Discrepency in Information

Joined
Dec 1, 2009
Messages
369
Location
Lake Villa, Illinois
#1
I was wondering if any of you can tell me why some reports of the movements and actions of the 126th Illinois include only minor skirmishes but some of them say that the 126th were involved in operations around Vicksburg? Can anyone find what really happened? BTW DW Mack was in CO. F. (BTW, In his letters he mentions nothing about battles he was involved in- only that his reg heard a trumpet call one morning to form a line of battle but it ended up being a false alarm)


Thanks for your help.

Dan
 

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
14,882
Location
South of the North 40
#2
The area of Ops for Vicksburg was quite extensive. And not necessarily in th trenches. 126th may well have been on the eastern side of the operational area keeping the CS from making relief a real option.
 

ole

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
34,437
Location
Near Kankakee
#3
Corporal Steele is spot on (I think). Whole brigades in the Vicksburg operating theater saw no or little action. It might have been guarding wagon trains or sitting west of Jackson facing east. It would help some if you start with the brigade, move up through the division and identify the corps.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2009
Messages
369
Location
Lake Villa, Illinois
#5
Ok, Apparently he was with The Army of The Tennesee "Provisional Division " Under Brig General Nathan Kimball. He was under Col. Jonathan Richmond's Brigade. The 126th was com. by Maj. William Wilshire. Thats great info, but doesn't tell me the role he played or how to find it.
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,459
Location
Virginia
#6
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/2 [S# 37]
MAY 19-JULY 4, 1863.--The Siege of Vicksburg, Miss.
No. 1.--Organization of the Union forces operating against Vicksburg, Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U.S. Army, commanding, May 18, July 4. 1863,.

PROVISIONAL DIVISION.(*)
Brig. Gen. NATHAN KIMBALL.
Engelmann's Brigade.
Col. ADOLPH ENGELMANN.
43d Illinois, Lieut. Col. Adolph Dengler.
61st Illinois, Maj. Simon P. Ohr.
106th Illinois, Maj. John M. Hurt.
12th Michigan, Col. William H. Graves.

Richmond's Brigade.
Col. JONATHAN RICHMOND.
18th Illinois, Col. Daniel H. Brush
54th Illinois, Col. Greenville M. Mitchell.
126th Illinois, Maj. William W. Wilshire.
22d Ohio, Col. Oliver Wood.

Montgomery's Brigade.
Col. MILTON MONTGOMERY.
40th Iowa, Col. John A. Garrett.
3d Minnesota, Col. Chauncey W. Griggs.
25th Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. Samuel J. Nasmith.
27th Wisconsin, Col. Conrad Krez.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#10
DISTRICT OF JACKSON.(*)
Brig. Gen. NATHAN KIMBALL.
First Brigade.
Brig. Gen. MASON BRAYMAN.
43d Illinois, Col. Adolph Engelmann.
61st Illinois, Maj. Simon P. Ohr.
106th Illinois, Col. Robert B. Latham.
12th Michigan,(+) Col. William H. Graves.
Illinois Light Artillery, Independent Battery, Capt. Thomas F. Vaughn.
Second Brigade.
Col. MICHAEL K. LAWLER.
18th Illinois,(++) Lieut. Col. Daniel H. Brush.
54th Illinois, Col. Greenville M. Mitchell.
126th Illinois, (++) Lieut. Col. Ezra M. Beardsley.
22d Ohio, Col. Oliver Wood.

Third Brigade.
Col. JAMES M. TRUE.
62d Illinois, Lieut. Col. Daniel B. Robinson.
50th Indians, Lieut. Col. Samuel T. Wells.
27th Iowa, Col. James I. Gilbert.
1st West Tennessee, Lieut. Col. William T. Wilson.

Cavalry Brigade.
Col. JOHN K. MIZNER.
11th Illinois(§) (eight companies), Lieut. Col. Bazil D. Meek.
3d Michigan, Lieut. Col. Gilbert Meyers.
6th Tennessee, Col. Fielding Hurst.

