Edward Josiah Hatcher from the Georgia's 5th Regiment, Company A Clinch Rifles.

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M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
Dear Hatcher's Run;

I shall be researching for your ancestor and post what has been found in this thread sir.

Target for search: Edward Josiah Hatcher from the Georgia's 5th Regiment, Company A Clinch Rifles.

(Others are welcome to join me in digging all the information for Hatcher's_Run/Bill. )

Respectfully submitted,
M. E. Wolf
========================================
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 8 [S# 8]
FEBRUARY 28--APRIL 8, 1862.---Operations at New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, and descent upon Union City, Tenn.
No. 36. -- Report of Brig. Gen. E. W. Gantt, C.S. Army
HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE,
Madrid Bend, Mo., March 17, 1862.
SIR: About midnight on the evening of the 12th instant firing on our picket lines in front of Fort Thompson was announced to me, and shortly afterwards a courier came, in notifying me that some movements of the enemy (who, you are aware,were in force some two and a half miles from us for more than a week) were about taking place. I dispatched discreet scouts from my command to repair there at once and ascertain definitely, if possible, the character of the enemy's movements.
[excerpt]
In obedience to instructions from General Stewart I ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Miller to remain quietly in the rifle pits, with six companies under his command, and Colonel Smith to take seven companies of the Eleventh Arkansas and press his way quietly as close up to the enemy's lines as he well might, so as to keep back the enemy's pickets, who, just looking around, had fired upon ours. This he executed promptly and effectively, the only difficulty he experienced being to restrain his men from precipitating themselves upon the enemy, regardless of numbers. I then, with the aid of Captain Hatcher, roused up the seven remaining companies and the two companies of artillery, and put them under charge of officers to remove the stores from the fort to the boat. My first effort, however, was to get the guns on board. After we had succeeded in getting two of them to the river a terrible and almost unprecedented storm came up, and rendered it impossible to remove the others. The mud and water soon became so deep as to render the road to the river next to impassable. I then directed the removal of all the stores of every kind that could be placed on board.
[end of excerpt]
---------------------------------------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 8 [S# 8]
FEBRUARY 28--APRIL 8, 1862.---Operations at New Madrid, Mo., and Island No. 10, and descent upon Union City, Tenn.
No. 36. -- Report of Brig. Gen. E. W. Gantt, C.S. Army
ATLANTA, GA. August 27, 1862.
Major-General POLK, Chattanooga, Tenn.:
DEAR SIR For more detailed account of my course and conduct at and during the evacuation of New Madrid I beg leave to refer you to Captain Hatcher, who is now, I am told, on General Stewart's staff. He was with me all the day; we lay down together at night, were asleep at 9 or 10, when the messenger came to us. He will tell you that I never even had an opportunity of becoming intoxicated.
I only saw General Stewart when he first came and once afterward, when I told him he could not get the guns away. I last saw him on Captain Carter's boat. We lamented the loss of the guns. Captain Carter seemed much mortified. General S. remained with Captain C. I took my blankets and went down to the steamboat Louisville. This was after we landed and about 4 o'clock a.m.
This is a strange accusation to have been brought against me. In all my life put together of wine and ardent spirits I never drank so much as one gallon; with all opportunities, I have not tasted even the lightest drink for four months. I could never accustom myself to it. It has only been in extreme cases, since in the service, that I have touched it. I am determined to be put right in this thing.
My kindest regards to Colonel Richmond.
Very truly, yours,
E. W. GANTT.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/1 [S# 12]
MAY 31- JUNE 1, 1862-- Battle of Fair Oaks, or Seven Pines, Va.
No. 110. -- Report of Brig. Gen. Samuel Garland, jr, C. S. Army, commanding Third Brigade, Third Division.
[excerpt]
Thirty-eighth Virginia.
Company K.--Sergts. G. W. Morrison and C. C. Marshall; Privates John Burlington, E. H. Estes, R. J. Hatcher, and John R. Billings; Corpl. R. C. Fortune, killed. (The officers commanding Companies A, B, E,and F are now absent, wounded; they may have names to present hereafter.)
(Distant relative perhaps?)
------------------------------------------------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/1 [S# 12]
MAY 5, 1862.--Battle of Williamsburg, Va.
No. 64. -- Report of Brig. Gen. Ambrose P. Hill, C. S. Army, commanding First Brigade, Second Division.
[excerpt]
