connoissuers)
there was nothing better on earth to a hungry kid from Eastern North Carolina.
 
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#16
The German's who settled in South Carolina helped develop what is now served as "Mustard Base" barbecue.
That makes sense. Known about then for years, but never even wondered, much less sat down to try to figure out the very distinctive variations within South Carolina. Also never figured out why South Carolina isn't more recognized nationally for its Barbecue variations -- seems to me it's got the most distinct varieties of any state!
 
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#17
I really hate to be a downer but this is a really questionable representation of slave food. The reality was corn meal, lard, beans, rice and maybe some meat scraps. They weren't eating "high on the hog". Rather they got the offal, feet, and head.
Enslaved persons and poor free people rarely, if ever, got to eat good cuts of meat. True barbecuing, not backyard grilling, uses low heat, over long periods of time to make tough or low quality meat more edible.
This is the origin of barbecue.
 
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#18
Enslaved persons and poor free people rarely, if ever, got to eat good cuts of meat.
A lot of modern cooking is peasant food that's been fancified to the point said peasants probably wouldn't recognize it. I have some friends who make me chuckle because they scoff at Disney's International efforts (I love Disney's version of Mealie Pap, but I strongly doubt the original is full of Parmesan cheese!), but then go on to serve me 'authentic' peasant dishes that've been just as fooled with. Although, to be fair, often as not it was the peasants' descendants who messed with the recipes by bringing in richer and more expensive ingredients. I've read enough debates about "authentic whatever" between two people from the country or region in question to be a bit cynical about the whole idea of authentic cuisine. Home cooks fool with things, and always have.
 

Jimklag

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#19
Great video! The German's who stettled in South Carolina helped develop what is now served as "Mustard Base" barbecue. I have never had it but it is on my bucket list. There seems to be a region of South Carolina, North Carolina and Tennessee that were settled by Germans.
Interesting. The area of Texas most famous for Texas barbecue is also the area where German immigrants settled.
 
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#20
A lot of modern cooking is peasant food that's been fancified to the point said peasants probably wouldn't recognize it. I have some friends who make me chuckle because they scoff at Disney's International efforts (I love Disney's version of Mealie Pap, but I strongly doubt the original is full of Parmesan cheese!), but then go on to serve me 'authentic' peasant dishes that've been just as fooled with. Although, to be fair, often as not it was the peasants' descendants who messed with the recipes by bringing in richer and more expensive ingredients. I've read enough debates about "authentic whatever" between two people from the country or region in question to be a bit cynical about the whole idea of authentic cuisine. Home cooks fool with things, and always have.
Yes, what you said is true. And we have come full circle haven't we? We are now such a wealthy and prosperous society we have become tired of "rich folks" food and have turned or returned to peasant food for "new tastes." The best example I can think of is grappa, made by Italian peasants from the worthless, leftover dregs of grape squeezings" (for good wine) and considered as undrinkable by "decent society." Within the last 15 years or so, it has been "discovered" and is now expensive and a high status item.
 



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