Enrolled Missouri Militia question

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Booner

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When I was a young man I rented a farm between Boxford and Cosby on Third Fork River bottoms. The farm straddled the joint boundary between Andrew and DeKalb Counties. This County line boundary is a section of the eastern boundary of the Platte Purchase Territory. While plowing on the bottom, I unearthed several large limestone boulders. They appeared to be cut or hand hewn and were generally situated on the County line. Dad looked at them and said they were ballast rocks brought up-river and used by the 19th century survey crews to mark the County boundary.
Well, Of course I know where Cosby is, but I've never heard of Boxford. And the Third Fork River bottoms must be the 3rd fork of the Platte River? If so, the farm must have been close to Hwy 31?

Question for you-- You know Camp Highly (a MSM requitment camp), was just on the outskirts of Helena. The Federals had a camp too, but further east in DeKalb County. I've never heard where that camp was, but I assume it must be pretty close to your farm? It seems there was an informal agreement between the commanders of the two camps not to "bother" each other. The MSM of Camp Highly were equipped, at least partially, from the guns stolen from the Independence Armory, and they ended up going down to Lexington and taking part in that siege.
 

TnFed

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I recall that they used a series of blockhouses near railroads and communication centers, they would place them about a thousand yards apart with barb wire placed between them at a zigzag, so the soldiers would not fire directly toward each other when the Boer tried to get through. My understanding is they dotted a large part of the area. I'm not really an expert on the subject. I believe the British started to use them when De Witt and others resorted to guerrilla war.
Corection.. De Wet
 

Booner

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I recall that they used a series of blockhouses near railroads and communication centers, they would place them about a thousand yards apart with barb wire placed between them at a zigzag, so the soldiers would not fire directly toward each other when the Boer tried to get through. My understanding is they dotted a large part of the area. I'm not really an expert on the subject. I believe the British started to use them when De Witt and others resorted to guerrilla war.
As far as I know, the blockhouses would be located close to a railroad bridge, perhaps one at each end of the bridge, and would provide a fortification for the troops garrisoned there in case of an attack. Since the blockhouses were located at bridge crossings, they wouldn't be close enough to each other to support each other. In some cases, the blockhouse may have had a substantial amount of trench works close by for additional defensive support.
 

Booner

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I recall that they used a series of blockhouses near railroads and communication centers, they would place them about a thousand yards apart with barb wire placed between them at a zigzag, so the soldiers would not fire directly toward each other when the Boer tried to get through. My understanding is they dotted a large part of the area. I'm not really an expert on the subject. I believe the British started to use them when De Witt and others resorted to guerrilla war.
So if I understand you, the British has a series of block houses close enough together to provide mutual support for each other. If that's correct, no that wasn't done.
However, the Feds did do something like that in Western MO in the summer of '63 in combating guerrillas along the MO/KS border. Gen. Ewing came up with the idea whereby he would have a system of garrison towns 10-15 miles apart, with a company of cavalry stationed at each place. The idea that when one of the cavalry companies came in contact with guerrillas, other cavalry companies could ride to their support, and hopefully encircle and eliminate the guerrillas. The plan never worked as intended. The hit and run tactics of the small guerrillas kept the cavalry in constant motion, exhausting the men and horses, so they very rarely were able to bring their superior numbers to bear.
 

Lusty Murfax

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Well, Of course I know where Cosby is, but I've never heard of Boxford. And the Third Fork River bottoms must be the 3rd fork of the Platte River? If so, the farm must have been close to Hwy 31?