Among those who by the fortune of war were most prominently brought forward and noticed are Captain Simpson, Cadet J. Herbert Bryant, acting adjutant; Color-Sergeant Hatcher, and Color-Corporal H. H. Bradley.
Private Travers, of Company H, took a stand of colors with his own hands.
This regiment mourns the loss of three gallant officers----Captain Humphreys, Lieutenants Addison and Carter--all of the Seventeenth.
Captain Mitchell, of the First, received the swords of two officers, and Cadet Thomas H. Mercer, assigned to the First, was remarked both by his regimental commander and myself for coolness and daring.
=====================================================
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/2 [S# 13]
PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN--SEVEN DAYS' BATTLES
No. 214. -- Reports of Brig. Gen. William N. Pendleton, C. S. Army, commanding Reserve Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia, of operations June 26-July 2.
My own route along the crest brought me about 9 a.m. to a point below Dr. Friend's house, whence, with a field glass, I distinctly saw the enemy in very large force and in battle order upon an open slope, some 2 miles below Dr. Gaines' farm, and portions of our own troops gradually advancing, as if feeling their way along the difficulties of the left bank. The powerful array of the former and the cautious progress of the latter induced me at once to send a duplicate dispatch, through the nearest general, to the commander-in-chief, notifying him of the observed position and strength of the enemy. My two aides, Acting Lieut. Charles Hatcher and Cadet Taliaferro, who bore these dispatches across the difficult swamp, deserve honorable mention for the alacrity, resolution, and success with which they performed the task.
======================================
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XX/1 [S# 29]
DECEMBER 26, 1862-JANUARY 5, 1863.--The Stone's River or Murfreesborough, Tenn., Campaign.
No. 201.--Report of Brig. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart, C. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade.
[excerpt]
cannot close this imperfect sketch without expressing my obligations to the gentlemen who served on my staff, and who made themselves so intelligently useful and efficient, regardless of danger, viz: Col. [Capt.] W. M. Reed, assistant adjutant-general; Capt. R. A. Hatcher, aide-de-camp; Capt. John A. Lauderdale, formerly of the Fifth, a volunteer aide; Maj. L. W.Finlay of the Fourth, and Lieut. Paul Jones, jr., of the Thirty-third, supernumeraries by the amalgamation of their regiments with others, but who preferred to be in the field. These officers, and Private Frank C. Usher, of the First Tennessee, acting as orderly, were active and efficient, and contributed not a little to the ease and facility with which I was enabled to handle the brigade.
--------------------------------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
MARCH 23, 1863.--Skirmish on the Little River Turnpike, near Chantilly, Va.
No. 3.--Report of Capt. John S. Mosby, Virginia Cavalry, including operations March 16-April 1.
[excerpt]
Privates Hart, Hurst, Keyes, and Davis were wounded. The latter has since died. Both on this and several other occasions they have borne themselves with conspicuous gallantry. In addition to those mentioned above, I desire to place on record the names of several others, whose promptitude and boldness in closing in with the enemy contributed much to the success of the fight; they are Lieutenant [William H.] Chapman (late of Dixie Artillery), Sergeant Hunter, and Privates Wellington and Harry Hatcher, Turner, Wild, Sowers, Ames, and Sibert. There are many others, I have no doubt, deserving of honorable mention, but the above are only those who came under my personal observation.
===================================================
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/2 [S# 44]
JUNE 3-AUGUST 1, 1863.--The Gettysburg Campaign.
No. 574.--Reports of Col. Thomas T. Munford, Second Virginia Cavalry, commanding Fitz. Lee's brigade, of engagement at Brandy Station and action at Aldie.
FREDERICKSBURG, VA.,
August 7, 1863.
MAJOR: I have the honor to report that, on the morning of June 17, at Upperville, Fauquier County, Va., I received a verbal order from the major-general commanding to move with my regiment and the Third Virginia Cavalry (Col. Thomas H. Owen) to Aldie, and establish a picket, covering the Snickersville [?] Gap and Aldie pike, and to go into camp at some point near by.
Arriving at Middleburg, I sent forward a picket under Lieutenant [A. U.] Hatcher, Company A, Second Virginia Cavalry, with instructions to hold his reserve on the heights and in front of Aldie, and to have his picket at the intersection of the Leesburg and Little River pike, with vedettes well out on each road. Three miles below Middleburg, I moved the command across to the Snicker's Gap pike, remaining on the pike myself, and sent the command to Mr. Franklin Carter's, to feed their horses and to bring corn enough for night and morning before we went into camp.




