Federal Admiral David G. Farragut's Birthplace and Museum

Buckeye Bill

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#1

* David Glasgow Farragut's Birthplace at Stony Point in Campbell's Station (Modern Farragut), Tennessee.

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David Glasgow Farragut
(July 5th, 1801 – August 14th, 1870) was a flag officer of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay usually paraphrased as "**** the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition.

Born near Knoxville, Tennessee in Campbell's Station, Farragut was fostered by naval officer David Porter after the death of his mother. Despite his young age, Farragut served in the War of 1812 under the command of his adoptive father. He received his first command in 1824 and participated in anti-piracy operations in the Caribbean Sea. He served in the Mexican–American War under the command of Matthew C. Perry, participating in the blockade of Tuxpan. After the war, he oversaw the construction of the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, the first U.S. Navy base established on the Pacific Ocean.

Though Farragut resided in Norfolk, Virginia prior to the Civil War, he was a Southern Unionist who strongly opposed Southern secession and remained loyal to the Union after the outbreak of the Civil War. Despite some doubts about Farragut's loyalty, Farragut was assigned command of an attack on the important Confederate port city of New Orleans. After fighting past Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, Farragut captured New Orleans in April 1862. He was promoted to rear admiral after the battle and helped extend Union control up along the Mississippi River, participating in the Siege of Port Hudson. With the Union in control of the Mississippi, Farragut led a successful attack on Mobile Bay, home to the last major Confederate port on the Gulf of Mexico. Farragut was promoted to Admiral following the end of the Civil War and remained on active duty until his death in 1870. (Wikipedia) @KLSDAD

* The Civil War Trail's Marker (Admiral David G. Farragut's Birthplace).

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* Admiral David G. Farragut Statue Memorial Plaza.

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* Farragut Memorial Plaza.

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* Farragut Memorial Plaza.

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* The Farragut Birthplace Rock Memorial and Marker at Memorial Plaza.

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* The Admiral David G. Farragut Memorial Plaza Museum.

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* The Farragut Memorial Plaza Museum.

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* The Farragut Memorial Plaza Museum.

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* Admiral David G. Farragut Painting.

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#8
I grew up in Brooklyn NY and there was and still is a main road that is named Farragut Road. I knew that it was named after the Admiral Farragut but after reading his Bio he had no association or connection with Brooklyn NY. Does anyone have an explanation as to why a street would be named after someone that had no connection with the area be honored with the street name.
 
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#9
I grew up in Brooklyn NY and there was and still is a main road that is named Farragut Road. I knew that it was named after the Admiral Farragut but after reading his Bio he had no association or connection with Brooklyn NY. Does anyone have an explanation as to why a street would be named after someone that had no connection with the area be honored with the street name.
When i went to boarding school our school played football against Admiral Farragut Private school.
 

John Hartwell

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#11
I grew up in Brooklyn NY and there was and still is a main road that is named Farragut Road. I knew that it was named after the Admiral Farragut but after reading his Bio he had no association or connection with Brooklyn NY. Does anyone have an explanation as to why a street would be named after someone that had no connection with the area be honored with the street name.
He was a national hero. He and his name were honored all across the country. A city in Iowa, a state park in Idaho, among many schools, streets, squares, parks, etc, etc. Farragut is a neighborhood in Flatbush, Brooklyn.
 

Buckeye Bill

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Thank you Bill for another educational posting. I have never been there but have put this on my list of needed visitations.
We are all here to learn, my friend. Thank you for the kind words!

Bill
 

Buckeye Bill

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On this day in 1864, the United States of America Government honors David Glasgow Farragut's naval role by promoting him to the newly created rank of Vice Admiral. This naval rank is the equivalence to the army rank of Lieutenant General.

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#17
* David Glasgow Farragut's Birthplace at Stony Point in Campbell's Station (Modern Farragut), Tennessee.

View attachment 208656

David Glasgow Farragut (July 5th, 1801 – August 14th, 1870) was a flag officer of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay usually paraphrased as "**** the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition.

Born near Knoxville, Tennessee in Campbell's Station, Farragut was fostered by naval officer David Porter after the death of his mother. Despite his young age, Farragut served in the War of 1812 under the command of his adoptive father. He received his first command in 1824 and participated in anti-piracy operations in the Caribbean Sea. He served in the Mexican–American War under the command of Matthew C. Perry, participating in the blockade of Tuxpan. After the war, he oversaw the construction of the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, the first U.S. Navy base established on the Pacific Ocean.

Though Farragut resided in Norfolk, Virginia prior to the Civil War, he was a Southern Unionist who strongly opposed Southern secession and remained loyal to the Union after the outbreak of the Civil War. Despite some doubts about Farragut's loyalty, Farragut was assigned command of an attack on the important Confederate port city of New Orleans. After fighting past Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, Farragut captured New Orleans in April 1862. He was promoted to rear admiral after the battle and helped extend Union control up along the Mississippi River, participating in the Siege of Port Hudson. With the Union in control of the Mississippi, Farragut led a successful attack on Mobile Bay, home to the last major Confederate port on the Gulf of Mexico. Farragut was promoted to Admiral following the end of the Civil War and remained on active duty until his death in 1870. (Wikipedia) @KLSDAD

* The Civil War Trail's Marker (Admiral David G. Farragut's Birthplace).

View attachment 208657

* Admiral David G. Farragut Statue Memorial Plaza.

View attachment 208659

* Farragut Memorial Plaza.

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* Farragut Memorial Plaza.

View attachment 208661

* The Farragut Birthplace Rock Memorial and Marker at Memorial Plaza.

View attachment 208663

* The Admiral David G. Farragut Memorial Plaza Museum.

View attachment 208664

* The Farragut Memorial Plaza Museum.

View attachment 208665

* The Farragut Memorial Plaza Museum.

View attachment 208666

* Admiral David G. Farragut Painting.

View attachment 208667
Great pix, Bill. Have you got a closeup of the scrimshaw? I love that stuff.
 
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