Artillery.
Capt. MEREDITH H. KIDD.
14th Indiana Battery, Lieut. Francis W. Morse.
14th Ohio Battery, Capt. Jerome B. Burrows.
7th Wisconsin Battery, Lieut. Galen E. Green.
==============================================
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVII/2 [S# 25]
APPENDIX--Embracing documents received too late for insertion in proper sequence.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.
GENERAL ORDERS No. 2.
HDQRS. PROVISIONAL BRIGADE,
Humboldt, Tenn., December 22, 1862--10 p.m.
The undersigned having been relieved by Brig. Gen. Isham N. Haynie from the command of the United States troops now at this place, desires to officially express his thanks to the officers and men of Companies B, C, G, H, and I, of the One hundred and twenty-sixth Illinois Infantry, Lieut. Col. E. M. Beardsley commanding; Companies H, I, and K, of the One hundred and sixth Illinois Infantry, Capt. P. W. Harts commanding; "about 600 men" of the Seventh Tennessee Infantry, Col. John A. Rogers commanding, and Companies A and B (dismounted), of the Second Tennessee Cavalry, Captain Thompson commanding, for the alacrity, cheerfulness, and fearlessness with which all his orders, with one exception, were obeyed, in the trying situation in which we were placed.

To Col. A. G. Malloy, Seventeenth Wisconsin Infantry; Reverend Father [Napolean] Mignault, of the same regiment, and Mr. Miles Sells, of Saint Louis, Mo. (passengers), he tenders his appreciation of their proffered services.
To Capt. George A. Williams, First U.S. Infantry, adjutant; First Lieut. Henry C. Whittemore, Second Illinois Artillery, aide-de-camp, and Dr. S. L. Hamlen, of Cincinnati, Ohio, subsistence officer (passengers), he acknowledges with gratification their faithful and prompt discharge of onerous duties.

The facts of having saved two large railroad trains, and all and everything on board, from capture and probable destruction by the enemy, and having then driven them out and recaptured the town of Humboldt, Tenn., under very adverse circumstances, is glory enough for one day, and conclusively proves the absolute necessity, for military success, that colonels of regiments should be men selected and appointed for their military knowledge, and not for political and social reasons.
GEORGE P. IHRIE,
Colonel and Additional Aide-de-Camp on General Grant's Staff.
-----

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#2
Third Brigade.
Col. JONATHAN RICHMOND.
119th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Samuel E. Taylor.
196th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Ezra M. Beardsley. Note the miss-type should be 126th
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,459
Location
Virginia
#8
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/1 [S# 36]
Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee, Including Those In Arkansas And Louisiana. Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg.--January 20-August 10, 1863.
No. 2.--Reports of Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding Army of the Tennessee, including correspondence with the authorities at Washington, January 20-July 10.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,
Vicksburg, Miss., July 6, 1863.

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit the following report of the Operations of the Army of the Tennessee, and co-operating forces, from the date of my assuming the immediate command of the expedition against Vicksburg, Miss., to the reduction of that place:
[excerpt]
At daylight on the I7th, the pursuit was renewed, with McClernand's corps in-the advance. The enemy was found strongly posted on both sides of the Black River. At this point on Black River the bluffs extend to the water's edge on the west bank. On the east side is an open, cultivated bottom of nearly 1 mile in width, surrounded by a bayou of stagnant water, from 2 to 3 feet in depth and from 10 to 20 feet in width, from the river above the railroad to the river below. Following the inside line of this bayou, the enemy had constructed rifle-pits, with the bayou to serve as a ditch on the outside and immediately in front of them. Carr's division occupied the right in investing this place, and Lawler's brigade the fight of his division. After a few hours' skirmishing, Lawler discovered that by moving a portion of his brigade under cover of the river bank he could get a position from which that place could be successfully assaulted, and ordered a charge accordingly. Notwithstanding the 1evel ground over which a portion of his troops had to pass without cover, and the great obstacle of the ditch in front of the enemy's works, the charge was gallantly and successfully made, and in a few minutes the entire garrison, with seventeen pieces of artillery, were the trophies of this brilliant and daring movement. The enemy on the west bank of the river immediately set fire to the railroad bridge and retreated, thus cutting off all chance of escape for any portion of his forces remaining on the east bank.
[end of excerpt]
------------------------
Using Lawler's Brigade which 126th Illinois was a part of--is as close to any report of what they may have done there
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#17
COLUMBUS, KY., June 15, 1863.
Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in- Chief:
The abandonment of the District of Jackson by our forces, and the reduction of my command by six regiments of infantry and seven companies of cavalry, ordered to Memphis and Vicksburg, places my district in a critical position, and leaves the whole country between the Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers--from Paducah to Corinth, over 150 miles in length, comprising about 15,000 square miles, where secessionism prevails and guerrillas are constantly organizing--guarded by only a part of my former force, now not over 4,000 men.
[excerpt]

My troops have been always fully occupied, and have cleaned my district of guerrillas. I succeeded in capturing several prominent guerrilla leaders, with many of their officers and men, a week ago. We broke up two powerful organizations--that of Colonel Dawson, on the Tennessee, and that of Colonel Harrison, who took Richardson's place on the Obion. Any re-enforcements granted will be well placed, and will assist me in operating energetically; and I feel confident of success at this most critical period in our western command.