Continued
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVIII/1 [S# 46]
AUGUST 17-DECEMBER 31, 1863.--Bombardment of Fort Sumter, S.C.
No. 4.--Reports of Col. Alfred Rhett, First South Carolina Artillery, commanding Fort Sumter, of operations August 12-September 4.(*)
[excerpt]
August 19.--An attempt was made last night to get one of the disabled 10-inch columbiads ready for shipment, but it was found to be impossible.
The enemy opened fire again this morning at 4.30 o'clock, and up to the present time, 9.10 a.m., 245 shots and shells have been fired; 140 struck outside, 77 inside, and 28 passed over.
Casualties: Private [William] Fink, Company K, killed; Private [Jacob] Probst, Company K, severely wounded twice; Private [Z.] Holmes, Company K, slightly wounded; Private [Edward] Hatcher, Company K, slightly wounded; Corporal [C. P.] Barnett, Company C, slightly wounded.
All gorge guns useless.
August 19, 9.50 a.m. (telegram).--We need all the garrison we have to hold the fort, and are short of officers. The firing this morning is the heaviest yet and the walls are seriously damaged. One killed and 4 wounded this morning. All gorge guns useless. Middleton went to town last night.
August 19, 10.50.--The first shot has passed through the gorge [wall], coming out of the room on the right of the adjutant's office. The room is known as General Ripley's room (10 o'clock and 20 minutes). Shot struck close under the arch where there is little sand.
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXX/2 [S# 51]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 22, 1863.--The Chickamauga Campaign.
No. 369.--Report of Maj. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart, C. S. Army, commanding division.
[excerpt]
Maj. R. A. Hatcher, assistant adjutant-general, than whom there is not a more active or faithful officer in the service, displayed throughout his usual intelligence, promptness, and cool courage.
[excerpt]
On Saturday I was also well served by Mr. John E. Hatcher, a volunteer aide, and Private John M. House, a clerk in the adjutant-general's office.
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVII/1 [S# 70]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, MAY 1 TO JUNE 30, 1864.(*)--#9
HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY BRIGADE,
Falls Church, Va., June 5, 1864.
Lieut. Col. J. H. TAYLOR,
Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff:
COLONEL: I have the honor to report everything quiet in this vicinity during the last twenty-four hours. Major Forbes returned with his mounted party from Middleburg and Rector's Cross-Roads last night, bringing five rebel hostages (Hamilton Rogers, Dr. Powell, Gurley R. Hatcher, Noland, and Hooper). This party did not see a single guerrilla. The dismounted party which acted with it met a squad of five rebels and wounded two of them, but they got off. This party has not yet returned; it was to bring in more hostages from above Dranesville. The regular scouting party which was relieved this p.m. brought in Fenton Beavers and the two Gunnells, of Mosby's command, who have been making themselves very obnoxious recently as horse-thieves. Beavers is the same man who feigned desertion from Mosby some two months ago, and, after taking the amnesty oath and spying about Alexandria and Vienna, returned to the enemy. These three men, with two Bowies from Maryland and a man named Campbell, are the party which, under orders from Mosby, seized Walters and Dr. Lloyd. I think that these gentlemen will both be back within a day or two.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
C. R. LOWELL, JR.,
Col. Second Massachusetts Cavalry, Comdg. Cav Brig.
-----
Medical/Surgical History--Part II, Volume II
Chapter IX.--Wounds And Injuries Of The Upper Extremities.
Wounds And Operations In The Forearm.
Hatcher, T., Pt., G, 19th Ohio. May 27, 27, '64. Died May 27, 1864.
-----------------------------------
Medical/Surgical History--Part II, Volume II
Chapter IX.--Wounds And Injuries Of The Upper Extremities.
Section IV.--Injuries Of The Shaft Of The Humerus.
Hatcher, L, Pt., C, 57th Pennsylvania, age 40. May 5, 6, '64. Left; circular. Disch'd June 1, 1865; pensioned.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Medical/Surgical History--Part II, Volume II
Chapter IX.--Wounds And Injuries Of The Upper Extremities.
Section IV.--Injuries Of The Shaft Of The Humerus.
Hatcher, R, Pt., F, 24th Alabama. Sept. 19, 19, '63. Right. Recovered.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Medical/Surgical History--Part II, Volume II
Chapter IX.--Wounds And Injuries Of The Upper Extremities.
Section IV.--Injuries Of The Shaft Of The Humerus.
Hatcher, V., Pt, A, 12th Virginia. Died September 25, 1862.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Navy O.R.-- Series 1--Volume 22 [S# 22]
West Gulf Blockading Squadron.
From January 1, 1865, To January 31, 1866. pp. 156-201
Letter from the Acting Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear-Admiral Thatcher, U. S. Navy, regarding claims for damages from shots fired at the ram.
NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 2, 1865.
SIR: The Department has received your letter of the 6th ultimo (No. 99), in relation to the damage done to the property of individuals by shots fired at the rebel steamer Webb.
Claims for damages so caused can not be adjudicated and settled, either by the commander of the squadron or the Department, and the claimants must apply to some other tribunal or to Congress.
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
G. V. Fox,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.
Acting Rear-Admiral H. K. HATCHER,
Commanding West Gulf Squadron, New Orleans.
-----
Italics - CSA

