Favorite Non-National Park Service American Civil War Battlefield

Joined
Nov 2, 2016
Location
The Great State of GEORGIA!
Battle of Big Buckhead aka Buckhead Church and Big Buckhead Creek.
Remove the asphalt and GA Power lines....virtually "untouched" I've visited hundreds of ACW sites major and minor but, Buckhead Church and Creek, Perkins GA is truly the one ACW site where you feel the conflict. I mean there are hoof prints still visible in the church floor where horses were ridden inside, the pilings of the burned bridge are sometimes visible if creek water level dips, the morass is probably identical today as it was 153 years ago, the breastworks, rifle pits, top side artillery fragments are still there. To those who might visit please just visit and take pictures please don't take anything but photos and memories.
 

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JeffBrooks

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Location
Manor, TX
I would put Bentonville on the top of my list. I also might include Olustee down in Florida, where they have some some pretty good things on what appears to be a shoestring budget.

Has any one been to Raymond, MS? The park there is now the only Civil War battlefield park in the US to have a one to one ratio of artillery on display (on correct locations) with the actual artillery engaged.

I was at Raymond about a year-and-a-half ago. It's amazing that the sight even exists and it only does because of the dedication of a lot of citizen-activists. With a bit more funding, they could turn it into a thoroughgoing battlefield park.
 

BrianB

Corporal
Joined
May 16, 2014
I was at Raymond about a year-and-a-half ago. It's amazing that the sight even exists and it only does because of the dedication of a lot of citizen-activists. With a bit more funding, they could turn it into a thoroughgoing battlefield park.

Jeff- The key person is Parker Hills, a retired commander of the Mississippi National Guard. He has dedicated a number of years to make that park become a reality, and is very knowledgeable on the Vicksburg Campaign in general.

He did a thorough archeological sweep of the site several years ago, and got gps coordinates on hundreds of artifacts, which allowed him to locate the firing lines of several specific regiments.
 

gary

Captain
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Only been to a handful: Pamplin (excellent), Pickett's Mill (Georgia State Park and well worth the effort), Saylor's Creek (excellent job done by Virginia State Park System), Franklin (Carter House specifically), Nashville (go only in daytime, was told the fort gets overrun by druggies). I like to see Fort Blakely in Mobile and Port Hudson some day.
 

Lubliner

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Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
I have recently been reading Series 1 Volume 8 in the O. R. that covers the operations in Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, and Indian Territory from Nov. 19, 1861-April 10, 1862. The Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments are fully covered here.
Lubliner.
 

James N.

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I'd certainly agree that Perryville is probably the best-preserved and best-interpreted of the non-NPS parks! I recently revisited Prairie Grove Historic State Park, Ark. for the first time in years and was reminded what a fine little park it is too, with a host of reenacting associations for me.

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James N.

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I just remembered another very fine non-NPS site that has yet to be mentioned, the Third Winchester Battlefield at Winchester in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Unfortunately it only consists of the central portion of the complete battlefield and is somewhat remote for vehicular traffic - a good thing, historically speaking! It has several miles of walking trails and has been interpreted nicely.

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