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Benjamin Hill and David Shockley are both descendants of John Douglas.

Benjamin J. Hill - Benjamin Jefferson Hill was a Confederate States Army brigadier general during the American Civil War. Before the war, he was a merchant and served in the Tennessee Senate. After the war, he was a merchant, lawyer and president of the McMinnville and Manchester Railroad.

Brigadier General in the Civil War serving the Confederacy as leader of the Thirty-Fifth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers which was later known as the Fifth Tennessee. (This portrait hangs in the Magness Library in McMinnville, TN) General B. J. Hill married Mary V. Smartt and both are interred in the old town cemetery in McMinnville, TN.

Confederate Brig Gen at End of War. Colonel 35th Tennessee Infantry, Perrysville, Shiloh, Corinth, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Dalton, Chickmauga, Chattanooga, Tunnel Hill, Hoovers Gap, Rocky Face, Atlanta Surrendered His calvary force at Bridgeport Alabama last command this east side of Mississippi to surrender. He was suppose to be the next relay for President Davis escort out of country. Davis never made it to rendevous point.

Benjamin John Hill Brigadier General CSA.jpg


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Benjamin J. Hill - Benjamin Jefferson Hill was a Confederate States Army brigadier general during the American Civil War. Before the war, he was a merchant and served in the Tennessee Senate. After the war, he was a merchant, lawyer and president of the McMinnville and Manchester Railroad.

Brigadier General in the Civil War serving the Confederacy as leader of the Thirty-Fifth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers which was later known as the Fifth Tennessee. (This portrait hangs in the Magness Library in McMinnville, TN) General B. J. Hill married Mary V. Smartt and both are interred in the old town cemetery in McMinnville, TN.

Confederate Brig Gen at End of War. Colonel 35th Tennessee Infantry, Perrysville, Shiloh, Corinth, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Dalton, Chickmauga, Chattanooga, Tunnel Hill, Hoovers Gap, Rocky Face, Atlanta Surrendered His calvary force at Bridgeport Alabama last command this east side of Mississippi to surrender. He was suppose to be the next relay for President Davis escort out of country. Davis never made it to rendevous point.

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Congratulations !

Thirty-fifth Tennessee Infantry


Shiloh after battle report:

Reports of Col. Ben. J. Hill, Fifth Tennessee Infantry.*
(This regiment afterwards known as the Thirty-fifth.)

HDQRS. FIFTH TENNESSEE REGT. PROV. ARMY, Camp, near
Corinth, Miss., April 15, 1862.
SIR: In compliance with your request, I have the honor to make the
following report, showing the positions occupied by my command
during the eventful scenes of the 6th and 7th instant at Shiloh, in Hardin
County, Tenn.:

My regiment was detailed to do picket duty on Saturday night [5th], and
was thrown out within 3 or 4 miles of the enemy's encampment.

At daylight Sunday morning we were ordered to advance with the
balance of your brigade, the Sixth Mississippi, Col. Thornton, on my
right, and the Twenty-fourth Tennessee, Lieut.-Col. Peebles, on
my left. We advanced some 3 miles, when our pickets commenced a
sharp and lively skirmish. We continued to advance and drove them
before us to within 500 yards of the Federal encampment. They opened
a terrific fire upon our columns. A deep ravine, full of green briers and
grape-vines, separated us from Col. Thornton's regiment. My right
was exposed to a severe flank fire from a battery and from musketry
and other small-arms. We were at the foot of a long hill, upon which
the enemy were hidden.
Capt. Hanner, Company A, and several others were killed at this
place and many wounded.

The Fifteenth Arkansas, Lieut.-Col. Patton, was in advance of
us and deployed as skirmishers, but was soon called in to sustain the
Twenty-fourth Tennessee, on the left, which it performed gallantly and
promptly. The firing was constant and continuous for half or
three-quarters of an hour, when one of the aides of Gen. Beauregard
came to me and said the battery on the right must be charged and
silenced at all hazards. I gave the word and my brave boys promptly
responded to it. We charged, dispersed the enemy, and silenced the
battery. As the enemy retreated my marksmen had better opportunity for
trying their skill, and well did they improve it, as was proven by the
number of the enemy who there fell. We continued on at double-quick
for near a mile, crossing their first encampment, and formed line of
battle at the foot of the next hill.

At this time the Twenty-third Tennessee, Lieut.-Col. Neill, and
the Sixth Mississippi, Col. Thornton, constituting the right wing of
your brigade, getting separated, you had to go to their aid.

