First Post Battle Photograph Inside The Angle

Gettysburg Greg

Sergeant
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Jun 6, 2010
Location
Decatur, Illinois
The top photo is the first good look at the area inside the Angle taken since the battle 19 years before. This is one of Tipton's 10 photo series that served or a model for the Cyclorama. If not for the Codori farm in the distance at left, I would find the location nearly unrecognizable. The fence line running away from the camera terminates at the Angle. Notice this fence was a cow high/pig tight variety in 1882, but I believe it was just a low stone wall during the battle as seen in the modern view on the bottom.
SV combo.jpg
 

Gettysburg Guide #154

Sergeant
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Dec 30, 2019
Love these "then and now" comparisons. It really helps to understand what was where at the time of the battle, or at least closer in time. Notice to the left of the Codori buildings that there is a structure that appears to be along Emmitsburg Road. I believe that would be the Rogers House, which is no longer there.
 

infomanpa

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Location
Pennsylvania
What strikes me is that there appears to be a row of bushes or saplings along the wall. It changes the way that I envision the battle. Were the Union soldiers able to use that as cover during the "Charge?" I don't remember any references to that in the records.
 

Gettysburg Greg

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Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Location
Decatur, Illinois
What strikes me is that there appears to be a row of bushes or saplings along the wall. It changes the way that I envision the battle. Were the Union soldiers able to use that as cover during the "Charge?" I don't remember any references to that in the records.
I believe that the scrub growth is post battle.
 

J C J Barefoot

Private
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Land shifts and rolls over time. Especially in Pennsylvania with rock laid base. And even more so in Adams county with the shifting boulders. It appears the ground west of the Emmetsburg road was maybe five to seven feet lower that today? Perhaps deeper. This would confirm the historic accounts about the depth of the slope before Emmitsburg. That is why it looks like a sea. If so, when the CSA came up from the slop into the road and fence it would have been more dramatic.
 

Gettysburg Guide #154

Sergeant
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Bear in mind that during some of the years between the two photos part of the ground on the other side of Emmitsburg Road was Camp Colt. There were barracks, an officers club with a swimming pool, and of course a tank training course. Happily, they were only operating one or two French tanks (the number depends on who is writing the history). I am sure they changed the topography to some degree.
 

infomanpa

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Location
Pennsylvania
Land shifts and rolls over time. Especially in Pennsylvania with rock laid base. And even more so in Adams county with the shifting boulders. It appears the ground west of the Emmetsburg road was maybe five to seven feet lower that today? Perhaps deeper. This would confirm the historic accounts about the depth of the slope before Emmitsburg. That is why it looks like a sea. If so, when the CSA came up from the slop into the road and fence it would have been more dramatic.
Rock laid base is the most stable base. If there were any significant changes in the terrain since the battle, they are due to man-made modifications. I would say that naturally, in the period of only 150 years, there would be little or no "land shifts and rolls." Rock is especially stable, more so with the erosion-resistant diabase boulders in Adams County. If you have evidence of your conclusions, I would be interested.
 

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
When I was in field school, our professor taught us to look at features on the land to determine past usage. It really changed the way I view landscapes, expecially the before and after photos.

Thanks for the post, really fascinating!
 

J C J Barefoot

Private
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Rock laid base is the most stable base. If there were any significant changes in the terrain since the battle, they are due to man-made modifications. I would say that naturally, in the period of only 150 years, there would be little or no "land shifts and rolls." Rock is especially stable, more so with the erosion-resistant diabase boulders in Adams County. If you have evidence of your conclusions, I would be interested.
No evidence , just speculating. Thank you for clearing that up.. Great work and great photo.
 
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