Only close one was Edward Hatcher in Blue

Search will continue :smile:
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
Confederate Military History search for:
Edward Josiah Hatcher from the Georgia's 5th Regiment, Company A Clinch Rifles
===================================================
The Life and Campaigns of Major-General J.E.B. Stuart
Roll Of The Second Regiment Virginia Cavalry.
2d Lieutenant, ARNER N. HATCHER, mortally wounded at Tom's Brook, October 9, 1864.
[excerpt]
PRIVATES
HATCHER, JNO. A., died in 1861.


----------------------------------------------------------
Southern Historical Society Papers.
Vol. XV. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1887.
Paroles of the A.N.V.--Artillery Corps.
LIST OF MEN
Detailed and serving at the headquarters of W. N. Pendleton, Brigadier-General and Chief Artillery, April 9th, 1865.
Chas. Hatcher, private, vol. aid, 4th Reg't Va. Cavalry.
----------------------------------------------------
Southern Historical Society Papers.
Vol. XV. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1887.
Paroles of the A.N.V.--Artillery Corps.
NORFOLK BLUES ARTILLERY
Roll of Capt. C. B. Griffin's Company--Salon F. Artillery.
J. W. Hatcher,Private
-----------------------------------------------
Southern Historical Society Papers.
Vol. XV. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1887.
Paroles of the A.N.V.--Bratton's Brigade.
Second South Carolina Rifles.
Co. D.
A. J. Hatcher,
J. L. Hatcher,