I was then directed, as senior colonel, to take command of all the troops
on my left by one of Gen. Beauregard's staff, which I did, and
formed them in line of battle, to keep back their right wing. Thus, with
two Louisiana regiments on the left of your brigade, the Texas Rangers
on the extreme left, on Owl Creek, a battery in our rear, the Louisiana
cavalry as pickets, and the Fifteenth Arkansas, Lieut.-Col.
Patton, as skirmishers, we advanced at once, driving the extreme right
of the enemy for at least a mile before us. They halted at their third
encampment and gave us a stubborn fight. The Fourth Kentucky and a
battalion of Alabama troops were here on our right, sheltered under the
brow of a hill. They had been giving the enemy a hot fire, but ceased
as we came up. My regiment then opened a terrible fire upon the enemy
and kept it up alone for a short time, when
the Twenty-fourth Tennessee joined with us in firing upon them.
Col. Freeman, commanding a Tennessee regiment, with a squadron
of cavalry, then moved rapidly to the left and opened fire upon their
right flank. This, in conjunction with our fire in front, told with terrible
effect, and they retreated, leaving many of their dead and wounded
behind them.

We pursued them and had just formed on the fourth hill and in sight of
their fourth encampment, when you returned to cheer us with your
presence and to supply us with ammunition.

The remainder of the evening and during the next day [Monday] we
fought under your immediate command. It is unnecessary for me to
enumerate and recite the many charges and the many incidents that
occurred on Monday, as you were in command and witnessed them all.
In conclusion, I beg leave to say that my men, though inexperienced,
fought well and bravely, and never failed to charge or rally when I
commanded them so to do.

As far as my observation went all the Tennessee troops fought well. So
it was with the Arkansas troops, the Mississippi, the Kentucky, and the
Alabama troops on the left. All of them fought nobly and gallantly and
against great odds.

My regiment captured about 100 prisoners during the two days' fighting.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

BEN. J. HILL,
Col., Comdg. Fifth Tennessee Regt., Provisional Army.

Brig. Gen. P. R. CLEBURNE,
Cmdg. Second Brigade.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. FIFTH TENNESSEE REGT., PROV. ARMY, Camp Hill,
Miss., April 22, 1862.
SIR: In obedience to Special Orders, No.--, of date the 21st instant, in
relation to the number of men of this regiment engaged in the battles at
Shiloh on the 6th and 7th instant, I have to report as follows, to wit:


Number detailed as infirmary or hospital corps................. 29
Number detailed to go with the artillery....................... 6
Number detailed to go with the sappers and miners.............. 1
Number detailed as wagon guard................................. 3
Number detailed to guard ammunition............................ 2

Total detailed................................................. 41

Number of non-commissioned officers and privates engaged.......328
Number of company officers [commissioned]...................... 33
Number of field officers....................................... 3
Number of staff officers....................................... 5
Total engaged..................................................369


In reply to that portion of the order which refers to the individual action
of the officers and men of this regiment on the battle-field of Shiloh, I
have to say the officers and men of the regiment fought well and acted
with great coolness and bravery, considering their inexperience. Such
was the conduct of most of them on the field. I am pained
to report that there are a few exceptions. In Capt. John Macon's
company [F] Second Lieut. W. R. Morrow is reported as having left
the field Sunday morning under pretense of assisting a wounded brother,
though he was positively forbidden so to do by his captain, and did not
again return to his company during the two days' fighting. Private
Dimmon Martin, of the same company, showed great timidity, and had
to be repeatedly ordered to fire his gun before he would do so.

In Capt. James H. Wood's company [G], commanded by Acting
Lieut. F. M. Gunter, Acting Lieut. A. H. Burger and
Sergt. Jacob B. Sellars left the command early on Sunday morning, the
6th, without permission from their leader, and were seen no more with
the company until the regiment returned to Corinth.

In Capt. Forrest's company [C], Private Samuel Evans displayed great
coolness and courage. After being severely wounded, the ball passing
through the cheeks, he refused to go to the rear, but remained and
fought for a considerable length of time, cheering on the men and
loading and shooting as fast as he could.

In Capt. Towles' company , commanded by Lieut. B. R.
Womack, Privates J. D. Smith, Douglass Brien, and J. T. Pennington are
mentioned as having distinguished themselves by their bravery and
daring.

In Company D, commanded by Lieut. J. L. Jones, and subsequently,
after the wounding of Lieut. Jones, by Lieut. R. C. Smartt,
Private John Roberts, a very young soldier, behaved with the greatest
coolness and bravery throughout the whole action. He was frequently in
advance of his company, was knocked down twice by spent balls, and
had his gun shattered to pieces. He is but fifteen years old, but displayed
the coolness and courage of a veteran.

In Company F, Capt. Edward J. Wood, Lieut. C. C. Brewer is spoken
of in the highest terms for cool bravery and gallant bearing. Following
the lead and imitating the example of his captain, one of the bravest of
the brave, he was ever at the head of the men, his gallant captain only
in advance, cheering them on to the conflict, and ever and anon
dropping one of the Yankees as his eye would chance to light upon him.
Privates Abe Boren and Isaac L. Ray, of the same company, also greatly
distinguished themselves, and are spoken of in the highest terms by their
comrades and their captain.

Lieut. George S. Deakins, of Capt. W. D. Stewart's company [K],
was also conspicuous throughout the engagement for coolness and
gallant behavior. It is no doubt invidious to single out instances of this
kind. Officers and men all did well, considering that they were raw and
inexperienced, and they were out Saturday night, the whole regiment on
picket duty, and consequently unrefreshed.

