Discussion Flag carried by African-American regiment from Pennsylvania up for auction


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#2
Rare flag carried by African-American troops up for auction. https://civil-war-picket.blogspot.com/2019/06/rare-flag-carried-by-african-american.html. Image courtesy of Morphy Auctions

View attachment 311601
One hundred and twenty-seventh U. S. Colored Troops



Organized at Camp William Penn, Philadelphia, Pa., August 23 to September 10, 1864.
Ordered to City Point, Va., September, 1864. Attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Division,
10th Corps, Army of the James, to November, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division,
10th Corps, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 25th Corps and Dept. of Texas,
to October, 1865.

SERVICE -Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond, Va., September, 1864, to
April, 1865. Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 29-30. Fort Harrison
September 29. Darbytown Road October 13. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Duty in
trenches north of the James River before Richmond till March, 1865. Moved to Hatcher's
Run March 27-28. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Hatcher's Run March 29-31.
Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Appomattox Court House April 9.
Surrender of Lee and his army. Duty at Petersburg and City Point till June. Moved to
Brazos Santiago, Texas, June and July. Duty at various points on the Rio Grande till
October. Mustered out October 20, 1865.


Frederick A. Dyer "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" vol. 3

***********************************************************************

Report of Lieut. Col. James Givin, One hundred and
twenty-seventh U. S. Colored Troops.

HDQRS. 127TH U. S. COLORED TROOPS,
Near Petersburg, Va., April 22, 1865.
SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by
the One hundred and twenty-seventh Regt. U. S. Colored Troops in
the recent active campaign:

On the afternoon of Wednesday, March 29, 1865, the regiment was for
the first time drawn up in line of battle, with a prospect of engaging the
enemy on the west side of Hatcher's Run, and in support of Foster's
division, Twenty-fourth Army Corps. Skirmishing continued throughout
the night, but the regiment was not engaged. At night a
detail of 500 men was engaged in throwing up breast-works. At daylight
again formed line, and at 9.30 a.m. 30th was relieved by the Forty-fifth
U. S. Colored Troops and ordered to the rear to rest, but before
reaching camp was ordered, with the Fort-first U. S. Colored Troops,
to the right to relieve Col. Fairchild's brigade, Twenty-fourth Corps.
Here threw up another line of works, connecting with the line thrown
up the night previous and perpendicular to the old line of the Army of
the Potomac. At night slept on arms, and one the 31st resumed
strengthening line of works. April 1, remained in same position. April
2, entered rebel works, moved up to Battery 435, and formed for charge
on right of brigade with one "group of fours" from each company
advanced as skirmishes. In this position the regiment sustained a severe
fire, but owing to inaccuracy of the rebel marksmen only three men
were wounded, none killed. The position of the regiment being
considered by the brigadier-general commanding division (on personal
inspection) too much exposed, he ordered me to place it in a safer
position, when I advanced about 100 yards to the foot of a hill. After
remaining in this position for some time the brigade was withdrawn.

At daylight on the 3d moved with the division through the enemy's
works at Battery 45 and entered Petersburg, thence out the Cox road to
the intersection of the South Side Railroad. April 4, marched to
Wilson's Station; April 5, to Blacks and Whites; April 6, to Rice's
Station. April 7, by a circuitous route entered Farmville. April 8,
marched day and night, and at daylight arrived in front of the rebel
army near Appomattox Court-House. April 9, was ordered to guard the
ammunition train of the Twenty-fourth Corps (to which at that time the
brigade was attached); convoyed it close to the skirmish line until the
enemy surrendered.

During this very severe march regimental commanders had a fine
opportunity of judging of both officers and men. The majority of the
officers of this regiment proved themselves worthy of the trust reposed
in them. The services of Capt. E. N. Willard, who acted as major,
were invaluable; although sick he did not leave his post until after the
surrender. Capt.'s Tinkham and Stanfield, Lieut.'s Markley,
Harding, and Stewart deserve special mention. The men, though short
of rations and almost worn our with fatigue, moved on without a
murmur as long as there was an enemy to follow, and proved themselves to
be a body of men upon whom the Government can safely rely in her hour of peril.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES GIVIN,
Lieut. Col. 127th U. S. Colored Troops, Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. JAMES M. LYON,
Acting Adjutant-Gen.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. LVIII.] THE APPOMATTOX CAMPAIGN. PAGE 1240-95
[Series I. Vol. 46. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 95.]
 

christian soldier

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#3
I am very sadden that this flag was not donated to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's Flag Collection which is apart of the State Museum of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg. I do not think this particular flag should be held in private hands, it belongs to the people of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, the outfit selling the flag needs the funds according to the television report I saw the other night. The Capitol Preservation Committee was formed in 1985 to conserve all of the Pennsylvania Civil war flags in their collections. This project was finally completed in the late 1980's. David.
 

USS ALASKA

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Messages
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#4
Atlanta History Center acquires rare Civil War African American troop flag
Posted by Evelyn Andrews
Jun 14, 2019

The Atlanta History Center in Buckhead has acquired a rare, historic flag for an African American Civil War troop, the museum announced.

The flag, which was used by the 127th United States Colored Troops, is one of fewer than 25 known carried by African American soldiers. The museum plans to put it on exhibit as soon as possible.

The artifact is “key to the story of Civil War” and helps the History Center continue its mission of increasing inclusivity, the museum said. The flag was purchased June 13 for $196,800, the most the museum has ever paid for a single artifact, it said.

Full article can be found here - https://www.reporternewspapers.net/...s-rare-civil-war-african-american-troop-flag/
73

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
9,543
Location
Carlisle, PA
#5
Atlanta History Center acquires rare Civil War African American troop flag
Posted by Evelyn Andrews
Jun 14, 2019

The Atlanta History Center in Buckhead has acquired a rare, historic flag for an African American Civil War troop, the museum announced.

The flag, which was used by the 127th United States Colored Troops, is one of fewer than 25 known carried by African American soldiers. The museum plans to put it on exhibit as soon as possible.

The artifact is “key to the story of Civil War” and helps the History Center continue its mission of increasing inclusivity, the museum said. The flag was purchased June 13 for $196,800, the most the museum has ever paid for a single artifact, it said.

Full article can be found here - https://www.reporternewspapers.net/...s-rare-civil-war-african-american-troop-flag/
73

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
I'm just glad that it went to a museum and not a private collector.

Ryan
 



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