Enterprise Parole Camp (After Surrendering at Port Hudson)?

ToniH

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Jul 4, 2021
I have been unsuccessful at tracing what happened to my Civil War uncle who was captured at Port Hudson with Watson's Battery.

Mark Anthony Morse
DOB:
August 24, 1840 Algiers, Orleans, Louisiana
DOD: March 28, 1927 Algiers, Orleans, Louisiana

Enlisted: August 15, 1841 St. Joe, Tensas Parish, Louisiana
Watson's Battery Louisiana Light Artillery (unit transitioned to Heavy Artillery at Port Hudson)

Rank In: Corporate
Rank Out: Private

Per Mark's Pension Application (see attached)
Branch: Artillery. Also served under Admiral Buchanan at Mobile, and as a ship carpenter on Alabama River

If discharged or paroled where were you and what did you do at the close of the war?
Paroled at Mobile on May 19, 1865

Where did you surrender?
Doing steamboat service on Alabama River

If a prisoner, in what camp, and where were you released, and to where sent?
I was taken prisoner near the end of the War and was a prisoner when I was paroled.

Did you take the oath of allegiance to the United States Government at any time? If so, when and where?
No.


I am presuming that after surrendering at Port Hudson, Mark Anthony Morse would have been tasked to go to "Enterprise" parole camp. I have seen different accounts that not everyone was released from capture in July 1863 (some soldiers were held until 1864). I have also seen where not all released soldiers went to their parole camps after being released. Have not been able to find his name on any parole registry, so I'm wondering if he was one of the soldiers who just avoided the parole camp?

After his release, he noted that he served under Admiral Buchanan. My research has Admiral Buchanan responsible for the building and commanding the ram, CSS Tennessee, during the Battle of Mobile Bay. On August 5, 1864 Buchanan was on board the ship when he was wounded and taken prisoner.

I'm wondering if Mark Anthony Morse (who, according to some records was a shipswright) was onboard, as well. However, I am unable to find his name listed. Any suggestions as to where I can look to find out more details about Mark's journey after he left the Union (after Port Hudson)?

Thank you, again,
Toni Heitzmann

Mark Anthony Morse - Soldier's Application for Pension (Page 2).jpg


Mark Anthony Morse - First page of Soldier's Application for Pension.jpg
 

DixieRifles

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I am presuming that after surrendering at Port Hudson, Mark Anthony Morse would have been tasked to go to "Enterprise" parole camp. I have seen different accounts that not everyone was released from capture in July 1863 (some soldiers were held until 1864). I have also seen where not all released soldiers went to their parole camps after being released. Have not been able to find his name on any parole registry, so I'm wondering if he was one of the soldiers who just avoided the parole camp?
Are you referring to his parole in 1865? Camp at Enterprise was not used then. It was for the surrender of the soldiers at Vicksburg. They were held there until exchanged. Some were released in time for the Battle of Lookout Mountain on 23 Nov 1863 but others may have still been there in 1864.

In 1865, the Confederates surrendered and signed an Oath of Allegiance and were then allowed to go home.
 

ucvrelics

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I have done ex
I have been unsuccessful at tracing what happened to my Civil War uncle who was captured at Port Hudson with Watson's Battery.

Mark Anthony Morse
DOB:
August 24, 1840 Algiers, Orleans, Louisiana
DOD: March 28, 1927 Algiers, Orleans, Louisiana

Enlisted: August 15, 1841 St. Joe, Tensas Parish, Louisiana
Watson's Battery Louisiana Light Artillery (unit transitioned to Heavy Artillery at Port Hudson)

Rank In: Corporate
Rank Out: Private

Per Mark's Pension Application (see attached)
Branch: Artillery. Also served under Admiral Buchanan at Mobile, and as a ship carpenter on Alabama River

If discharged or paroled where were you and what did you do at the close of the war?
Paroled at Mobile on May 19, 1865

Where did you surrender?
Doing steamboat service on Alabama River

If a prisoner, in what camp, and where were you released, and to where sent?
I was taken prisoner near the end of the War and was a prisoner when I was paroled.

