Discussion Favorite Soldier

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Georgia Sixth

Sergeant Major
Joined
Dec 14, 2011
Location
Texas
Henry Stanley with the infantry from Arkansas. A decade later, he would to Africa to find a fellow named Livingstone. But at the time of the great disturbance, he and his Irish brogue were at the battlefield of Shiloh. His account is one of the best I've read. And his relief at being captured on the second day of battle is something with which I completely sympathize. You can read it here:
http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/shiloh.htm
 
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Cavalier

Corporal
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
My grandmother's uncle, Pvt. Daniel W. Lamson, 111th. New York

Wounded severely on July 2nd. 1863 at Gettsyburg in the attack of the 111th. New York upon regiments of Wofford's Brigade where, per their Colonel, the 111th. sustained 180 casualties out of 390 engaged.

He returned to the Army in time to be captured on June 5th, 1864. He ends up in Andersonville and dies in captivity.

How could I pick anybody else!

John
 
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Coonewah Creek

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2018
Location
Northern Alabama
It's hard not to go with your relatives. My great-grandfather and one of his older brothers served in the 2nd Mississippi. The older brother was killed at the Railroad Cut at Gettysburg. A second older brother served in the 31st Louisiana and was killed at Chickasaw Bluffs, either the 28th or 29th of December, 1862. My great-grandfather was wounded at least twice (documented) first at Sharpsburg (both legs) and then finally disabled at the Wilderness (wounded shoulder and face). Family tradition says he was wounded four times, but those are the only two I can document. So, my great-grandfather, Private Thomas Benton Weatherington (2nd Miss), Private George Washington Weatherington (2nd Miss), and Private John Andrew Jackson Weatherington (31st LA). Since my great-grandfather was the only survivor of the three brothers, I count myself lucky to be here.
 

DonnaT02

Private
Joined
Nov 27, 2019
It's hard not to go with your relatives. My great-grandfather and one of his older brothers served in the 2nd Mississippi. The older brother was killed at the Railroad Cut at Gettysburg. A second older brother served in the 31st Louisiana and was killed at Chickasaw Bluffs, either the 28th or 29th of December, 1862. My great-grandfather was wounded at least twice (documented) first at Sharpsburg (both legs) and then finally disabled at the Wilderness (wounded shoulder and face). Family tradition says he was wounded four times, but those are the only two I can document. So, my great-grandfather, Private Thomas Benton Weatherington (2nd Miss), Private George Washington Weatherington (2nd Miss), and Private John Andrew Jackson Weatherington (31st LA). Since my great-grandfather was the only survivor of the three brothers, I count myself lucky to be here.
Such brave men...all of those who have answered my question. Sadly, I'm only 2nd generation American so I have no relatives who fought in this war. I enjoyed reading all your accounts of your heroes. Thank you all for answering my question.
 
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Tin cup

Captain
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Location
Texas
This may have been more interesting if it was set for your favorite soldier on both sides! :wink:

Mine is Sgt Lyman S. Widney, 34th Illinois Vol Inf.

He signed up in 1861, went thru the war all the way to the surrender in 1865, as a Western Union soldier. Lyman went thru a lot of the big campaigns that took place out West. He wrote a diary of his typical soldier experiences, and some not so typical:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1425178871/?tag=civilwartalkc-20
Lyman Summerfield Widney, 34th Illinois Volunteer Infantry.jpg

Kevin Dally
 

UncleBourbon

Private
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Location
Massachusetts
If I had to choose then it'd probably be J. Rock Champion.
Reading about his exploits in The Siege of Lexington, Missouri: The Battle of Hemp Bales by Larry Wood was one of the most enjoyable parts of the book, and he seemed like quite the character.
I have no familial relation to him, however.
For a good coverage of his actions, there's this link,
and I strongly recommend reading the Battle of Hemp Bales book overall.

This may have been more interesting if it was set for your favorite soldier on both sides! :wink:
Excellent idea, however my favorite Union soldier was a sailor, Douglas R. Cassel, and if we're including Navymen then it'd be a very touch choice for me between Isaac Brown and Rock Champion.
In regards to Cassel, I visited his grave in Zanesville, Ohio on the same roadtrip I visited the Wilson's Creek National Battlefield on. Photo bellow,
Douglas Cassel grave 2019.png

Cassel fought at Mobile Bay and the Second Fort Fisher, however what I find most interesting about him is his post-war service.
He participated in the 1871 Korean Expedition, commanding artillery, and was hired by the Japanese government as an advisor for their 1874 Japanese Expedition to Formosa. He essentially commanded the Expedition in it's first few days and negotiated with the Natives. He (or James Wasson) also brought a Winchester along the Expedition.
He sadly died of malaria he caught from the Expedition, as far as I know the only non-Nisei American to die in Imperial Japanese military service.
For reading I recommend A Conspicuous Ornament: The Short, Eventful Life of Lt. Cdr. Douglas R. Cassel, U.S.N. (1845-1875)
By Roger D. Cunningham.

As with Champion, Cassel and Brown are not in my family.
 
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Tin cup

Captain
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Location
Texas
If I had to choose then it'd probably be J. Rock Champion.
Reading about his exploits in The Siege of Lexington, Missouri: The Battle of Hemp Bales by Larry Wood was one of the most enjoyable parts of the book, and he seemed like quite the character.
I have no familial relation to him, however.
For a good coverage of his actions, there's this link,
and I strongly recommend reading the Battle of Hemp Bales book overall.
OK, ya got me having to look into buying ANOTHER book! I almost wish you folk would stop doing this to me! :wink:

Kevin Dally
 

Hoseman

Corporal
Joined
Oct 20, 2016
Location
Virginia
This is a tough one as all my GGGrandfathers served in the CS army. They all served in VA regiments except for one and he was in a NC regiment. One of them was named Joseph McGavock Crockett from Wythe county, VA and he served in the 4th VA Infantry, Stonewall Brigade. He participated in most of the major battles with the ANV and with Jackson during the Valley Campaign. He was shot in the foot on Culp's Hill at Gettysburg and then lost an arm at Mine Run. He was affectionately nicknamed "One-armed Joe" for the rest of his life and is buried at Crockett's Cove, Wythe county, Virginia in the family cemetery.
 
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TomP

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 29, 2015
Location
Corinth, MS
I have 17 men from my family who served the Union. I am particularly partial to the two who fought at Shiloh. Sergeant (later Capt.) Judon McCoy of the 54th Ohio Infantry, my 3rd great uncle. Also my 3rd Cousin (X5) Ulysses S. Grant.
Judson.jpg
Grant.jpg
 
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