There is one other exception, to which duty compels me to allude.
Capt. L. L. Dearman, commanding company I, acted in a very
unbecoming and cowardly manner. Several times I had to threaten to
shoot him for hiding far back in the rear of his men.

Respectfully submitted.

B. J. HILL,
Col., Comdg. Fifth Tennessee Regt., Provisional Army.

Maj. POWHATAN ELLIS, JR.,
Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Brigade, Third Army Corps.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10



Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Col. Benjamin J. Hill, Thirty-fifth Tennessee Infantry.

HDQRS. THIRTY-FIFTH AND FORTY-EIGHTH TENN. REGTS.
Georgetown Mills, October 30, 1863.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the
action taken by my command (the Thirty-fifth Tennessee Regt.)
in the engagements of September 19 and 20, on Chickamauga
River:

On Saturday morning, September 19, my command moved up to
within about 2 miles of Lee and Gordon's Mills, from the
direction of La Fayette, on the Chattanooga and La Fayette road,
in connection with the remainder of the brigade and the division,
to support
Maj.-Gen. Breckinridge, who had position on the left of
our line of battle. At about 11 or 12 m. the command was
ordered around to the extreme right, and wading the
Chickamauga, took position near Underwood's steam saw-mill a
little before sunset. Shortly after this the command was ordered
forward, and after having advanced about 400 yards, passing the
line formed by Gen. Liddell's command and other troops, we
encountered the enemy in strong position, one for which the
opposing forces had been contending throughout almost the entire
day. I ordered Capt. Newboy, of Company a, to throw forward
his company as skirmishers, thus leaving Capt. Mitchell on the
right and Capt. Alley on the left. Here the left and center of our
brigade became engaged, the firing from both artillery and
small-arms becoming general and heavy. The engagement was
fierce, lasting for about one hour. My command being on the
right of the brigade did not fire but a few shots for the first half
hour.

About this time Gen. Hill and staff came riding by, and
complimented my command for the uniform and steady advance
they were making, and their cool and manly conduct, he
remarking at the same time that a battery would soon open upon
the enemy from our rear with shell, grape, and canister; that he
had ordered it for its moral effect. Gen. Hill had not passed on
more than 200 yards to our right when the battery did open, but
instead of reaching the enemy they threw their missiles into my
command, which was very annoying. I immediately galloped
back and soon had the firing stopped. A cavalry force here also
fired upon us through mistake, but fortunately, however, doing
us little damage. This error, too, I speedily corrected, and
moving on forward met and routed the Sixth Indiana Regt.,
taking some few prisoners, one of them being an orderly to Maj.
Campbell, commanding Sixth Indiana, and also 2 horses
belonging to the major. The engagement lasted about one hour,
resulting in the dislodgment of the enemy, who fell back in
confusion about three-quarters of a mile to the position in which
we attacked them on Sunday morning. We bivouacked upon the
ground for which the contest had been so hotly waged during the
day, the men suffering considerably during the night from cold,
their clothing being yet wet from wading Chickamauga Creek,
and no fires being allowed, owing to the close proximity of the
enemy.

My loss was slight, having but 2 men slightly wounded.

I cannot close my report of this engagement without remarking
that, from what I myself saw and from reports from others of the
brigade, Gen. Polk and staff acted with great coolness,
discretion, and gallantry.

On the next morning (20th), the command was awakened very
early, I anticipating that the battle would be renewed by daylight.
We, however, waited in suspense until about 9. 30 or 10 a. m.,
when we were called to attention and ordered forward. We very
soon found the enemy in a position strong by nature, and
rendered doubly so by breastworks of logs, rocks, and rails,
erected during the night. In fact, the position was almost
impregnable. While here Brig.-Gen. Polk rode up to me through
a shower of shot and shell, and ordered me to hold this position
and the day was ours, and right gallantly did my little command,
already reduced nearly one-half, comply with the orders given,
subjected as they were to a terrific fire from the front and a fire
enfilading us from the fortifications on our right. We held the
position as directed for about 2 1/2 hours, when
we were ordered back by Capt. King, of Gen. Polk's staff,
the other regiments of the brigade having retired a few minutes
previously. Many of my regiment had already exhausted their
ammunition. I retired in good order, the front and rear ranks
while retiring fighting alternately with the enemy. I succeeded in
bringing off all my wounded, but left those who were killed on
the field. We fell back a distance of about half a mile, when we
rested and replenished our ammunition.

Capt. Mitchell's company, being on the right and in a more
exposed position, suffered more severely than the remainder of
the regiment, and I must here add that, notwithstanding it was
the first engagement in which his command had participated,
both he and his company displayed much courage and gallantry.

Our loss here, as well as that of the whole brigade, was very
severe, fighting the enemy, as we did, not more than 70 yards
from his breastworks.

