US Con Eliot, Thomas Dawes - U.S. Congressman, MA

Thomas Dawes Eliot

:us34stars:
1623860147578.png


Born: March 20, 1808

Birthplace: Boston, Massachusetts

Father: William G. Eliot 1781 – 1857
(Buried: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)​

Mother: Margaret Greenleaf Dawes 1789 – 1879

Wife: Frances Lincoln Brock 1815 – 1900
(Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, New Bedford, Massachusetts)​

Children:

Caroline Dawes Eliot Stetson 1835 – 1921​
(Buried: Rural Cemetery, New Bedford, Massachusetts)​
Paul M. Eliot 1837 – 1862​
(Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, New Bedford, Massachusetts)​
Ida Mitchel Eliot 1839 – 1923​
(Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, New Bedford, Massachusetts)​
Margaret Dawes Eliot 1842 – 1843​
(Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, New Bedford, Massachusetts)​
Emily Lamb Eliot Sturgis 1851 – 1892​
(Buried: Fell overboard on the S.S. Plymouth)​

Political Party: Whig Party, Free Soil Party and Republican Party

Education:


1825: Graduated from Columbian College​

Occupation before War:

1831 – 1854: Attorney in New Bedford, Massachusetts​
1839: Massachusetts State Representative​
1846: Massachusetts State Senator​
1854: Elected to congress to fill term of Zeno Scudder’s resignation.​
1854 – 1855: United States Congressman from Massachusetts​
1854: Denounced the Kansas – Nebraska Act​
1854: Choose not to be a candidate for reelection to U.S. Congress.​
1855 – 1859: Attorney in New Bedford, Massachusetts​
1855: Delegate to Free Soil Party Convention in Worcester, Massachusetts​
1857: Declined to be Republican Candidate for State Attorney General​
1859 – 1869: United States Congressman from Massachusetts​
1859 – 1867: Member of House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee​

Civil War Career:

1861: Author of legislation to prohibited American vessels from engaging in trade that brought coolies to the United States.
clip_73573184.jpg
1862: Introduced one of the first Emancipation bills in Congress.​
1863 – 1865: Member of House Treasury Department Expenditures​
1864: Chairman of House Committee on Emancipation of Slaves.​
1864: Introduced bill for establishing Freedmen’s Bureau​
1865: Voted in support of the 13th​ Amendment to Constitution.​
1865: Delegate to national meeting to establish a formal Unitarian denomination.​

Occupation after War:

1867 – 1869: Chairman of House Freedmen’s Bureau Committee​
Presided over first annual meeting of National Conference of Unitarian Churches.​
President of the American Unitarian Association​
1868: Declined to be candidate for reelection to U.S. Congress.​
1868: Voted in support of impeachment of Andrew Johnson​
1869 – 1870: Attorney in New Bedford, Massachusetts​

Died: June 14, 1870

Place of Death: New Bedford, Massachusetts

Age at time of Death: 62 years old

Burial Place: Oak Grove Cemetery, New Bedford, Massachusetts
 
Last edited by a moderator:

steamboater

Private
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Location
CO Rockies & So. Arizona
I was surprised that The Mercury obituary include information as to his owning a policy of life insurance, the amount, and even who the insurer happened to be. In your study of the era, was this a common practice, one of telling the world the financial dealings of the deceased?

Also, any idea of the present value of $5,000 in the 1870's? TNX
 
Top