----------------------------------------
Southern Historical Society Papers.
Vol. XV. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1887.
Paroles of the A.N.V.--Early's Division.
Fifty-eighth Virginia Regiment.
Co. H.
J. W. Hatcher,
----------------------------------
Southern Historical Society Papers.
Vol. XV. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1887.
Paroles of the A.N.V.--Evans' Brigade.
I certify, on honor, that of the above number of men, there were present, actually armed and in line of battle, four officers and thirty-four enlisted men on the morning of the 9th instant, the day of the surrender of this army.
JAMES KNOX, Capt. Com'd'g Reg't.
Thirty-first Georgia Regiment.
Co. C.
W. J. Hatcher,
-------------------------------------------
Southern Historical Society Papers.
Vol. XV. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1887.
Paroles of the A.N.V.--Misc.
Officers and Men of First Company, Independent.
Peter C. Hatcher,
-------------------------------------------
Starting Search for GEORGIA 5th - Clinch Rifles
Confederate Military History, Vol. 6
CHAPTER I.
[excerpt]
About 1 o'clock on the night of the 23d of January, I received from the war department the following reply to my telegram:
Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second Artillery, Commanding Augusta Arsenal, Georgia:
The governor of Georgia has assumed against your post and the United States an attitude of war. His summons is harsh and peremptory. It is not expected that your defense shall be desperate. If forced to surrender by violence or starvation, you will stipulate for honorable terms and a free passage by water with your company to New York.
J. Holt, Secretary of War.
To have resisted such a force, then ready to attack me, with my knowledge of large reinforcements at Savannah and Atlanta ready to come up by rail at a moment's warning, would have been desperation in my weak position. I therefore directed my adjutant to address and convey the following note in reply to the governor's demand:
Headquarters Augusta Arsenal, January 24, 1861.
Col. H. R. Jackson, Aide-de-Camp:
Sir: I have the honor to inform you that I am directed by Captain Elzey, commanding this post, to say, in reply to the demands of the governor of Georgia, made through you yesterday, requesting him to withdraw his command beyond the limits of the State, he begs to request an interview with his excellency the governor, for the purpose of negotiating honorable terms of surrender at as early an hour this morning as practicable.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
J.P. Jones, Lieutenant Second Artillery, Post Adjutant.
About 10 o'clock of the same morning the governor, accompanied by his staff and Brigadier-General Harris, commanding the troops, rode up to my quarters, and were received by me, when the following honorable terms were agreed upon and executed:
"His excellency the governor of Georgia, having demanded the United States arsenal at Augusta, commanded by Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second artillery, United States army, the following terms are agreed upon, to wit: .
"(1) The flag to be saluted and lowered by the United States troops. (2) The company to be marched out with military honors and to retain its arms and company property. (3) The officers and soldiers to occupy quarters until removed beyond the limits of the State, and to have the use of the post transportation to and from the city and in the neighborhood, and the privilege of obtaining supplies from the city. (4) The public property to be receipted for by the State authorities, and accounted for upon adjustment between the State of Georgia and the United States of America. (5) The troops to have unobstructed passage through and out of the State by water, to New York, via Savannah.
JOSEPH E. BROWN,
Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Army of the State of Georgia.
ARNOLD ELZEY,
Captain Second Artillery,Commanding Augusta Arsenal.


