Favorites from The Battle of Gettysburg

Nathanb1

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
32,904
Location
Smack dab in the heart of Texas
#41
Soldiers that fought at Gettysburg and their little known stories. Just recently I read about Pvt. Wilson J. Barbee Co L 1st Texas Infantry Regt "Lone Star Rifles" . At the time of the battle he had been detailed as a courier to his division commander. He rejoined his regiment during the fighting at Devil's Den where he climbed up on a high rock exposing himself to the enemy and opened fire. Wounded comrades kept passing him loaded muskets. He was wounded 3 times before the last wound caused him to fall from his perch. Pvt. Barbee was killed in the skirmish at Daindridge Farm Tn. He was awarded the Confederate Medal of Honor many years after his death. These stories I find interesting.
Great! Two of us know about Wilson and appreciate him!
 

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Jimklag

Lt. Colonel
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
9,911
Location
Chicagoland
#42
What stories or anecdotes about the three days of the Battle of Gettysburg are your favorites? Stories about parts of the battle, places on the battlefield, people (military or civilian) or animals in the battle, etc.? They could be well-worn tales, proven facts, or things handed down from relatives. What are your favorite tales, quotes, or lessons?
I've got no favorite anecdote or vignette, but I would love to have been a fly on the wall when Lee first spoke to Stuart on his belated arrival at Gettysburg.
 

JerseyBart

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
8,704
Location
New Jersey
#46
John Burns, veteran of the War of 1812 insisted on defending his hometown, Gettysburg. At first, Union officers refused, but finally he joined forces with the Iron Brigade. He was wounded, but the Rebels thought he was an innocent civilian and took care of him, even getting him home.
View attachment 125926
You gotta love John Burns!!!
 

dlavin

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
1,615
Location
North Balt Co., MD
#51
Not really sure if this question belongs here or not. So many Gettysburg threads, I wasn't really sure where to ask!

Did the 20th Maine really accept prisoners (mutineers) and all but 2 I think fought? I just can't remember reading anything about it. And of course its a big part of the movie Gettysburg. If this is true, this is a pretty big story...
 

jay gale

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Messages
1,681
Location
kirkland, washington
#52
There are a couple, oddly centered around the Wheatfield.

First one is Father Corby and his giving absolution to the Irish Brigade with Hancock riding up to witness it.

Second one is about Colonel Edward Cross and the bandana that he word in battle. Usually it was red, but on July 2nd he wore a black one as he had a premonition of his own death, he was mortally wounded and died on the 3rd.
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
33,526
Location
Right here.
#53
Not really sure if this question belongs here or not. So many Gettysburg threads, I wasn't really sure where to ask!

Did the 20th Maine really accept prisoners (mutineers) and all but 2 I think fought? I just can't remember reading anything about it. And of course its a big part of the movie Gettysburg. If this is true, this is a pretty big story...
The Second Maine men came over a month prior and were well integrated into the regiment by the time of the battle. It wasn't nearly as dramatic as the movie makes it seem.
 

dlavin

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Messages
1,615
Location
North Balt Co., MD
#55
The afternoon of day 1 has always intrigued me. Heth, Pender's attacks from AP Hill. Then Iverson's and Daniel's attacks from Ewells Corps. Also the railroad cut fighting has gained my attention.
 

ARW

Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 12, 2018
Messages
595
Location
Lebanon Pa
#56
I have three family stories about three 3x cousins who were there.

Granville S. Furman enlisted at Mehoopany, PA in the 143rd Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers in Company K under Captain Isaac S. Little on August 27, 1862. On the morning of the 1st of July it moved forward and soon the sound of artillery was heard, the cavalry under Buford engaging the enemy's advance. At a little before noon the brigade went into position upon a ridge beyond that on which the Theological Seminary stands, under a heavy fire, the One Hundred and Forty-third forming on the line of railroad.

Somewhere early in the fighting, Granville Furman was shot in the left foot. He told of sitting under a cherry tree eating the cherries and watching the battle go back and forth. Granville was in Satterlee General Hospital in Philadelphia from about July 10, 1863 until February 1, 1864 while the regiment joined in pursuit of the rebel army. (In doing some research I found that there were cherry trees near the house on the McPherson Farm)