Did you take the oath of allegiance to the United States Government at any time? If so, when and where?
No.


I am presuming that after surrendering at Port Hudson, Mark Anthony Morse would have been tasked to go to "Enterprise" parole camp. I have seen different accounts that not everyone was released from capture in July 1863 (some soldiers were held until 1864). I have also seen where not all released soldiers went to their parole camps after being released. Have not been able to find his name on any parole registry, so I'm wondering if he was one of the soldiers who just avoided the parole camp?

After his release, he noted that he served under Admiral Buchanan. My research has Admiral Buchanan responsible for the building and commanding the ram, CSS Tennessee, during the Battle of Mobile Bay. On August 5, 1864 Buchanan was on board the ship when he was wounded and taken prisoner.

I'm wondering if Mark Anthony Morse (who, according to some records was a shipswright) was onboard, as well. However, I am unable to find his name listed. Any suggestions as to where I can look to find out more details about Mark's journey after he left the Union (after Port Hudson)?

Thank you, again,
Toni Heitzmann

View attachment 410445

View attachment 410446
I have done extensive research and excavation at the camps at Enterprise. There were 3 camps there during the CW. An enlistment camp (early war), a parole camp and a conscription camp. The original parole camp was established after the fall of Port Hudson and most of the enlisted men were sent but some were sent to Columbus, Miss. All the officers were sent to the US Customs House in New Orleans and then sent north. Your boy Mark was not at Port Hudson when it fell but on attached duty in Montgomery Ala building fortifications on the Alabama river and Mobile Bay. When the war ended in Mobile most CS troops went north to Meridian Miss as POW, the released. I have attached his records that show this.
 

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ToniH

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Are you referring to his parole in 1865? Camp at Enterprise was not used then. It was for the surrender of the soldiers at Vicksburg. They were held there until exchanged. Some were released in time for the Battle of Lookout Mountain on 23 Nov 1863 but others may have still been there in 1864.

In 1865, the Confederates surrendered and signed an Oath of Allegiance and were then allowed to go home.

Thank you for your quick response.
I was thinking that Mark was in Post Hudson, so thinking that when he left, he would be going to Enterprise.

How can I find out where he was working when he "served" with Admiral Buchanan (in Mobile)?
 

ToniH

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Joined
Jul 4, 2021
I have done ex

I have done extensive research and excavation at the camps at Enterprise. There were 3 camps there during the CW. An enlistment camp (early war), a parole camp and a conscription camp. The original parole camp was established after the fall of Port Hudson and most of the enlisted men were sent but some were sent to Columbus, Miss. All the officers were sent to the US Customs House in New Orleans and then sent north. Your boy Mark was not at Port Hudson when it fell but on attached duty in Montgomery Ala building fortifications on the Alabama river and Mobile Bay. When the war ended in Mobile most CS troops went north to Meridian Miss as POW, the released. I have attached his records that show this.
Thank you for your awesome feedback. I had these rosters, but when I read "Post Hudson", I didn't register the Montgomery, Alabama.

How were you able to discern that he worked on building fortifications on the Alabama River and Mobile Bay?

I greatly appreciate your guidance so that I can learn and share with my family.
 

ToniH

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Joined
Jul 4, 2021
Thank you, Gary. I had his CMSR (thank you, again, for supplying it). I took this CMSR "ticket" to be referring to the steps to paroling the surrendered Confederate fighters at the end of the War.

In his Pension Application, Mark stated that he was "doing steamboat service on the Alabama River" at the time of the surrender. However, he then states that he "was taken prisoner near the end of the war".
 

ToniH

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Joined
Jul 4, 2021
Thank you all for your help. I also appreciate receiving the CMSRs. I had CMSR copies, but I apparently need I learn how to read the CMSRs in order to correctly obtain their data.

I'm trying to find out:
1) What he was doing between 1861 and 1865 (the end of the Civil War)?