I have just received a telegram from Union City that my locomotive, with working party repairing telegraph line, was fired upon by the rebels near Trenton, but escaped. The post commander at Hickman anticipates an attack to-night. I feel compelled to detain troops proceeding down the river, and request your sanction.
ASBOTH.
-----
Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 3 (Regimental Histories)
ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS.
126th REGIMENT INFANTRY.
Organized at Alton, I11., and mustered in September 4. 1862. Moved to Columbus. Ky., thence to Bolivar and LaGrange. Tenn., November 20-28, 1862. Attached to District of Jackson, 13th Army Corps (Old), Department of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, District of Jackson, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 16th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Kimball's Provisional Division, 16th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Kimball's Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Arkansas Expedition, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of the Arkansas, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, to February, 1865. Unattached, 7th Army Corps, mouth of White River, Ark., to July, 1865.

ERVICE.--Duty at LaGrange, Tenn., till January, 1863. (6 Companies moved to Jackson, Tenn., December 19, 1862; thence moved to Humboldt, Tenn. R.R. crossing at Fork Deer River December 20. Action at Humboldt December 21.) 4 Companies on duty at Jackson, Tenn., and 6 Companies at Humboldt, Tenn., January to March 25; then at Jackson till May 25, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 25-28. Siege of Vicksburg May 28-July 4. Moved to Helena. Ark., July 24. Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., August 1-September 10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Moved to Duvall's Bluff October 24, and duty there till August 19, 1864. Action at Clinton June 25-26. Moved to Pine Bluff, Ark., August 19, and duty there till February 12, 1865. Scouts from Pine Bluff toward Camden and Monticello January 26-31. At mouth of White River, Ark., till June 12, and at Pine Bluff till July 12. Mustered out July 12, 1865.
Regiment lost during service 6 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 192 Enlisted men by disease. Total 202.
===================================================
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVII/1 [S# 24]
OCTOBER 31, 1862-JANUARY 10, 1863.--Operations on the Mississippi Central Railroad from Bolivar, Tenn., to Coffeeville, Miss.(*)
No. 19 - Col. Jonathan Richmond, One hundred and twenty-sixth Illinois Infantry, of skirmish at Davis' Mill, December 21.
--------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVII/2 [S# 25]
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN WEST TENNESSEE AND NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI FROM JUNE 10, 1862, TO JANUARY 20, 1863.(*)
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#15
HOLLY SPRINGS, MISS., November 30, 1862.
Colonel NORTON,
Commanding Post, La Grange, Tenn.:
It is reported that a party of the enemy with flag of truce came into La Grange, exchanged prisoners, and returned without.
This should not have been permitted. You have no authority to exchange prisoners, and should have had pickets out. The enemy's real object was to learn your strength and position. You may look out for an attempt on their part to destroy our supplies at Grand Junction and La Grange. The One hundred and twenty-sixth Illinois Infantry has been ordered to report to you, which, with the infantry and cavalry designated as a garrison for those places, will be, with proper diligence on your part, sufficient to hold them and protect our stores.
Picket the several roads leading to Grand Junction and La Grange at once and keep a sharp lookout to the east and west of you.
By order of Maj. Gen. U.S. Grant:
JNO. A. RAWLINS,
Assistant Adjutant-General
-----
Huge gap - next hit is in November, 1863

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXII/1 [S# 32]
NOVEMBER 19, 1863.--Skirmish at Dr. Green's farm, near Lawrenceville, Ark.
Report of Col. Jonathan Richmond, One hundred and twenty-sixth Illinois Infantry.
DEVALL,'S BLUFF, ARK., November 20, 1863.
SIR: Major [W. J.] Teed, in command of Eighth Missouri Cavalry detachment, has just returned from a scout to Lawrenceville. He reports that he attacked Major Cocke's forces, 8 miles west of Lawrenceville, on the farm of Dr. Green, on yesterday morning, about 7 o'clock, killing 4 men, who were left on the field, and took 1 prisoner. Citizens report Major Cocke killed; also Lieutenant McBride, but the major cannot vouch for its being correct. He also brought in Lieutenant Sutton, of Captain Edmonson's company. One horse killed was the only loss we sustained. Captured and destroyed cooking utensils, provender, &c.
J. RICHMOND,
Colonel, Commanding Post.
Lieut. GEORGE O SOKALSKI,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.
 

johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
14,882
Location
South of the North 40
#10
I know they were on the NE portion of the Vicksburg area of ops other than that I'm not certain.