Henry Wells enlisted in the 57th PVI in Aug 1861. At daylight of the 2d it moved to the front. Considerable time elapsed before the line was formed. Graham's Brigade was posted in the open field facing the pike. At four P. M. the enemy opened with artillery, and for an hour and a half the solid earth was shaken by his unceasing fire, the regiment being much exposed, and many being wounded by his bursting shells. As the fire ceased, the brigade moved forward and attacked the enemy's infantry, which was just then advancing from the wood beyond Sherfy's. It was soon hotly engaged, and for a time checked his advance. The right of the Fifty-seventh rested on Sherfy's house, in an admirable position, where the men could fire deliberately and with excellent effect. But the regiments farther to the left, failing to get into position in time, the enemy broke through, and flanking the position, caused Graham to fall back. A considerable number of the men had taken cover in an old cellar, and amidst the noise and confusion, did not receive the order to retire, nor notice the withdrawal of the rest of the regiment, but still kept up a rapid and most destructive fire. When too late, they discovered their isolated position, and were nearly all taken prisoners. Henry and the other enlisted men were taken to Belle Island and he was released from prison and mustered out Nov 1864. ( Side note Henry was the reason I found this site as I was researching what happened to POW's from Gettysburg)

John Durst enlisted in the 148th PVI Aug 1862 They were in the First Division 2nd Corp.
General Dan Sickles, without orders, moved his Third Corps forward to what is today known as the Peach Orchard. His troops put-up a strong fight, but faltered, and soon needed assistance from Second Corps. The First Division was detached, and sent in to assist General Birney's Division. The four brigades approached the Wheatfield. In the ensuing fight, the 148th would take a gallant part. The First Brigade was the first into battle. As the 148th entered the Wheatfield, the battle formation was confused. The hours and hours of drill, in which the battle formation of a regiment became so ingrained that soldiers could maintain it even in the fury and chaos of combat, were set aside. For Caldwell’s division in the Wheatfield, combat effectiveness would depend on the ability of veteran officers and soldiers to adjust under fire to their unfamiliar formation. After a short halt, the enemy was engaged. A volley was sent into their lines and under severe fire from the enemy, Brigade commander Cross was killed. At this point a number of soldiers were captured at a stone wall near large boulders at the edge of the woods. The 148th reached the far edge of the Wheatfield, where the fighting was ferocious. The entire brigade held, despite growing casualties and low ammunition. Finally, the Fifth Corps arrived. Part of the 148th was retired across the Wheatfield, and reformed behind a stone fence, just as the sun was beginning to go down. Part of the 148th and the 5th New Hampshire remained in position well after the brigade had been relieved.

The next day, the 148th was stationed to the left of the angle for Pickett's Charge, where they took over 400 enemy prisoners coming over their breastworks. John had survived the Wheatfield but was wounded in the leg on July 3rd. He was sent to the Cotton Factory G H Harrisburg but on 6 Oct 1863 he died due to infection.
 
Joined
Aug 1, 2018
Messages
11
#57
McPherson's Woods, my wife's gr gr gr gr gr grandfather's nephew, Lt. Crockett East, Co. K, 19th Indiana was killed there helping to shuck the battle flag. I took my son there last summer, had him read the account of Crockett's death, while he was standing in the woods. Crockett was shot in the head, his friend went back on July 5, and due to the condition of the body, they could only recognize him by the approximate location where he fell, and the sergeant chevrons he still wore. (his Lt. promotion had come, but still wore the chevrons at that time). it really made it even a more meaningful place with this knowledge.
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Messages
18,396
Location
Central Pennsylvania
#58
McPherson's Woods, my wife's gr gr gr gr gr grandfather's nephew, Lt. Crockett East, Co. K, 19th Indiana was killed there helping to shuck the battle flag. I took my son there last summer, had him read the account of Crockett's death, while he was standing in the woods. Crockett was shot in the head, his friend went back on July 5, and due to the condition of the body, they could only recognize him by the approximate location where he fell, and the sergeant chevrons he still wore. (his Lt. promotion had come, but still wore the chevrons at that time). it really made it even a more meaningful place with this knowledge.

I realize it's not realistic but frequently think a visitor's book should be somewhere at Gettysburg where those coming to ' see ' an ancestor could leave an account of who it was and a synopsis of their battle. It'd get long but could you imagine?
 
Joined
Aug 1, 2018
Messages
11
#60
I realize it's not realistic but frequently think a visitor's book should be somewhere at Gettysburg where those coming to ' see ' an ancestor could leave an account of who it was and a synopsis of their battle. It'd get long but could you imagine?
oh, can you imagine how interesting that would be to see?! (btw....Several of my wife's descendants are Iron Brigade, many of mine are Stonewall Brigade. Really makes my Civil War study interesting. Kind of amazing we got together, lol)
 



Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top