Between 3 and 4 p. m. the command was again called to
attention, and moved by the right flank in order to connect with
Gen. Jackson's left. Skirmishers were immediately thrown out in
advance and a forward movement commenced. Their skirmishers
were soon driven in, when we aging became generally and
fiercely engaged, they still holding the strong position in which
we had engaged them in the morning. They at this point poured
into us a most destructive fire from artillery and small-arms,
which broke our lines, driving our men back about 100 yards,
and a complete rout for a time seemed inevitable. I, however,
with the aid of Gen. Polk, Capt. King, and the officers of my
regiment, succeeded in rallying the men, and having reformed
our line moved forward to renew the attack. After advancing to
the brow of the hill, which was immediately in front of us, I
discovered that the regiment composing the left of Gen.
Jackson's command was considerably in our rear. I also
discovered that Calvert's battery, in our rear, was not engaged,
since, owing to the nature of the ground, it was impossible for
our artillery to render my efficient service from any position in
rear of our line of battle. The enemy's artillery was playing most
destructively upon our ranks, where upon I suggested to Lieut.
Key, commanding our battery, to plant one section upon the crest
of the hill, to which position I ordered it rolled by men from my
command as well as from the other regiments composing the
brigade.

This artillery did noble service in helping dislodge the enemy
from his first line of fortifications, dealing out destruction at
every discharge. They did noble service until they exhausted their
ammunition. During the progress of this artillery duel, my negro
boy having failed to bring up my sword, I took a pole or club
and with this drove up officers and men of my own command
who were shielding themselves behind trees, as well as those on
the left of the left regiment of Jackson's brigade. As soon as
Lieut. Key had exhausted all his ammunition, we moved forward
some 150 yards. Here Gen. Polk informed me that Col. Colquitt,
commanding the First Arkansas, had taken possession of the
enemy's first line of fortifications and was out of ammunition,
and for me to furnish him as far as possible, stating that he wished
me to hold the position I then occupied, and also Col. Colquitt to hold
highs until we were relieved by Gen. Maney's brigade. Gen. Polk then
rode back to request Gen. Maney to relieve us with fresh troops,
when I discovered the enemy wavering in the second line of
fortifications and deemed this
a favorable moment to advance, which I did in connection
with the remainder of the brigade. Before this, however, I had
sent Lieut.-Col. Martin, of the First Arkansas, to the officer in
command of the regiment on Jackson's left, who was still
lagging, with instructions to move his command forward. He
(the officer just referred to) not responding, I ordered Lieut.-Col.
Roberts, of my regiment, to deliver the same instructions. He
now moved forward a short distance, but again halted. I then
went to him myself, representing myself as Gen. Hill, and told
him to advance; that victory was in our grasp. He replied that he
was awaiting orders from his brigade commander. I told him that
he could retreat without orders, and that he could advance
without, and that I took the responsibility of ordering him to do
so. His men at this rose up and moved forward gallantly about
300 yards, when they again came to a halt. I again approached
him, demanding the cause. He replied that their ammunition was
exhausted. Seeing a willingness to advance on the part of the
officers and men, I told him that he needed no ammunition, but
to fix bayonets and charge, which they cheerfully did.

In the meantime, I had ordered my major to take charge of the
prisoners as they arrived, and not allow the men to be running to
the rear on the pretext of carrying back prisoners. He (the major)
collected and sent to the rear about 75. Just at this juncture Capt.
Douglas, commanding a Texas battery, came to me, asking if he
could be of any service with his battery. I had it placed in
position and ordered him to throw three shells into the ranks of
the routed enemy intending thereby to add to their confusion and
demoralization. They had the intended effect. Just at this time
Gen. Breckinridge rode up and requested me not to enfilade his
men. I replied that I would not. He immediately passed on to the
right. I, taking charge of Col. Colquitt's horse, rode forward
with the brigade to the Chattanooga and La Fayette road, where
you will recollect, general, you rode up amid shouts and
rejoicing. This closed the day's labor, and we here rested for the
night.

My loss in the series of engagements was 7 killed on the field
and 54 wounded, out of 215 men.

I have already made this report too long, but cannot,
nevertheless, close without speaking a few words in praise and
commendation of some of my officers and men.

Lieut.-Col. Roberts and Maj. Deakins did their whole duty in
commanding the skirmishers, both day and night and displayed
great coolness and courage throughout the entire engagement, or
series of engagements.

Capt.'s Newby, Kell, Mitchell, Blair, Alley, Cummings, and
Lieut.'s Barnes and Cunningham, commanding companies, with
Lieut.'s Summer, Boydston, Lewis, Mitchell, Masey, Taylor,
Richards, Hatfield, Bonner, Haston, Hamrick, Rawlings, and
Dyer, all acted well, performing their whole duty, as they had
done on many former occasions. In fact, all my officers, with
but two exceptions, did themselves great credit, while but few
exceptions can be made in the conduct and bearing of my men.
They are certainly entitled to a high degree of praise.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. J. HILL,
Col., Comdg. Thirty-fifth Tennessee Regt.

