family heirloom confederate calvary sabre

Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
9,698
#61
Sorry but I refuse to be vilified for posting what have been quite cordial truths. :smile: While I fully accept the possibilities the sword was in the family for those generations preceding the ACW, my prompts have simply been to ask any not to build on speculations (which several have been wont to do so).

Conservation might be best affected by displaying it in a sealed case outside of the scabbard, clean and dry. As somewhat mentioned, the fitting is both upside down and backwards.

If I seem curt, I only apologize that I have been short because it is just another sword to me. The heritage is always laudable and more provenance can only help.

FWIW, one more correction for Patrick. The grip is bone and not ivory but I might as well go all in and be truly crucified for being correct :smile:

With that, I'll crawl back under my rock :wink:

Cheers
GC (Grumpy Cat aka Glen Cleeton)
It doesn't bother me that it's bone and I don't object to being corrected. Thanks. Relax, man...I don't think anyone is trying to vilify or crucify you. I don't think there's any need for that kind of sarcasm.
 
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Glen_C

Corporal
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
384
Location
Nipmuc USA
#62
It doesn't both me that it's bone and I don't object to being corrected. Thanks. Relax, man...I don't think anyone is trying to vilify or crucify you. I don't think there's any need for that kind of sarcasm.
Gawd Patrick! :D Then you continue? :wink: Consider I had not initially jumped you on bone vs ivory. Was it contempt, frustration, or just letting it go? It was the latter (believe me) until I was called out for an attitude check which honestly just pushes my snark button more :smile:

Bone is furry, Ivory is creamy goodness and the stuff on swords is ivory often thousands of years old from the tusker mines in Russia.
mowivory.jpg


In a previous post, the two swords I show being cleaned are ivory.

There are many guides on determining the differences
https://difference.guru/difference-between-ivory-and-bone/

Without judgement, I know many now use just their phones for browsing and participating on discussion boards and I truly do adjust my on expectations accordingly in that images make tips less apparent. It may also make it easier to just post for the heck of posting. I say make every post count and hopefully offer good information.

Cheers
GC
 
Joined
Mar 18, 2019
Messages
18
#63
@reidkrys
Henry A Gurkins' grandfather was Harmon (Herman) Gurkin, a veteran of the War of 1812. There are a couple of documents showing him as serving with the 5th Company, Martin County Regiment, NC. He is listed in the Muster rolls of the soldiers of the War of 1812 : detached from the Militia of North Carolina in 1812 and 1814

This might explain how Henry Gurkin came to be in possession of the sword. I still find it very plausible for him to have carried the sword in 1861 when his regiment initially mustered until the unit received arms.
Wow that incredible. We had no idea he was in the militia.
 
Joined
Mar 18, 2019
Messages
18
#64
Is there anybody or anyplace to send the sword to to get it in as good of shape as possible given it’s current condition? Are there any places that restore swords like a painting might be restored or conserved? I admit I know almost nothing and cannot express my profound gratitude for the knowledge and history that has been shared with me. It has been a truly remarkably revealing couple of days.
 
Joined
Sep 27, 2016
Messages
189
#67
Can someone familiar with eagle head swords point out to me some clues from the sword to pursue further? It has been said it is an infantry sword, how do we know that? I have heard that it wa common in the ACW for officers to arm themselves as the confederacy was more concerned with issuing guns and ammunition, is this true? Are there clues on the sword to pin it more closely to a potential maker and or smaller range of years in which it might have been made?
Glen is perhaps not the most polite minded on the internet (far from bad though), but he is really probably the most knowledgeable person on the boards for eagle headed sabres as far as I have seen, as well as on other boards.
 
Joined
Sep 27, 2016
Messages
189
#68
Is there anybody or anyplace to send the sword to to get it in as good of shape as possible given it’s current condition? Are there any places that restore swords like a painting might be restored or conserved? I admit I know almost nothing and cannot express my profound gratitude for the knowledge and history that has been shared with me. It has been a truly remarkably revealing couple of days.
I can personally attest to the quality of Tom Nardi, from his website. He does amazing work with grips and scabbards however I do not know if he cleans. It would be well worth sending him a message.

http://swordrestorationtn.com
 

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