Question for you-- You know Camp Highly (a MSM requitment camp), was just on the outskirts of Helena. The Federals had a camp too, but further east in DeKalb County. I've never heard where that camp was, but I assume it must be pretty close to your farm? It seems there was an informal agreement between the commanders of the two camps not to "bother" each other. The MSM of Camp Highly were equipped, at least partially, from the guns stolen from the Independence Armory, and they ended up going down to Lexington and taking part in that siege.
The farm is south-southeast of Helena, south of Rte. V and just east of Rte. UU blacktop. In the years just before and during the war, my Missouri ancestors were living in Andrew, Atchison, Buchanan, Platte and Clay Counties. Some of my Mother's people were in Boone Co. One of my GX3 Grandpas owned a farm in DeKalb Co., but his family lived on his other farm up in Atchison Co. near Rock Port. The local Yankees burned them out and they fled to northwest Arkansas, stayed down near Pea Ridge until the war was over, then returned to the DeKalb Co. farm. I have no idea where the Union recruiting camp in DeKalb County was. My German ancestors didn't arrive in DeKalb Co. until about 1869, after the Austrian Emperor allowed some of the Sudetenland farmers to leave for America.
 

Si Klegg

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This is a wonderful thread. Great info & images about the Paw-Paws. It's a fascinating aspect of the war for me. My first re-enactment unit was Co. E, 18th Missouri Volunteer Infantry and I have Prof. Anders book - indeed, I corresponded with him in the 1990's and he kindly sent me copies of Muster Rolls and Reports from his research.

The first burning of Platte City in 1861 particularly interests me. It is quite a story. The callous executions of two of the three prisoners Black Triplett and Gabriel Close at the Bee Creek bridge by the 18th's commander Col W. James Morgan was a shameful episode by the Union soldiers. The account by the surviving prisoner William Kuykendall is illuminating, expecting to be murdered at any point. Morgan did wonders for Confederate recruitment by his actions apparently until relieved of duty in Feb 1862 and replaced by Col. Madison Miller of Shiloh fame.
 

archieclement

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were these blockhouses used like what the British did in the Boer War?
Here they weren't that extensive, one block house at one end of a bridge, their primary purpose was to just prevent small parties or an individual from burning the bridge. They are mentioned but not much in the way of descriptions of detailed use. Not sure if the garrisons were withdrawn when larger parties of the enemy were present.

I've always thought it seemed a lot of effort for no more then what it amounted to.

It seems a the blockhouse would house a garrison of 20-30 men who would rotate men as pickets on each side of the bridge, the block house would provide some fortified cover and cover fire for the few pickets if needed.. Just seemed a lot of work to construct, rather then just having them camp there.
 
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TnFed

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So if I understand you, the British has a series of block houses close enough together to provide mutual support for each other. If that's correct, no that wasn't done.
However, the Feds did do something like that in Western MO in the summer of '63 in combating guerrillas along the MO/KS border. Gen. Ewing came up with the idea whereby he would have a system of garrison towns 10-15 miles apart, with a company of cavalry stationed at each place. The idea that when one of the cavalry companies came in contact with guerrillas, other cavalry companies could ride to their support, and hopefully encircle and eliminate the guerrillas. The plan never worked as intended. The hit and run tactics of the small guerrillas kept the cavalry in constant motion, exhausting the men and horses, so they very rarely were able to bring their superior numbers to bear.
 

TnFed

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Thanks. I am in no way an expert on the war. My area of knowledge...if it can be called that...is partisan and guerrilla war in the border area of TN NCand GA. Missouri also interest me though I am not very informed on it.
The British also used mounted infantry type units to chase the highly mobile Boers from their blockhhouses
That and a scorched earth policy...concentration camps, etc...would finally bring in the hardcore guerrilas..
Dr Wet, De la Rey, Botha and others. Thank you . This is a very interesting thread.
 

TnFed

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Here they weren't that extensive, one block house at one end of a bridge, their primary purpose was to just prevent small parties or an individual from burning the bridge. They are mentioned but not much in the way of descriptions of detailed use. Not sure if the garrisons were withdrawn when larger parties of the enemy were present.

I've always thought it seemed a lot of effort for no more then what it amounted to.