On January 23d, when Captain Elzey's answer remained in doubt, some 800 volunteers of the city were put under arms, and others came in from the country. The Augusta volunteers engaged in the capture of the arsenal consisted of the following companies: Oglethorpe Infantry, Clinch Rifles, Irish Volunteers, Montgomery Guards, two companies of minute men (one of which became the Walker Light Infantry), Washington Artillery and Richmond Hussars. The ranks of these companies had been swelled by young men eager to serve their country, until they averaged 100 men each. They were splendidly equipped and thoroughly drilled. In addition to these there were about 200 mounted men from Burke county and a company of infantry from Edgefield district, South Carolina. Brigadier-General Harris was in chief command, aided by Brig.-Gen. Charles J. Williams, of Columbus; and Lieut.-Col. Alfred Cumming was in immediate command of the armed force, consisting of the Augusta battalion, Companies A and B of the minute men, and the militia. No hostile demonstration was to be made until the 24th, and it was then happily obviated by the reasonable action of Captain Elzey. In the conference which fixed the terms of the withdrawal, the governor was accompanied by Generals Williams and Harris, Col. W. H. T. Walker, and his aides, Colonels Jackson and Phillips, all of whom joined the governor in assurances of their esteem of Captain Elzey, and a desire that the unhappy difficulties which had arisen might be adjusted without hostilities. Walker, a comrade of Elzey in the Federal service, seized the latter's hand and assured him that he had done all that could be required of a brave man. Elzey, overcome by the situation that presaged the breaking up of the old army, and the deadly conflict of former friends, could only reply by silently throwing his arm around his comrade, while tears filled the eyes of those who witnessed the scene. Walker began here an honorable career in the Confederate cause, became a major-general, was distinguished for his reckless daring, and finally gave his life in the great battle on the hills of Atlanta. Elzey also entered the Confederate service as soon as circumstances permitted, and was one of the most distinguished representatives of Maryland in the army of Northern Virginia. His cool and intrepid action on the field of First Manassas won for him the rank of brig-adier-general and the title of "the Blucher of the day" from the lips of President Davis. Under Jackson he achieved additional renown and was promoted major-general, but wounds received before Richmond in 1862 deprived the cause of his further active service in the field.

[Search will resume when able -- So far nothing specificly identifying your relative sir.. but, I am not done.--M. E. Wolf]

So far: I am having 'issues' :D with a brief mention of Clinch Rifles and just 'disappears.' I looked at 2nd/Second Georgia Battalion Sharpshooters (which would make sense)...and there is no 'history' of them (so far in my files) or...that Clinch Rifles was designated to another title/label, e.g. 2nd GA BATT S.S., etc. I also am not finding much 'meat' to the Fifth Georgia Regiment aka 5th Georgia Regiment, that would connect with the Rifles/Sharpshooters. The 5th GA Regiment was detailed for a while guarding prisoners at Andersonville.

I'm not done raking through, cross checking, etc.
 
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M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
CLINCH RIFLES

http://www.aug.edu/~liblsc/Grant/Clinch_Rifles/Clinchdescription.html

Clinch Rifles, Augusta, Georgia.(1851-1861) ,80-10.
Reese Library. Augusta State University, Augusta, Ga.


Summary.Roster Book.


Access.No Restrictions.


Microfilmed.(Date)


Citation.Clinch Rifles Roster Book, 1851 - 1861, 80-10.Reese Library Manuscript Collections, Augusta State University, Augusta, Georgia.


Biographical/Historical Note.


The Clinch Rifles were organized as a militia company on March 22, 1851, from the Clinch Engine Company No. 2.The company was named for General Duncan L. Clinch the commander at the Battles of Withlacoochee [December 31, 1835] and The Cove [March 31, 1836] of The Seminole Wars.The company adopted the motto “Charge Again” after General Clinch’s order at the Battle of Withlacoochee [near the present town of Dunnellon, Florida] to attack the enemy again. This second attack routed the enemy and won the battle.


The Clinch Rifles served during the War of Northern Aggression as Company A, 5th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry.


The Clinch Rifles Minute Book was a gift from Mr. I. Clarence Levy and Mr. Addison Weisinger, Jr. on September 7, 1948.
--------------------------------------------------------
See if the librarian can peek into the roster roll to see if your relative(s) are there before buying the book and going from there.

