Dogs In The War

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
Candy, the mascot of Co. B, 4th Texas Infantry, as told by Sgt. Val C. Giles in his company roster:

candy-1-jpg.jpg

candy-2-jpg.jpg
 

Dave Hull

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 28, 2011
Location
Northern Virginia
Looks like an Ovcharka a bit. If they had one there, no one got away without some pain. We have three, sweethearts to those they love, holy terrors on everything. My son had two in Afghanistan where they are called Koochi Dogs. They went bananas anytime an Afghani was within 400 yards of their COP.
 

JohnnnyReb

Corporal
Joined
Apr 10, 2013
Location
Warm Springs Virginia
I was just looking at this page today and found it was already posted in here. I really enjoyed the article. I had always wondered about using dogs during the war. Could you imagine using dogs as a charging force? Imagine 2k dogs charging in front of Picketts men at Gettysburg.
I had read somewhere that Andersonville had huge guard dogs, some 200 pounds and almost 7 feet long. Reminds me of those huge dogs the Russians use in their prisons today. They are enormous. Caucasion Ovcharka.





533px-Caucasian_Ovcharka_0101.jpg
 

Custers Luck

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Location
Chesterfield VA.
Let me be the first to say that there were no known dog confederates. I won't believe it and refuse to look at any proof. Sure, there were probably some dogs in the ANV but they had been brought by their masters and weren't carried on the official rosters.
Once again Billo I"m on the floor laughing, GOTTA love billo he has a great sense of humor!!!!!!!!
 

Custers Luck

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Location
Chesterfield VA.
I was just looking at this page today and found it was already posted in here. I really enjoyed the article. I had always wondered about using dogs during the war. Could you imagine using dogs as a charging force? Imagine 2k dogs charging in front of Picketts men at Gettysburg.
I had read somewhere that Andersonville had huge guard dogs, some 200 pounds and almost 7 feet long. Reminds me of those huge dogs the Russians use in their prisons today. They are enormous. Caucasion Ovcharka.





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I dont think I have seen this breed before, any one know why the dogs from Europe are so BIG!!! what is the other big ones is it an Irish wolf hounds???? wow they are really big!!!
 

rhp6033

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Location
Everett, Washington
I've had a Chow ("Chelsie") and my daughter had a dog which was half Astralian Shepard and half Pyranese ("Cody"), but that Siberian dog makes them look small by comparison.

Dog stories (off topic of sort):

Our chow's father ("Duke") was an escape artist, no fence could hold him. He even learned to open windows and garage doors. He got into a fight with a pit bull once and had him penned in no time flat, using his upper body strength. But chow's can't swim - Chelsea fell into the river once and by the time I got down on the dock and reached for her, all I could get hold of was the hair on her ear. I've never seen a dog so happy as when I pulled her up out of the water.

My daughter picked up her dog at the pound. We don't know her background, but she was great with people but hated any other dog. We noticed something peculiar about her right off - she would stand in your way and turn her body sideways (she was about five feet long) so it took some effort to go around her. After a while we realized it was her "herding instinct" - she was forcing us to go where she wanted.
 

jkamler

Cadet
Joined
Dec 3, 2013
I have seen some books say that "Sallie" was actually a male dog that had been either erroneously or jokingly given a female name. Can anyone comment on this?
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
I have seen some books say that "Sallie" was actually a male dog that had been either erroneously or jokingly given a female name. Can anyone comment on this?
According to the memoir of Colonel Richard Coulter of the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, with whom Sallie served as mascot, she was indeed female, and had four litters of pups while accompanying the regiment. But your question is a good one in light of the fact that the stories of some famous Civil War dogs have not been as well documented as Sallie's. Perhaps most notable among these is the story of "Grace," the dog of the 2nd Maryland CSA, who was killed in the fighting at Culp's Hill. Grace's gender and actual name are unknown, and it is possible that "Grace" is a name given to the dog after the fact, based on the episode recounted by General Thomas Kane. In a letter, General Kane told how the dog licked someone's hand even after having been shot numerous times. General Kane had the dog buried with honors “as the only Christian minded being on either side.”
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
Maybe it was short for Salvador?

R
It was a nickname of sorts, actually short for Sallie Ann Jarrett, her full name. She was named for two people, the 11th Pennsylvania's original commanding officer, Colonel Phaon Jarrett, and a young lady of West Chester, Pennsylvania, where the regiment was first mustered into service at Camp Wayne. Patriotic local citizens often visited the camp, enjoying the regiments' dress parades and bringing gifts for the soldiers. Sallie the dog was one of these gifts, given to Sergeant William Terry of the 11th's Company I by a local gentleman. Here is a link to donna's thread about Sallie, which you may enjoy:
http://civilwartalk.com/threads/sal...e-11th-pennsylvania-volunteer-infantry.23931/
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
I have seen some books say that "Sallie" was actually a male dog that had been either erroneously or jokingly given a female name
I have seen some books say that "Sallie" was actually a male dog that had been either erroneously or jokingly given a female name. Can anyone comment on this?

Sallie was supposedly a black female terrier belonging to the 11th PA Infantry. She was shot and killed at Hatcher's Run, Feb.5, 1865. The story is two soldiers in tears put down their weapons during the battle and buried her. A likeness of a sleeping Sallie is on the 11th's monument at Gettysburg. There was also Major of the 10th Maine. Sergeant of the 3rd Louisiana. Stonewall of the Richmond Howitzers. When the Confederate 2nd KY surrendered at Fort Donelson so to did their dog, Frank, who spent 6 month with them imprisoned at Camp Morton.
 
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