It seems a the blockhouse would house a garrison of 20-30 men who would rotate men as pickets on each side of the bridge, the block house would provide some fortified cover and cover fire for the few pickets if needed.. Just seemed a lot of work to construct, rather then just having them camp there.
Were these enrolled milita exempt from federal and confederate draft?
 

archieclement

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Were these enrolled milita exempt from federal and confederate draft?
They would be exempt from Confederate draft as was a Union state, not sure if it was set up to provide exemption to Federal as the EMM I believe was mandatory for "loyal" Missourians
 
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Booner

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Were these enrolled milita exempt from federal and confederate draft?
From wikipedia regarding the EEM:

" compulsory militia enrollment was declared on July 22, 1862, the Enrolled Missouri Militia.[6] Schofield issued General Orders No. 19 requiring loyal men to enroll in the militia, required registration of all who had previously taken up arms against the United States, and for them to surrender their weapons. The disloyal and Confederate sympathizers would not be required to enroll in the militia, but would have to declare their sympathies, which many were unwilling to do and instead enrolled"

This was one reason why the "Paw Paw" Militia was unique, as it was made up of men with known southern ties which would have disqualified them from the reguler EEM. Some of the men were known Bushwhackers.
 

archieclement

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From wikipedia regarding the EEM:

" compulsory militia enrollment was declared on July 22, 1862, the Enrolled Missouri Militia.[6] Schofield issued General Orders No. 19 requiring loyal men to enroll in the militia, required registration of all who had previously taken up arms against the United States, and for them to surrender their weapons. The disloyal and Confederate sympathizers would not be required to enroll in the militia, but would have to declare their sympathies, which many were unwilling to do and instead enrolled"

This was one reason why the "Paw Paw" Militia was unique, as it was made up of men with known southern ties which would have disqualified them from the reguler EEM. Some of the men were known Bushwhackers.
But here is the catch as I understand it....Towards end of 1861 the Union offered amnesty to those who had joined the MSG, because it was a legal call by a sitting elected state Government, they could return home if they took an oath of Loyalty. Men also who had been arrested on various "suspicions" and held until taking the oath were now also required to serve In the EMM as all "loyal" Missourians were required to join. Anyone who been coerced into the oath was required to. Many had viewed the oath as a parole....a promise to not bear arms against the United States, not as a requirement to bear arms against the other side

The few remaining Missourians who hadn't taken sides or been required to take an oath could claim exemption.....if they wanted to become targets of the militia...……

So a bunch took to the brush with either the guerrillas or recruiters, while others joined the EMM to avoid suspicion although their hearts obviously weren't in the cause.

Getting ready to go on vacation this week, but will look for an account by wanting to say a MSM officer, but may have been EMM that accounts how most his command is "unreliable" other then to fight in very narrow specific conditions.....basicly they would only fight guerrillas not from their area, the ones from around home were OK by them as were the confederate recruiters
 
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TnFed

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But here is the catch as I understand it....Towards end of 1861 the Union offered amnesty to those who had joined the MSG, because it was a legal call by a sitting elected state Government, they could return home if they took an oath of Loyalty. Men also who had been arrested on various "suspicions" and held until taking the oath were now also required to serve In the EMM as all "loyal" Missourians were required to join. Anyone who been coerced into the oath was required to.

The few remaining Missourians who hadn't taken sides or been required to take an oath could claim exemption.....if they wanted to become targets of the militia...……

So a bunch took to the brush with either the guerrillas or recruiters, while others joined the EMM to avoid suspicion although their hearts obviously weren't in the cause.

Getting ready to go on vacation this week, but will look for an account by wanting to say a MSM officer, but may have been EMM that accounts how most his command is "unreliable" other then to fight in very narrow specific conditions.....basicly they would only fight guerrillas not from their area, the ones from around home were OK by them as were the confederate recruiters
This kind of sounds like some Tn Mounted Infantry units. Things were in total chaos, especially after Vicksburg. Some people join thinking their family could get a pension if things went wrong.
 

