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Father Tolton

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by archieclement, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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  3. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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    no idea who wrote the bio........

    "When they reached Hannibal they were accosted as runaways by some Confederate officials. They were on the verge of being handcuffed when some Union soldiers defended them with the claim that that section of town was outside Southern jurisdiction. It was not uncommon during the war to have a section of a city under Southern control and another section under Union control."

    Not aware of Hannibal ever being under dual control........Perhaps they mean civil and military control........however Missouri was a Union State and civil control wouldn't have been confederate control.....
     
  4. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Colonel Forum Host

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    " He was born of the marriage union of two slaves, Peter Paul Tolton and his wife Martha Jane, in Ralls County, Missouri, April 1, 1854. The slaveholders, the Elliots, had all their slaves baptized, including the Toltons and their four children. With the outbreak of the War between the States, Peter Paul hoped to gain freedom for his family and escaped to the North where he served in the Union Army. He was one of the 180,000 blacks who were killed in the war. "
    http://catholicism.org/father-augustus-tolton-first-black-priest-in-us.html

    Lengthy article here- thanks for the head's up! Crazy cool story!
     
  5. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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    I do have a question about it, but since its religion please try to be respectful and not go modern or off topic...

    It at least here seems common that slave-owners had their slaves attend and baptized it their own faith, My own local church which is a Christian Church, I'm aware pre war also had a slave gallery for the slaves to attend services.

    Was this common throughout the south?

    I ask because because from some of what I've read I had the impression the Episcopal faith was popular with a lot of the larger slave-owners in the south, yet It doesn't appear Episcopal ends up a common faith of ex-slaves.

    Some of these things aren't discussed alot on a national level, so one tends to only be more aware of their local area, with religion I'm never sure how upper south/border states compare to how it was done in deep south.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
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  6. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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  7. Carronade

    Carronade 2nd Lieutenant

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    That's approximately the number of blacks who served in the Union military. is there any indication that that number of blacks - northern, southern, military, civilian - were killed?
     
  8. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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    yeah its early, would be cool if the play took off to expose more people to the story, guess time will tell
     
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  9. John Hartwell

    John Hartwell Captain Forum Host

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    The only mention I can find of a Tolton in any colored unit, is a single mention of a John Tolton, Co. F, 1st USCI, in North Carolina in 1865 (a prisoner at Ft. Macon). Another card for a David Tolton corrects his surname to Thornton.

    There are a number of things wrong with the background history as related in these documents -- I suspect the writer(s) were not well read in history. But, this does not detract from their purpose of demonstrating the devoutness (the "holiness,' if you will) of Fr. Toton.
     
  10. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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    I agree, Hannibal was the eastern terminus of the Hannibal and St JO, it had the engine works and main rail yard, it was continuously garrisoned throughout the war, It was never even raided for a day by the confederates........it was never under "dual control".......as I pointed out it may have been divided at some point between civil and military, but as a union state the civil portion would have been Union control.........Yes the civil would have arrested and returned them, slavery was still legally protected in the United States, and the military would have broke US laws in aiding them.......however it wasn't uncommon for the military to do so, one of the reasons the citizens here didn't feel very "protected" by their presence, they were the ones more often then not stealing or aiding in the stealing of ones property..........

    Its odd neither account of the escape I read gave any dates of it, if they had I probably could have found if the garrison troops were from out of state which they primarily were earlier in the war......
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  11. James N.

    James N. Captain Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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    Many slaveowners - the future Stonewall Jackson being a notable example - thought that by exposing and inculcating Christian values to the slave population would "civilize" them, as long as it didn't give them any "dangerous" ideas; for example, Exodus wasn't thought a particularly good topic for sermons! Jackson went so far as to sponsor a Sunday school for slaves in his hometown Lexington. Although teaching slaves to read was illegal throughout the South, many ignored the law, thinking that slaves too should be able to read scripture.
     
  12. archieclement

    archieclement Sergeant

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    Do you know if the sunday school would have been Presbyterian as I believe stonewall was IIRC?
     
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  13. James N.

    James N. Captain Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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    Surely it must've been; he definitely was.
     
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  14. mofederal

    mofederal 2nd Lieutenant Member of the Month

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    I am a catholic, but being out of the loop, I had never heard of this story. It is interesting, and being from Northeast Missouri it is interesting to me. Thanks for posting Archie.
     
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  15. Patrick H

    Patrick H Captain

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    "Father Gus" (as he is known locally) has become rather famous in the mid part of Missouri because a new high school was built and named for him a relatively few years ago. It's located in Boone County, south of Columbia. Tolton High comes up on the news almost nightly because of their excellent sports teams. That has nothing to do with Father Tolton, of course, but I haven't heard any mention of his nomination for sainthood until reading this thread. That is truly interesting to me.
     
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