Discussion Examples Of Regional Dialects During The Civil War?

Lusty Murfax

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Location
Northwest Missouri
So true.

Austin is ground zero for the ex-California folks moving into Texas.
San Antonio and Houston are probably tied for second place.

Dallas has been overrun as well !

:frown:

Thankfully, Fort Worth seems to be one of the last "big city bastions" in the great state of Texas !

From what I've heard, the California transplants are scared to death when they see
a herd of Texas Longhorn cattle moving casually on the street . . . making their way to the the Fort Worth Stockyards.

View attachment 396006
https://www.fortworthstockyards.org/

:rofl:
These cattle appear to be show animals. Wonder what the owners charge to display them at events.
 

lurid

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
I get the sentiment, but we’re not -all- bad here. There’s a few regular people remaining in this den of depravity.
California was the greatest state in the Union for decades. It's obvious that the Liberals ruined it. Their touchy-feely approach to crime management and their welfare state implemented by socialist politicians made it into another Venezuela. I was stationed at Camp Pendleton in the early 1990s, I loved it. Everybody loved it. What a shame.
Not everyone is California is bad, I'm thankful to know and call several my friends, its just all the bad ones moving to Texas, and probably had a had in California issues.
'My mother grew up in LA during its Golden Age: John Wayne, the Beach Boys and Ronald Reagan was the governor. She still talks about it. But she said that she would not even visit it nowadays.
 

Rusk County Avengers

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 8, 2018
Location
Coffeeville, TX
Agreed !

Most people don't realize California is one of our major agricultural states . . . and Im not talking about avocados & vineyards.

I have two long time friends from the San Francisco Bay area.
They are two of the nicest people I've ever met. ( they're brothers).


Culturally, we have never understood each other.
We come from two separate planets.

:bounce:

But those guys are great !

To quote my Mother on California,

"California, the land of fruits and nuts!"
 
California was the greatest state in the Union for decades. It's obvious that the Liberals ruined it. Their touchy-feely approach to crime management and their welfare state implemented by socialist politicians made it into another Venezuela. I was stationed at Camp Pendleton in the early 1990s, I loved it. Everybody loved it. What a shame.

'My mother grew up in LA during its Golden Age: John Wayne, the Beach Boys and Ronald Reagan was the governor. She still talks about it. But she said that she would not even visit it nowadays.

The current modern version of Al Jolson's "California Here I Come." Rated at least a PG-13

 

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
Thanks for the southern linguistics lesson, I know all about it but I'm too orthodox to even bring myself to even type that unorthodox jargon. I know that mama is sacred, her 15 phone calls everyday are a leading indicator that she is revered above what is normal :smile:.



And they use three exclamation marks like they are a middle school kid writing a 100 word essay trying to meet the word count and simultaneously trying to convince people how strongly they really feel about a topic. Like I said, I tried to expunge all that hillbilly/honky-tonk from her accent, it must of have worked somewhat. Thank God.
Exactly. I am glad that you picked up that.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
The current modern version of Al Jolson's "California Here I Come." Rated at least a PG-13

That's funny, sad ... and apparently very true these days .

Sorry @Cycom.
I can say that ... as we've always been 50th out of 50 states in everything (since 1865 anyway) and we do laugh at ourselves.


However, back to Southern accents:
@Booner explained our attitude very well with a Blake Shelton video :
MAY BE ANOTHER PG-13 VIDEO for some.

 
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Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
The addition of "and them" is very interesting to me, as that is exactly what my maternal Grandmother and my mother said! Born and bred in Buckinghamshire , England.
That is an interesting fact for me as well.

As you know ... back then ... we were not that far removed as subjects of the crown.
( 150 years perhaps ? )

With the exception of former enslaved Africans, the majority of Americans were still overwhelmingly of English, Scots and Irish ancestry. Naturally a lot of those dialects morphed into what was becoming various "American" accents.

My paternal Grandmother's family were from England. She was born in 1895 and died in 1980.
For the most part they "sounded" as Southern USA as anyone down here, but occasionally they would use a phrase that to this day I don't understand. ( Her maternal family were German ) but I never heard any German phrases.

My maternal Grandmother's family were from County Galway, Ireland.
They had a very pleasant (almost lyrical) accent.

But that would be for a separate "language barrier" thread.

:bounce:
 
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Sgt. Tyree

Private
Joined
Apr 29, 2020
Location
Wyoming Territory
Val Kilmer once opined that he needed to figure out what a southern aristocrat from that era likely sounded like for his portrayal of Doc Holiday. Apparently, he felt that listening to either a good ol’ boy or an educated Atlantan from today’s south wasn’t going to be the same thing.
 

J C J Barefoot

Private
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Agreed !

Most people don't realize California is one of our major agricultural states . . . and Im not talking about avocados & vineyards.

I have two long time friends from the San Francisco Bay area.
They are two of the nicest people I've ever met. ( they're brothers).


Culturally, we have never understood each other.
We come from two separate planets.

:bounce:

But those guys are great !
One of the old regional jokes on California: " Californians? They don't know what they want but they are real sure what they have ain't it."
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
I would encourage anyone interested in regional accents and dialects to take the time and view this video:

I enjoyed that video !

I've watched dozens of accent videos, but this is one of the most informative.

I'm looking forward to the remaining segments.
(They barely "scratched the surface" of our multiple accents).
 
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GwilymT

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
Will have to watch this after Lent. Thanks 👍🏼
Well, lent is almost over so dig in.

One of the most eye opening things for me was that accents are always changing. I think the answer has to be, no- we would not immediately recognize the accents of our civil war ancestors. What we consider a southern or northern accent today has changed and they are continuing to change. It was mentioned above about the Midwest/Chicago accent changing, that is touched on in the video. The point is that accents are constantly evolving so no, Shelby Foote does not sound like someone’s confederate ancestor and Daniel Day Lewis doesn’t really sound like Lincoln did.
 

GwilymT

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
I enjoyed that video !

I've watched dozens of accent videos, but this is one of the most informative.

I'm looking forward to the remaining segments.
(They barely "scratched the surface" of our multiple accents).
I never realized how complex it is. To think that they can pinpoint where vowel pronunciation changes, just south of Trenton NJ- but that only holds for the coast, further inland there are other differences. It’s fascinating and almost makes one want to take up linguistics.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
I never realized how complex it is
You are correct !

Regional accents around the world are very complex.
I doubt an outsider would be able to detect many differences down here, but locals sure can.

:laugh:


There are subtle accent differences even within my small state of Mississippi.

( And that applies to both Black and White dialects )

The most pronounced difference is our people from the northern part of the state (along the Tennessee border) " sound" nothing like our Gulf Coast residents that live less than 60 miles from New Orleans. But that's probably a topic for another accent thread.

The majority of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, West Tennessee, North Louisiana, and Southern Arkansas people "sound" the same to most visitors.
 
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Cycom

Private
Joined
Feb 19, 2021
Location
Los Angeles, California
Well, lent is almost over so dig in.

One of the most eye opening things for me was that accents are always changing. I think the answer has to be, no- we would not immediately recognize the accents of our civil war ancestors. What we consider a southern or northern accent today has changed and they are continuing to change. It was mentioned above about the Midwest/Chicago accent changing, that is touched on in the video. The point is that accents are constantly evolving so no, Shelby Foote does not sound like someone’s confederate ancestor and Daniel Day Lewis doesn’t really sound like Lincoln did.
Sunday, good sir, Sunday. I’m looking forward to stuffing myself with sugar laden treats then watching this at night when the kids are asleep.

Good point about the ever changing nature of accents. I think most people just assume that how people sounded a certain way always.
 
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