Authentic Flavored Waters

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
29,716
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
#1
lemonh2o.jpg

Flavored waters were popular in 19th century. Mrs. Lettice Bryan has several in her book, "The Kentucky Housewife", 1839.

Lemon Water

Cut up a fine fresh lemon, and steep it for a short time in a glass of water; then drain off the water, and sweeten it lightly with loaf sugar. It is very cooling and refreshing to sick people.

She also writes that Orange Water may be made in the same manner, and is also good.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
29,716
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
#4
Barley Water

Take a quarter of a pound of common or pearl barley, and wash it clean. Put it in a sauce-pan, with two quarts of water, and boil it soft, or till the liquid is reduced to one-half; then strain it, dissolve in it while hot, enough liquorice to give it a strong flavor, and sweeten it to your taste with loaf sugar.
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2013
Messages
14,064
Location
north central florida
#5
Barley Water

Take a quarter of a pound of common or pearl barley, and wash it clean. Put it in a sauce-pan, with two quarts of water, and boil it soft, or till the liquid is reduced to one-half; then strain it, dissolve in it while hot, enough liquorice to give it a strong flavor, and sweeten it to your taste with loaf sugar.
This is a bit strange,how old is the recipe.
 

Jimklag

Lt. Colonel
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
9,911
Location
Chicagoland
#8
Flavored waters were popular in 19th century. Mrs. Lettice Bryan has several in her book, "The Kentucky Housewife", 1839.

Lemon Water

Cut up a fine fresh lemon, and steep it for a short time in a glass of water; then drain off the water, and sweeten it lightly with loaf sugar. It is very cooling and refreshing to sick people.

She also writes that Orange Water may be made in the same manner, and is also good.
This today's version. Believe it or not, I kinda like it.
PDP_VitaminWaterZero_SqueezedLemonade_20oz.png
 

WJC

Brigadier General
Moderator
Thread Medic
Answered the Call for Reinforcements
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
11,485
#13
View attachment 149556
Flavored waters were popular in 19th century. Mrs. Lettice Bryan has several in her book, "The Kentucky Housewife", 1839.

Lemon Water

Cut up a fine fresh lemon, and steep it for a short time in a glass of water; then drain off the water, and sweeten it lightly with loaf sugar. It is very cooling and refreshing to sick people.

She also writes that Orange Water may be made in the same manner, and is also good.
Thanks for posting.
I believe I'll have the Scotch Water, hold the water....
 

Cavalry Charger

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Messages
5,853
#14
View attachment 149556
Flavored waters were popular in 19th century. Mrs. Lettice Bryan has several in her book, "The Kentucky Housewife", 1839.

Lemon Water

Cut up a fine fresh lemon, and steep it for a short time in a glass of water; then drain off the water, and sweeten it lightly with loaf sugar. It is very cooling and refreshing to sick people.

She also writes that Orange Water may be made in the same manner, and is also good.
Is this the same method for making lemonade, Donna, or is it different?
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
29,716
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
#15
Mrs. Bryan had a Lemonade Recipe in her book too.

She wrote:

"Take ripe lemons, roll them under your fingers on a table till they appear like they are full of juice; then squeeze the juice into a bowl, to each pint of which allow three pints of water; or if in summer, allow two and a half pints of water and a lump of ice equal to the other half pint. Sweeten it to your taste with loaf sugar, and serve it up in small glasses."

It seems the recipes for Lemon Water and Lemonade are very similar. The one for lemonade has the ice. This is one of earliest lemonade recipes I have found.

I hope Pat Young sees this as shows use of ice in 1839 and probably before.

From. "The Kentucky Housewife" by Mrs. Lettice Bryan, 1839, page 387.
 
Joined
Apr 21, 2017
Messages
400
Location
just south of the Red River
#19
My mother made lemon water in the summer, those days she would tend her garden in the sweltering Alabama sun. She likely did not know that the water, vital electrolytes and nutrients, which were found in the brew, saved her from heat stroke.
That is great to know. I'm going to start carrying it with me when I run.
 

Similar threads




(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top