Capt. W. A. KING, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Polk's Brigade.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 181-51 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLII.
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 51.]
 
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#6
Congratulations !

Thirty-fifth Tennessee Infantry


Shiloh after battle report:

Reports of Col. Ben. J. Hill, Fifth Tennessee Infantry.*
(This regiment afterwards known as the Thirty-fifth.)

HDQRS. FIFTH TENNESSEE REGT. PROV. ARMY, Camp, near
Corinth, Miss., April 15, 1862.
SIR: In compliance with your request, I have the honor to make the
following report, showing the positions occupied by my command
during the eventful scenes of the 6th and 7th instant at Shiloh, in Hardin
County, Tenn.:

My regiment was detailed to do picket duty on Saturday night [5th], and
was thrown out within 3 or 4 miles of the enemy's encampment.

At daylight Sunday morning we were ordered to advance with the
balance of your brigade, the Sixth Mississippi, Col. Thornton, on my
right, and the Twenty-fourth Tennessee, Lieut.-Col. Peebles, on
my left. We advanced some 3 miles, when our pickets commenced a
sharp and lively skirmish. We continued to advance and drove them
before us to within 500 yards of the Federal encampment. They opened
a terrific fire upon our columns. A deep ravine, full of green briers and
grape-vines, separated us from Col. Thornton's regiment. My right
was exposed to a severe flank fire from a battery and from musketry
and other small-arms. We were at the foot of a long hill, upon which
the enemy were hidden.
Capt. Hanner, Company A, and several others were killed at this
place and many wounded.

The Fifteenth Arkansas, Lieut.-Col. Patton, was in advance of
us and deployed as skirmishers, but was soon called in to sustain the
Twenty-fourth Tennessee, on the left, which it performed gallantly and
promptly. The firing was constant and continuous for half or
three-quarters of an hour, when one of the aides of Gen. Beauregard
came to me and said the battery on the right must be charged and
silenced at all hazards. I gave the word and my brave boys promptly
responded to it. We charged, dispersed the enemy, and silenced the
battery. As the enemy retreated my marksmen had better opportunity for
trying their skill, and well did they improve it, as was proven by the
number of the enemy who there fell. We continued on at double-quick
for near a mile, crossing their first encampment, and formed line of
battle at the foot of the next hill.

At this time the Twenty-third Tennessee, Lieut.-Col. Neill, and
the Sixth Mississippi, Col. Thornton, constituting the right wing of
your brigade, getting separated, you had to go to their aid.

I was then directed, as senior colonel, to take command of all the troops
on my left by one of Gen. Beauregard's staff, which I did, and
formed them in line of battle, to keep back their right wing. Thus, with
two Louisiana regiments on the left of your brigade, the Texas Rangers
on the extreme left, on Owl Creek, a battery in our rear, the Louisiana
cavalry as pickets, and the Fifteenth Arkansas, Lieut.-Col.
Patton, as skirmishers, we advanced at once, driving the extreme right
of the enemy for at least a mile before us. They halted at their third
encampment and gave us a stubborn fight. The Fourth Kentucky and a
battalion of Alabama troops were here on our right, sheltered under the
brow of a hill. They had been giving the enemy a hot fire, but ceased
as we came up. My regiment then opened a terrible fire upon the enemy
and kept it up alone for a short time, when
the Twenty-fourth Tennessee joined with us in firing upon them.
Col. Freeman, commanding a Tennessee regiment, with a squadron
of cavalry, then moved rapidly to the left and opened fire upon their
right flank. This, in conjunction with our fire in front, told with terrible
effect, and they retreated, leaving many of their dead and wounded
behind them.

We pursued them and had just formed on the fourth hill and in sight of
their fourth encampment, when you returned to cheer us with your
presence and to supply us with ammunition.

The remainder of the evening and during the next day [Monday] we
fought under your immediate command. It is unnecessary for me to
enumerate and recite the many charges and the many incidents that
occurred on Monday, as you were in command and witnessed them all.
In conclusion, I beg leave to say that my men, though inexperienced,
fought well and bravely, and never failed to charge or rally when I
commanded them so to do.

As far as my observation went all the Tennessee troops fought well. So
it was with the Arkansas troops, the Mississippi, the Kentucky, and the
Alabama troops on the left. All of them fought nobly and gallantly and
against great odds.

My regiment captured about 100 prisoners during the two days' fighting.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

BEN. J. HILL,
Col., Comdg. Fifth Tennessee Regt., Provisional Army.