Look to Dyer's Compendium (google sould bring it up)for an exact idea of Brigade, Division, Corps and Army for the timeframe.

There are several good works on Vicksburg but any titles escape me at the moment, hopefully someone will be able to add the needed titles.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2009
Messages
369
Location
Lake Villa, Illinois
#11
I know they were on the NE portion of the Vicksburg area of ops other than that I'm not certain.

Look to Dyer's Compendium (google sould bring it up)for an exact idea of Brigade, Division, Corps and Army for the timeframe.

There are several good works on Vicksburg but any titles escape me at the moment, hopefully someone will be able to add the needed titles.


"My health is only tolerable I had
the chills at Haines Bluff or somthi
-ng like them & have not got my
strength yet I have not got much..." DW Mack

*Haines Bluff is 20 miles north of Vicksburg. Was there any kind of skirmish?????????
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
9,933
Location
South Carolina
#12
"My health is only tolerable I had
the chills at Haines Bluff or somthi
-ng like them & have not got my
strength yet I have not got much..." DW Mack

*Haines Bluff is 20 miles north of Vicksburg. Was there any kind of skirmish?????????
Here's a little I found:
http://books.google.com/books?id=fa...&resnum=1&ved=0CBYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
page 39

A portion of the division bore a part in skirmish at Mechanicsburg Mississippi June 4 1863 without reported casualties Uniting with the remainder of the divison at Haynes Bluff June 7 the whole force held that position until June 15 when it moved to Snyder's Bluff strongly fortified that point and remained there to the end of the siege

Engelmann's Brigade
Col Adolph Engelmann 43rd Illinois Lieut Col Adolph Dengler 61st Illinois Maj Simon P Ohr 106th Illinois Maj John M Hurt 12th Michigan Col William H Graves

Richmond's Brigade
Col Jonathan Richmond 18th Illinois Col Daniel H Brush 54th Illinois Col Greenville M Mitchell 126th Illinois Maj William W Wilshire 22nd Ohio Col Oliver Wood Montgomery's Brigade Col Milton Montgomery 40th Iowa Col John A Garrett 3rd Minnesota Col Chauncey W Griggs 25th Wisconsin Lieut Col Samuel J Nasmith 27th Wisconsin Col Conrad Krez

dvrmte
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
9,933
Location
South Carolina
#13
Evidently the 126th didn't see much action based on the casualties they sustained.

http://www.mosocco.com/illinois.html
[FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]126th Illinois Regiment Volunteers:[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif] Organized at Alton, I11., and mustered in September 4. 1862. Moved to Columbus. Ky., then to Bolivar and LaGrange. Tenn., November 20-28, 1862. Attached to District of Jackson, 13th Army Corps (Old), Department of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, District of Jackson, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 16th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Kimball's Provisional Division, 16th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Kimball's Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Arkansas Expedition, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of the Arkansas, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, to February, 1865. Unattached, 7th Army Corps, mouth of White River, Ark., to July, 1865. [/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]SERVICE:--Duty at LaGrange, Tenn., until January, 1863. (6 Companies moved to Jackson, Tenn., December 19, 1862; then moved to Humboldt, Tenn. R.R. crossing at Fork Deer River December 20. Action at Humboldt December 21.) 4 Companies on duty at Jackson, Tenn., and 6 Companies at Humboldt, Tenn., January to March 25; then at Jackson until May 25, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 25-28. Siege of Vicksburg May 28-July 4. Moved to Helena. Ark., July 24. Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., August 1-September 10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Moved to Duvall's Bluff October 24, and duty there until August 19, 1864. Action at Clinton June 25-26. Moved to Pine Bluff, Ark., August 19, and duty there until February 12, 1865. Scouts from Pine Bluff toward Camden and Monticello January 26-31. At mouth of White River, Ark., until June 12, and at Pine Bluff until July 12. Mustered out July 12, 1865. [/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]Regiment lost during service 6 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 192 Enlisted men by disease. Total 202. [/FONT]
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2009
Messages
369
Location
Lake Villa, Illinois
#14
Here's a little I found:
http://books.google.com/books?id=fa...&resnum=1&ved=0CBYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
page 39

A portion of the division bore a part in skirmish at Mechanicsburg Mississippi June 4 1863 without reported casualties Uniting with the remainder of the divison at Haynes Bluff June 7 the whole force held that position until June 15 when it moved to Snyder's Bluff strongly fortified that point and remained there to the end of the siege

Engelmann's Brigade
Col Adolph Engelmann 43rd Illinois Lieut Col Adolph Dengler 61st Illinois Maj Simon P Ohr 106th Illinois Maj John M Hurt 12th Michigan Col William H Graves