However, it has been the most positive result in the 'nitty gritty details.'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://civilwartalk.com/forums/reenactors-forum/28010-5th-georgia-infantry-co-clinch-rifles.html

Is a thread by a re-enactor who adopted your ancestor's group - Clinch Rifles. May want to read it ... Handy.Harris started the thread.
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
http://www.researchonline.net/gacw/rosters/5thcoma.htm

Has the roster - your relative is listed:

MUSTER ROLL OF COMPANY A, 5th REGIMENT
GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
ARMY OF TENNESSEE
C. S. A.
RICHMOND COUNTY, GEORGIA
"CLINCH RIFLES"

Listed among the 24 companies organized and sent to the Field from Augusta and vicinity during the Civil War was "Clinch Rifles", 94 men. A total of at least 30 companies were raised in Richmond County during the four Years of he war - no less than 2,000 men. Of these, 292 were killed or died in service.


OFFICERS:
Platt, Charles A. - Captain
Ansley, David Henry - 1st Lieut.
Adam, Jacob W. - 2d Lieut
Day, Charles B. - Jr. 2d Lieut.
Rowland, Samuel H. - 1st Sgt.
Adam, George - 2d. Sgt.
McGregor, Malcolm T. - 3d Sgt.
Holland, Gilbert G. - 4th Sgt.
Bones, Thomas M. - 1st Cpl.
Tutt, Daniel William - 2d Cpl.
Brown, Sumner W. - 3d Cpl.
Bones, John Samuel - 4th Cpl.
Whiting, Herman G. - Musician
Clark - Amos K. - Musician
Parkyn, Hugh H. - Musician
PRIVATES:
[excerpt]

Hambrick, J. W.
Harris, John S.
Harris, Thomas J.
Hatch, Albert J.
Hatcher, Edward J.
Hawley, Samuel B.
Hiller, William J.
Holt, Alfred C.
Hold, Benjamin R.
Hopkins, Thomas N.
House, Samuel
Huckabay, James G.
[excerpt]
------------------------------------------------------------
Georgia 5th Infantry Regiment




ORGANIZATION:

Organized May 11, 1861
Company L. organized April 19, 1862
Company N. organized May 16, 1862
Companies H, L, & N became Companies A, B, & C of the 2nd Sharpshooters Battalion on July 18, 1862.
Reorganized on May 8, 1862
Surrendered - Durham Station, Orange County, NC - April 26, 1865
---------------------------------------------
<LI about="r4">BiosPageH.html

William Hatcher, Merriwether County, GA; Private, South Carolina Militia; .... HATCHER, John Edward b. November 02, 1831 Crawford County; Roberta, Ga. ... Cem (B.1835)" Lee Co Ga Lee Guards CSA Muster Roll of Co B 51st Reg. ...
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gavets/BiosPageH.html - Similar
<LI about="r5">Gordon County, GA Civil War Soldier Records F-H

GIBSON, John H. Co G, 21st GA Infantry, CSA, Private. Deserted 6-24-64. ... HATCHER, F. M., Co G, 18th GA Infantry, CSA, Private. AWOL 8-31-61. Born 1826. .... Co E, 40th GA Infantry, CSA, Private. POW 5-18-63 at Edward's Depot, MS. ...
www.censusdiggins.com/gordoncw3.html - Similar
<LI about="r6">2nd Maryland Infantry, CSA

Quickly two companies under Cpt. Murray and Cpt. J. Parran Crane were organized. ... to Steuart's Brigade, now part of Edward Johnson's Diviison, Ewell's 2nd Corps. .... On February 5, 1865 they fought at Hatcher's Run. Then, slowly at first, ... Kimmel, Ross M. “Maryland Private Henry Hollyday's Faded Confederate ...
www.2ndmdinfantryus.org/csinf2.html - Similar

---------------------
National Archives and Records Administration
Holds the records of the United States Federal government. On-line access to art works, census data, US legal manuscripts, the Federal Register and numerous ...

www.archives.gov/ - Similar
Resources for Genealogists and Family Historians
The National Archives offers insight into the lives of people, their families ... Because the records at the National Archives come from every branch of the ...

www.archives.gov/genealogy/ - Similar

[ More results from www.archives.gov ]

National Archives in DC/MD - should be able to pull military record, parole record, --the description ledger , would be the best find, as it was much like the soldier's dog tags, which gave weight, height, eye color, hair color, place of birth, D.O.B., notations of wounds, and or where, when and how a person died; etc.