Brig. Gen. P. R. CLEBURNE,
Cmdg. Second Brigade.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. FIFTH TENNESSEE REGT., PROV. ARMY, Camp Hill,
Miss., April 22, 1862.
SIR: In obedience to Special Orders, No.--, of date the 21st instant, in
relation to the number of men of this regiment engaged in the battles at
Shiloh on the 6th and 7th instant, I have to report as follows, to wit:


Number detailed as infirmary or hospital corps................. 29
Number detailed to go with the artillery....................... 6
Number detailed to go with the sappers and miners.............. 1
Number detailed as wagon guard................................. 3
Number detailed to guard ammunition............................ 2

Total detailed................................................. 41

Number of non-commissioned officers and privates engaged.......328
Number of company officers [commissioned]...................... 33
Number of field officers....................................... 3
Number of staff officers....................................... 5
Total engaged..................................................369


In reply to that portion of the order which refers to the individual action
of the officers and men of this regiment on the battle-field of Shiloh, I
have to say the officers and men of the regiment fought well and acted
with great coolness and bravery, considering their inexperience. Such
was the conduct of most of them on the field. I am pained
to report that there are a few exceptions. In Capt. John Macon's
company [F] Second Lieut. W. R. Morrow is reported as having left
the field Sunday morning under pretense of assisting a wounded brother,
though he was positively forbidden so to do by his captain, and did not
again return to his company during the two days' fighting. Private
Dimmon Martin, of the same company, showed great timidity, and had
to be repeatedly ordered to fire his gun before he would do so.

In Capt. James H. Wood's company [G], commanded by Acting
Lieut. F. M. Gunter, Acting Lieut. A. H. Burger and
Sergt. Jacob B. Sellars left the command early on Sunday morning, the
6th, without permission from their leader, and were seen no more with
the company until the regiment returned to Corinth.

In Capt. Forrest's company [C], Private Samuel Evans displayed great
coolness and courage. After being severely wounded, the ball passing
through the cheeks, he refused to go to the rear, but remained and
fought for a considerable length of time, cheering on the men and
loading and shooting as fast as he could.

In Capt. Towles' company , commanded by Lieut. B. R.
Womack, Privates J. D. Smith, Douglass Brien, and J. T. Pennington are
mentioned as having distinguished themselves by their bravery and
daring.


In Company D, commanded by Lieut. J. L. Jones, and subsequently,
after the wounding of Lieut. Jones, by Lieut. R. C. Smartt,
Private John Roberts, a very young soldier, behaved with the greatest
coolness and bravery throughout the whole action. He was frequently in
advance of his company, was knocked down twice by spent balls, and
had his gun shattered to pieces. He is but fifteen years old, but displayed
the coolness and courage of a veteran.


In Company F, Capt. Edward J. Wood, Lieut. C. C. Brewer is spoken
of in the highest terms for cool bravery and gallant bearing. Following
the lead and imitating the example of his captain, one of the bravest of
the brave, he was ever at the head of the men, his gallant captain only
in advance, cheering them on to the conflict, and ever and anon
dropping one of the Yankees as his eye would chance to light upon him.
Privates Abe Boren and Isaac L. Ray, of the same company, also greatly
distinguished themselves, and are spoken of in the highest terms by their
comrades and their captain.


Lieut. George S. Deakins, of Capt. W. D. Stewart's company [K],
was also conspicuous throughout the engagement for coolness and
gallant behavior. It is no doubt invidious to single out instances of this
kind. Officers and men all did well, considering that they were raw and
inexperienced, and they were out Saturday night, the whole regiment on
picket duty, and consequently unrefreshed.


There is one other exception, to which duty compels me to allude.
Capt. L. L. Dearman, commanding company I, acted in a very
unbecoming and cowardly manner. Several times I had to threaten to
shoot him for hiding far back in the rear of his men.


Respectfully submitted.

B. J. HILL,
Col., Comdg. Fifth Tennessee Regt., Provisional Army.


Maj. POWHATAN ELLIS, JR.,
Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Brigade, Third Army Corps.


Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10



Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Col. Benjamin J. Hill, Thirty-fifth Tennessee Infantry.

HDQRS. THIRTY-FIFTH AND FORTY-EIGHTH TENN. REGTS.
Georgetown Mills, October 30, 1863.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the
action taken by my command (the Thirty-fifth Tennessee Regt.)
in the engagements of September 19 and 20, on Chickamauga
River:


On Saturday morning, September 19, my command moved up to
within about 2 miles of Lee and Gordon's Mills, from the
direction of La Fayette, on the Chattanooga and La Fayette road,
in connection with the remainder of the brigade and the division,
to support
Maj.-Gen. Breckinridge, who had position on the left of
our line of battle. At about 11 or 12 m. the command was
ordered around to the extreme right, and wading the
Chickamauga, took position near Underwood's steam saw-mill a
little before sunset. Shortly after this the command was ordered
forward, and after having advanced about 400 yards, passing the
line formed by Gen. Liddell's command and other troops, we
encountered the enemy in strong position, one for which the
opposing forces had been contending throughout almost the entire
day. I ordered Capt. Newboy, of Company a, to throw forward
his company as skirmishers, thus leaving Capt. Mitchell on the
right and Capt. Alley on the left. Here the left and center of our
brigade became engaged, the firing from both artillery and
small-arms becoming general and heavy. The engagement was
fierce, lasting for about one hour. My command being on the
right of the brigade did not fire but a few shots for the first half
hour.