We had been following the CMSR "tickets" and his attachment to 'Watson's Battery Louisiana Artillery' (and all of their battles, including Post Hudson). However, "Professor" ucvrelics (I will gladly be your Civil War student) stated that "Mark was not at Port Hudson when it fell but on attached duty in Montgomery, Ala building fortifications on the Alabama river and Mobile Bay". With that info, it looks like I'm starting over (tossing aside all Watson's Battery battle details given to elder relative to enjoy), but that's okay. I rather have the correct information than enjoying and sharing the wrong information. :smile:

  • The 'Sept. 1 1862' CMSR "ticket" has Mark with Captain A.A. Bursley's Co (Watson Battery)

  • The 'Sept. and Oct. 1862' CMSR "ticket" has Mark with Captain A.A. Bursley's Co (Watson Battery), Louisiana Artillery. Lists Mark "Absent - detached service". Could this be where he started his

  • The only CMSR "ticket" for 1863 is for a "List" dated May 18, 1863 (just before the Battle of Post Hudson took place) has the "List dated" location as 'Post Hudson May 18, 1863'. However, the "Remarks: At Montgomery, Alabama" seem to co-


2) Where I can find such sources of info?
The CMSRs are so hard to read sometimes (visually and interpreting what the tickets are implying). Is there a guide in how to read/interpret them and other Civil War documents?
 

ucvrelics

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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
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Location
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I apparently need I learn how to read the CMSRs in order to correctly obtain their data.
Lets see if we can clear it up a little. keep in mind that a LOT of CS records were lost or destroyed so info can be spotty which you are finding out. Normally unit muster were suppose to be filled out every 2 months and they would show where the unit is at the time not the soldier, those were put in the remarks column for that soldier such as present or in this case on attached duty.

What he was doing between 1861 and 1865 (the end of the Civil War)?

In late 1862 the unit was in Jackson Miss and Holly Springs Miss
Unit Information(1).jpg
Unit Information(2).jpg

Morse's record for that time show him as on attached duty more than likely this is where he started his service for Adm Buchanan,
In August 1862, Buchanan was promoted to the rank of full admiral – the only officer so honored in the Confederate Navy – and was sent to take command of Confederate naval forces stationed at Mobile Bay, Alabama.[5] He oversaw the construction of the ironclad CSS Tennessee, of which the keel was laid in October 1862. He was on board Tennessee during the Battle of Mobile Bay with Rear Admiral David Glasgow Farragut's Union fleet on August 5, 1864.[6] Wounded and taken prisoner, Buchanan was not exchanged until February 1865.[6] He was on convalescent leave until the Civil War ended a few months later.

The only CMSR "ticket" for 1863 is for a "List" dated May 18, 1863 (just before the Battle of Post Hudson took place) has the "List dated" location as 'Post Hudson May 18, 1863'. However, the "Remarks: At Montgomery, Alabama"

This ticket states Port Hudson which is were Morse's parent unit was at the time and he was on attached duty in Montgomery, Ala. I would say that due to his experience with the heavy guns and ships carpenter he was involved in the construction of the CSS Tennessee as well as building fortifications at Choctaw Bluff on the Alabama river as well as at Nanna Hanna Bluff on the Tombigbee river. He would also be involved with the work in and around Mobile Bay.

When Mobile fell he was captured and the ticket states paroled at Mobile. Pay no attention to the Meridian part as that is just where CS Gen Taylor and US Gen Canby held the formal surrender (paperwork) of all the troop in the Dept of the Gulf.

Hope this helps clear up some of your questions.
 

ToniH

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Joined
Jul 4, 2021
Thank you, Professor! You are my hero!!!!!😀😀😀

I have been looking for a note indicating a response, but have not seen one. I decided to take a chance to see if anyone had responded the comment. Yes, I still need to learn how to use this website.

I wanted to make sure that I could understand your writing before getting back to you. Thankfully, I understood all of the historical notes (I better, after all of the reading I have been doing over the past few months).

I want to thank you for taking the time to work with me to know that I was on the right track to finding a history. I just needed a "filler".

Take care...
 
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