I'll check back when able.

M. E. Wolf
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
Should help in locating the parole site:

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 1.--Reports of Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, U.S. Army, commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.
HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
Goldsborough, N. C., April 4, 1865.
GENERAL: I must now endeavor to group the events of the past three months connected with the armies under my command, in order that you may have as clear an understanding of the late campaign as the case admits of. The reports of the subordinate commanders will enable you to fill up the picture.
[excerpt]
During the night of May 2, at Hilton Head, having concluded my business in the Department of the South, I began my return to meet my troops, then marching toward Richmond from Raleigh. On the morning of the 3d we ran into Charleston Harbor, where I had the pleasure to meet Admiral Dahlgren, who had, in all my previous operations from Savannah northward, aided me with a courtesy and manliness that commanded my entire respect and deep affection; also, General Hatch, who, from our first interview at his Tullifinny camp, had caught the spirit of the move from Pocotaligo northward, and had largely contributed to our joint success in taking Charleston and the Carolina coast. Any one who is not satisfied with war should go and see Charleston, and he will pray louder and deeper than ever that the country may in the long future be spared any more war. Charleston and secession being synonymous terms, the city should be left as a sample, so that centuries may pass away before that false doctrine is again preached in our Union.
We left Charleston on the evening of the 3d of May, and hastened with all possible speed back to Morehead City, which we reached at night of the 4th. I immediately communicated by telegraph with General Schofield, at Raleigh, and learned from him the pleasing fact that the lieutenant-general commanding the Armies of the United States had reached the Chesapeake in time to countermand General Halleck's orders, and prevent his violating my truce, invading the area of my command, and driving Johnston's surrendering army into fragments. General Johnston had fulfilled his agreement to the very best of his ability; and the officers charged with issuing the paroles at Greensborough reported about 30,000 already made, and that the greater part of the North Carolina troops had gone home without waiting for their papers, but that all of them would doubtless come into some one of the military posts, the commanders of which are authorized to grant them. About 800 of the rebel cavalry had gone south, refusing to abide the terms of the surrender, and it was supposed they would make for Mexico. I would sincerely advise that they be encouraged to go and stay; they would be a nuisance to any civilized Government, whether loose or in prison.
With the exception of some plundering on the part of Lee's and Johnston's disbanded men, all else in North Carolina was "quiet." When to the number of men surrendered at Greensborough are added those at Tallahassee, Augusta, and Macon, with the scattered squads who will come in at other military posts, I have no doubt 50,000 armed men will be disarmed and restored to civil pursuits by the capitulation made near Durham Station, N. C., on the 26th of April, and that, too, without the loss of a single life to us.
[ excerpt]
General Schofield, at Raleigh, has a well-appointed and well-disciplined command, is in telegraphic communication with the controlling parts of his department, and remote ones in the direction of Georgia, as well as with Washington, and has military possession of all strategic points.
[excerpt]
In like manner General Gillmore is well situated in all respects except as to rapid communication with the seat of the General Government. I leave him also with every man he ever asked for, and in full and quiet possession of every strategic point in his department; and General Wilson has in the very heart of Georgia the strongest, best appointed, and best equipped cavalry corps that ever fell under my command; and he has now, by my recent action, opened to him a source and route of supply by way of Savannah River that simplifies his military problem, so that I think I may with a clear conscience leave them and turn my attention once more to my special command, the army with which I have been associated through some of the most eventful scenes of this or any war.
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O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS.
April 26, 1865. -- Surrender of the Confederate Army in North Carolina at Bennett's House, near Durham Station, N. C.

This may be where the parole search for 5th Georgia Infantry Co. A may be.

I'll wait for your response to all this.

Respectfully submitted,
M. E. Wolf
 
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