About this time Gen. Hill and staff came riding by, and
complimented my command for the uniform and steady advance
they were making, and their cool and manly conduct, he
remarking at the same time that a battery would soon open upon
the enemy from our rear with shell, grape, and canister; that he
had ordered it for its moral effect. Gen. Hill had not passed on
more than 200 yards to our right when the battery did open, but
instead of reaching the enemy they threw their missiles into my
command, which was very annoying. I immediately galloped
back and soon had the firing stopped. A cavalry force here also
fired upon us through mistake, but fortunately, however, doing
us little damage. This error, too, I speedily corrected, and
moving on forward met and routed the Sixth Indiana Regt.,
taking some few prisoners, one of them being an orderly to Maj.
Campbell, commanding Sixth Indiana, and also 2 horses
belonging to the major. The engagement lasted about one hour,
resulting in the dislodgment of the enemy, who fell back in
confusion about three-quarters of a mile to the position in which
we attacked them on Sunday morning. We bivouacked upon the
ground for which the contest had been so hotly waged during the
day, the men suffering considerably during the night from cold,
their clothing being yet wet from wading Chickamauga Creek,
and no fires being allowed, owing to the close proximity of the
enemy.


My loss was slight, having but 2 men slightly wounded.

I cannot close my report of this engagement without remarking
that, from what I myself saw and from reports from others of the
brigade, Gen. Polk and staff acted with great coolness,
discretion, and gallantry.


On the next morning (20th), the command was awakened very
early, I anticipating that the battle would be renewed by daylight.
We, however, waited in suspense until about 9. 30 or 10 a. m.,
when we were called to attention and ordered forward. We very
soon found the enemy in a position strong by nature, and
rendered doubly so by breastworks of logs, rocks, and rails,
erected during the night. In fact, the position was almost
impregnable. While here Brig.-Gen. Polk rode up to me through
a shower of shot and shell, and ordered me to hold this position
and the day was ours, and right gallantly did my little command,
already reduced nearly one-half, comply with the orders given,
subjected as they were to a terrific fire from the front and a fire
enfilading us from the fortifications on our right. We held the
position as directed for about 2 1/2 hours, when
we were ordered back by Capt. King, of Gen. Polk's staff,
the other regiments of the brigade having retired a few minutes
previously. Many of my regiment had already exhausted their
ammunition. I retired in good order, the front and rear ranks
while retiring fighting alternately with the enemy. I succeeded in
bringing off all my wounded, but left those who were killed on
the field. We fell back a distance of about half a mile, when we
rested and replenished our ammunition.


Capt. Mitchell's company, being on the right and in a more
exposed position, suffered more severely than the remainder of
the regiment, and I must here add that, notwithstanding it was
the first engagement in which his command had participated,
both he and his company displayed much courage and gallantry.


Our loss here, as well as that of the whole brigade, was very
severe, fighting the enemy, as we did, not more than 70 yards
from his breastworks.


Between 3 and 4 p. m. the command was again called to
attention, and moved by the right flank in order to connect with
Gen. Jackson's left. Skirmishers were immediately thrown out in
advance and a forward movement commenced. Their skirmishers
were soon driven in, when we aging became generally and
fiercely engaged, they still holding the strong position in which
we had engaged them in the morning. They at this point poured
into us a most destructive fire from artillery and small-arms,
which broke our lines, driving our men back about 100 yards,
and a complete rout for a time seemed inevitable. I, however,
with the aid of Gen. Polk, Capt. King, and the officers of my
regiment, succeeded in rallying the men, and having reformed
our line moved forward to renew the attack. After advancing to
the brow of the hill, which was immediately in front of us, I
discovered that the regiment composing the left of Gen.
Jackson's command was considerably in our rear. I also
discovered that Calvert's battery, in our rear, was not engaged,
since, owing to the nature of the ground, it was impossible for
our artillery to render my efficient service from any position in
rear of our line of battle. The enemy's artillery was playing most
destructively upon our ranks, where upon I suggested to Lieut.
Key, commanding our battery, to plant one section upon the crest
of the hill, to which position I ordered it rolled by men from my
command as well as from the other regiments composing the
brigade.


