2nd Manassas Eyewitness acct, 2nd battle of Manassas, part 1.

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Bonny Blue Flag

1st Lieutenant
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This is another cuttout from a newspaper, pasted into the pages of a journal I inherited from a g-g-g grandmother.

I labeled this "part 1" because the report takes 3 1/2 pages; 2 other parts will follow, typed up separately. Please note the "author" is notated only as P.W.A.

LETTER FROM P.W.A.
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BATTLE OF MANASSAS No.2.
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REVISED AND IMPROVED EDITION.
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ANOTHER BRILLIANT VICTORY.
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ENEMY ROUTED AT ALL POINTS.
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HEAVY LOSSES.
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BARTOW AND BEE AVENGED.
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&c., &c,. &c.
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BATTLE FIELD OF MANASSAS
AUGUST 31ST, 1862
Another great battle has been fought on the bloody plains of Manassas, and once more has Heaven crowned our banners with the laurel of victory. The conflict opened Frday afternoon, and last night not a Federal soldier remained on the South side of Bull Run, except the prisoners we had taken and those that sleep the sleep that shall know no waking until the great day of Judgement. The people of the Confederate States---those at home no less than the invincible heroes in the field, and the friends of justice and the lovers of liberty everywhere---assuredly have cause for rejoicing and thanksgiving. Never since Adam was planted in the garden of Eden, did a holier cause engage the hearts and arms of any nation; and never did any people establish more clearly their right to be freemen.
I did not arrive in time to witness the battle of Friday, the 29th,---Leaving Gordonsville at 9 o'clock that day, on a freight train, I reached Rapidan Station, the present terminus of the railroad, at noon. There I took horse, forded the river, struck for the Rappahannock--forded that river also---got to Warrenton at one o'clock yesterday---rested my horse, and then took the turnpike for the battle field, fourteen miles distant, where I arrived in one hour and fifteen minutes, and just in time to witness, for the second time, the triumph of Confederate arms on these memorable plains.
(The first few words of this sentence are illegible)--number of men engaged on either side. It is not probable, however, that the enemy had more than 75,000 troops on the field. Our own forces were conciderably less, a large part of the army not having arrived in time to participate in the fight. Longstreet's corps d'armee held the right. A.P. Hill's and Anderson's (late Huger's) divisions the centre, and Jackson's veterans the left. Jackson was the first to reach the plains below the Blue Ridge; Hill came next, and then Longstreet, who entered the Thoroughfare Gap. The enemy occupied the Gap with a full division, and seemed disposed to dispute the passage of our troops; but Toomb's and Anderson's Georgia brigades, which led the corps, made a bold dash and soon drove them away with but little loss. That was on Thursday the 28th~~Jackson had brought the enemy to bay between Gainesville and Groveton, two miles from the old battlefield, on the Warrenton turnpike--Knowing this, Longstreet pressed forward, and succeeded in getting into position on the right of the turnpike, in time to hold that part of our lines while Jackson engaged the enemy on the left.
It should have been stated that Longstreet played the enemy a clever trick before he left the South bank of the Rappahannock. Jackson and Hill having moved around by Sperryville above, he made feints at several fords on the Rappahannock as if he would cross over, and thus drew the attention of the enemy to those points, whilst he put his forces in motion and marched rapidly to the northward and around to Gainesville. So successful was the maneuvering that a late Northern paper now before me congratulates its readers upon the brilliant victory achieved by the Federals in driving us away from the fords!
The enemy advanced to the attack on Friday. he was probably aware of Jackson's comparative weakness. He soon discovered, however, that a heavy Confederate column (Longstreet's) had got into position on the right, and immediately commenced a retrograde movement. The battle, which was hotly contested for a time, in which the artillery took a prominent part, continued through the afternoon (the next 2 lines are illegible)--of the enemy along the entire line.--Jackon's forces were chiefly engaged, and behaved with their usual gallantry. This scene of the conflict was just in front of Gainesville and on the left of the Warrenton turnpike as you look towards Washington.
(I will continue the letter soon -- BBF)
 
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