Favorite Songs - Part III

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I just stumbled across this musician, Jon Gromm (he's from Leeds, UK) on Russell Brand's youtube page, where a comment he wrote caught my interest. So I thought I'd check out his music and found that I liked it enough to share.


I think Glorybound would have liked this.
Thanks for posting this. I enjoyed it. His guitar reminded me of Willie Nelson's guitar.
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M.Warren

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I saw Steve Winwood Thursday night at The Space in Westbury, a block from my house. His encore included one of my favorites Dear Mr. Fantasy:

Love it Mr. Young! I remember this one from football practice in highschool. Listening to it on my walkman. Another of my favorites. I hope you have a good weekend sir.

 

Pat Young

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Last one. I promise. I had to post this one because these guys used to play a few hundred yards from my home on the side of King Street in Boone, NC. The same street and site Stonemans raid took place on March 28 1865.

Old Crow Medicine Show is an Americanastring band based in Nashville, Tennessee. Its music has been called old-time, folk, and alt-country. Along with original songs, the band performs many pre-World War IIblues and folk songs. It has recorded since 1998. Bluegrass musician Doc Watson discovered it while its members were busking outside a pharmacy in Boone, North Carolina[i 1] in 2000.[i 2] With an old-time string sound fueled by punk rock energy,[2][3] it has influenced acts like Mumford & Sons[4][5] and contributed to a revival of banjo-picking string bands playing Americana music[5]—leading to variations on it.

Very little in the way of Confederate defenses awaited Stoneman's men. Confederate home guardsmen were scattered about in various places such as Watauga County, where Major Harvey Bingham had two companies, or Ashe County where a Captain Price commanded a small company. The area had been placed under the direction of General P.G.T. Beauregard, but the regular troops in his command were described as 'insufficient to stop [Stoneman].'

Yet Stoneman would not march unopposed, as the people of Watauga County quickly demonstrated. At 10 a.m. on March 28, as the Federal forces moved on the Taylorsville turnpike toward the village of Boone, N.C., the troopers learned that a meeting of the local home guard would occur in Boone that same day. Stoneman quickly sent his aide-de-camp, with the 2nd Brigade's 12th Kentucky Cavalry, to assault Boone and take on the home guard. The Union troopers responded, riding into Boone and down Main Street, firing at anything that moved.

Mrs. James Councill heard the firing and stepped out onto her porch, her child in her arms, to investigate when 'a volley of balls splintered into the wood all around her.' Home guardsmen and citizens grabbed their weapons and tried to fight back. Steel Frazier, a 15-year-old boy, was chased by six Federals to a fence, where Frazier took cover, turned, and took on his pursuers, killing two of them. He then retreated into the woods. Calvin Green tried to surrender, but when the Federals continued to shoot at him, he resumed the fight and shattered the arm of one of the invaders with his musket.

Other citizens, however, weren't so lucky. Warren Green was shot to death as he tried to surrender; Jacob Councill, an elderly man over the conscript age, was shot down beside his plow despite his appeals for mercy. When the smoke cleared, the Federals had killed nine, captured 68, plundered several homes and burned the local jail.

With Boone neutralized, Stoneman decided to cross the Blue Ridge Mountains and move to Wilkesboro, about 50 miles away on the Yadkin River, to obtain supplies and fresh horses. He opted to separate his command to accomplish this, sending Gillem with Brown's brigade and the artillery, followed by Miller's brigade, on a roundabout route to Wilkesboro in order to destroy a factory near Lenoir. Stoneman would take the direct route, through Deep Gap to Wilkesboro.
http://www.historynet.com/major-gen...-the-last-american-civil-war-cavalry-raid.htm

Dylan wrote the Wagon Wheel chorus four decades ago.
 
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