This artillery did noble service in helping dislodge the enemy
from his first line of fortifications, dealing out destruction at
every discharge. They did noble service until they exhausted their
ammunition. During the progress of this artillery duel, my negro
boy having failed to bring up my sword, I took a pole or club
and with this drove up officers and men of my own command
who were shielding themselves behind trees, as well as those on
the left of the left regiment of Jackson's brigade. As soon as
Lieut. Key had exhausted all his ammunition, we moved forward
some 150 yards. Here Gen. Polk informed me that Col. Colquitt,
commanding the First Arkansas, had taken possession of the
enemy's first line of fortifications and was out of ammunition,
and for me to furnish him as far as possible, stating that he wished
me to hold the position I then occupied, and also Col. Colquitt to hold
highs until we were relieved by Gen. Maney's brigade. Gen. Polk then
rode back to request Gen. Maney to relieve us with fresh troops,
when I discovered the enemy wavering in the second line of
fortifications and deemed this
a favorable moment to advance, which I did in connection
with the remainder of the brigade. Before this, however, I had
sent Lieut.-Col. Martin, of the First Arkansas, to the officer in
command of the regiment on Jackson's left, who was still
lagging, with instructions to move his command forward. He
(the officer just referred to) not responding, I ordered Lieut.-Col.
Roberts, of my regiment, to deliver the same instructions. He
now moved forward a short distance, but again halted. I then
went to him myself, representing myself as Gen. Hill, and told
him to advance; that victory was in our grasp. He replied that he
was awaiting orders from his brigade commander. I told him that
he could retreat without orders, and that he could advance
without, and that I took the responsibility of ordering him to do
so. His men at this rose up and moved forward gallantly about
300 yards, when they again came to a halt. I again approached
him, demanding the cause. He replied that their ammunition was
exhausted. Seeing a willingness to advance on the part of the
officers and men, I told him that he needed no ammunition, but
to fix bayonets and charge, which they cheerfully did.


In the meantime, I had ordered my major to take charge of the
prisoners as they arrived, and not allow the men to be running to
the rear on the pretext of carrying back prisoners. He (the major)
collected and sent to the rear about 75. Just at this juncture Capt.
Douglas, commanding a Texas battery, came to me, asking if he
could be of any service with his battery. I had it placed in
position and ordered him to throw three shells into the ranks of
the routed enemy intending thereby to add to their confusion and
demoralization. They had the intended effect. Just at this time
Gen. Breckinridge rode up and requested me not to enfilade his
men. I replied that I would not. He immediately passed on to the
right. I, taking charge of Col. Colquitt's horse, rode forward
with the brigade to the Chattanooga and La Fayette road, where
you will recollect, general, you rode up amid shouts and
rejoicing. This closed the day's labor, and we here rested for the
night.


My loss in the series of engagements was 7 killed on the field
and 54 wounded, out of 215 men.


I have already made this report too long, but cannot,
nevertheless, close without speaking a few words in praise and
commendation of some of my officers and men.


Lieut.-Col. Roberts and Maj. Deakins did their whole duty in
commanding the skirmishers, both day and night and displayed
great coolness and courage throughout the entire engagement, or
series of engagements.


Capt.'s Newby, Kell, Mitchell, Blair, Alley, Cummings, and
Lieut.'s Barnes and Cunningham, commanding companies, with
Lieut.'s Summer, Boydston, Lewis, Mitchell, Masey, Taylor,
Richards, Hatfield, Bonner, Haston, Hamrick, Rawlings, and
Dyer, all acted well, performing their whole duty, as they had
done on many former occasions. In fact, all my officers, with
but two exceptions, did themselves great credit, while but few
exceptions can be made in the conduct and bearing of my men.
They are certainly entitled to a high degree of praise.


Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. J. HILL,
Col., Comdg. Thirty-fifth Tennessee Regt.


Capt. W. A. KING, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Polk's Brigade.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 181-51 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLII.
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 51.]
Thank you for these reports. I have just begun my research and these will be added to my files. Again this is much appreciated.
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,199
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#7
Thank you for these reports. I have just begun my research and these will be added to my files. Again this is much appreciated.
http://tngenweb.org/civilwar/35th-tennessee-infantry-regiment/

I actually had two 3 x 1st cousins (brothers) Jesse and William Land from Sequatchie County, Tn in 1st company K 35th Tn. They and their brother-in-law enlisted the same day. All three soon came down with measles and were furloughed home. Neither went back. William joined the Union 6th Tn Mounted Infantry and served with them six months, cleaning out the area of outlaw gangs made up of deserters from both sides.

Jesse Land.jpg

Jesse Land was 20 when he enlisted. He was present, rolls dated September. 6, 1861-Oct. 4, 1861, and March-June, 1862. He was sick at the hospital, October. 28, 1861. Land is listed as `deserted, September 8, 1862`, on the roll dated Nov.-Dec., 1862. Company H (1st Company K), 35th Tenn. This company was raised in Sequatchie Co. By Capt. W.D. Stewart, on September 6, 1861. The county soon came under Union control. Men " sick " or " furloughed " home soon found themselves behind Yankee lines with no way to rejoin their regiment.

william land.jpg


William Land

3-3-1865 to 6-30-65 mustered out at Nashville, Tn • American Civil War Union Soldier Enlisted at his home in Dunlap,Tn.
Former Confederate caught behind Union lines family lore says he joined the Yankee 6th Tn Mtd Infantry to protect his family They fought outlaw and bushwacker bands made up of deserters of both sides After the war he drew a Federal Pension

Here's another view of your ancestors' portrait :

P657540.gif
 
Last edited:

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Messages
17,620
Location
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#8
It's like Christmas, finding one of these isn't it? Thanks for posting it.

Rest of thread made me smile. Two Million plus men fought in the war. Relatives frequently show up here on CWT looking for one or asking if anyone knows something. Someone always does.
 

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