TnFed

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From wikipedia regarding the EEM:

" compulsory militia enrollment was declared on July 22, 1862, the Enrolled Missouri Militia.[6] Schofield issued General Orders No. 19 requiring loyal men to enroll in the militia, required registration of all who had previously taken up arms against the United States, and for them to surrender their weapons. The disloyal and Confederate sympathizers would not be required to enroll in the militia, but would have to declare their sympathies, which many were unwilling to do and instead enrolled"

This was one reason why the "Paw Paw" Militia was unique, as it was made up of men with known southern ties which would have disqualified them from the reguler EEM. Some of the men were known Bushwhackers.
Thanks. I will see if I can find some books on this subject. It sounds a lot like what my ancestors did in East Tn. I have read a couple of books on the James boys and Quantrel both pro and con but do not really have much knowledge on how things were.
 

Booner

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Thanks. I will see if I can find some books on this subject. It sounds a lot like what my ancestors did in East Tn. I have read a couple of books on the James boys and Quantrel both pro and con but do not really have much knowledge on how things were.
Imo, "The Devil Knows How To Ride" by Edward Leslie is perhaps the most objective look on Quantrill, and the four volume series "Guerrila Warfare in Civil War Missouri" by Bruce Nichols does a very good job of covering the guerrillia war throughout the entire state. Quantrill gets all the press, but there was so much guerrila activity throughout the entire state that rarely gets mentioned and deserves more attention. The guerrillia war in the state is our one claim to fame with regards to the greater Civil War. We had three wars going on at once here, so it was very brutal, but we were a backwater to the larger war, so we're often overlooked.

I see you recently joined the forum. Welcome! New blood is always welcomed.
 

TnFed

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Imo, "The Devil Knows How To Ride" by Edward Leslie is perhaps the most objective look on Quantrill, and the four volume series "Guerrila Warfare in Civil War Missouri" by Bruce Nichols does a very good job of covering the guerrillia war throughout the entire state. Quantrill gets all the press, but there was so much guerrila activity throughout the entire state that rarely gets mentioned and deserves more attention. The guerrillia war in the state is our one claim to fame with regards to the greater Civil War. We had three wars going on at once here, so it was very brutal, but we were a backwater to the larger war, so we're often overlooked.

I see you recently joined the forum. Welcome! New blood is always welcomed.
Thanks, it all seems a tad confusing in Missouri but I can relate to it. I Had ancestors in the 3rd. Tn Mounted Infantry USA
and 3rd Tn Mounted Infantry CSA.Who were around the same area shooting at each other.
 

Jcrofutt

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The earlier EMM members/soldiers had no real uniforms and supplied their own weapons. They were also called the Paw Paw Militia. They would put Paw Paw leaves in their hats as an identification. They were extremely unreliable and therefore suspect by many. Later on when it became the Provisional Enrolled Missouri Militia they were issued US issued uniforms.
The PEMM was a separate organization from that of the EMM. Yes, the PEMM had full uniforms and equipment just like U.S. Volunteers. But by the year 1864, any regular unit of the EMM that had been activated for 30 days or more were also issued U.S. Blue, although it was not the high-quality items, those being saved for the U.S. Volunteers. My ancestor was a Paw Paw out of Andrew County.
 

Jcrofutt

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Go with a mix of civilian and military clothing, and a mix of civilian and military weapons.
By 1864 any EMM unit that was activated for 30 days or more were issued standard Federal Blues. I would stay away from any type of hat brass or trimmings. Most of what they would have received would have been the old and outdated stuff that would have been deemed unsuitable for the regular U.S. Volunteers. However, still would have been Bluejackets and sky-blue trousers. Hats most likely a mixture of civilian style and military. I do think the uniforms had to be turned back in once they were no longer on active duty though. My ancestor was in the 81st EMM (Paw Paws) and 1 of his muster rolls list their uniforms as - Army Blue!
 
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