Richmond's Brigade
Col Jonathan Richmond 18th Illinois Col Daniel H Brush 54th Illinois Col Greenville M Mitchell 126th Illinois Maj William W Wilshire 22nd Ohio Col Oliver Wood Montgomery's Brigade Col Milton Montgomery 40th Iowa Col John A Garrett 3rd Minnesota Col Chauncey W Griggs 25th Wisconsin Lieut Col Samuel J Nasmith 27th Wisconsin Col Conrad Krez

dvrmte


Great find! Know I know there was a little something around the V-burg are going on that Grandpa was involved in.
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
9,933
Location
South Carolina
#15
Great find! Know I know there was a little something around the V-burg are going on that Grandpa was involved in.
I'm sure you know about the 26th North Carolina at Gettysburg and the high rate of casualties they sustained. Up to that point they were a relatively green regiment though well drilled and disciplined.

Be thankful that the 126th Illinois didn't have to prove their mettle in such a way, as you may not be here with us on this forum.

Your ancestor did serve, be proud of that.

dvrmte
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,459
Location
Virginia
#16
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIII/2 [S# 35]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Middle And East Tennessee, North Alabama, And Southwest Virginia, From January 21 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#15
MEMPHIS, May 26, 1863---7.30 p.m.
General ROSECRANS:
The following is the last received from Grant, from near Vicksburg, May 22:
Major-General HALLECK:
Vicksburg is now completely invested. I have possession of Haines' Bluff and the Yazoo; consequently have supplies. To-day an attempt was made to carry the city by assault, but was not entirely successful. We hold possession, however, of some of the enemy's forts and have skirmishers close under them all.
Our loss was not severe.
The nature of the ground about Vicksburg is such that it can only be taken by siege. It is entirely safe to us in time; I would say within one week, if the enemy do not send a larger army upon my rear. With the railroad destroyed to beyond Pearl River, I don't see the hope the enemy can entertain of such relief.
I learn that Davis has promised, if the garrison can hold out fifteen days, he will send 100,000 men, if he has to evacuate Tennessee to do it.
S. A. HURLBUT,
Major-General.
-----
Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 2 (Campaigns etc.)
Battle Index--Mississippi
1863.
Jan. 9-10 Evacuation of Holly Springs
Jan. 11-13 Expedition to Harbert's Plantation
Feb. 8 Skirmish, Horn Lake Creek
March 15-16 Skirmishes Hernando
April 18 Skirmish, Hernando
Apr. 29-May 1 Demonstration on Haines' Bluff
April 30 Skirmish, Haines' Bluff
May 1 Action, Haines' Bluff

May 8-4 Skirmishes, Hankinson's Ferry
May 13 Skirmish, Hall's Ferry
May 18 Capture, Haines' Bluff
May 23 Skirmish, Haines' Bluff

May 23-24 Expedition to Hernando
May 26 Expedition to Hernando
May 26-June 4 Expedition from Haines' Bluff
1863.
1864.
Feb. 3 Action, Haines' Bluff

April 19-23 Expedition from Haines' Bluff

 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,459
Location
Virginia
#17
Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 2 (Campaigns etc.)
Battles, Campaigns, Etc., in Mississippi
April 30 Skirmish, Haines' Bluff MISSOURI--8th Infantry.

May 1 Action, Haines' Bluff MISSOURI--6th Infantry. OHIO--58th Infantry.

May 18 Capture of Haines' Bluff IOWA--4th Cavalry (Detachment).

May 23 Skirmish, Haines' Bluff ILLINOIS--2d Cavalry (Detachment).

May 26-June 4 Exp. from Haines' Bluff to Mechanicsburg. ILLINOIS--Batteries "B" and "E" 1st Light Arty.; 11th 47th, 72d, 95th and 114th Infantry. INDIANA--93d Infantry. IOWA--2d Battery Light Arty.; 8th, 11th, 12th 13th, 15th, 16th and 35th Infantry. KANSAS--1st Infantry. MINNESOTA--4th and 5th Infantry. MISSOURI--Battery "C" 1st Light Arty.; 11th Infantry OHIO--72d and 95th Infantry. WISCONSIN--8th, 14th 16th and 17th Infantry.

Feb, 3 Action, Haines' Bluff MISSISSIPPI--3d Colored Infantry.

April 19-23 Exp. from Haines' Bluff up Yazoo River.. KANSAS--1st Mounted Infantry (Detachment). MISSOURI--10th Cavalry (Detachment). UNITED STATES --3d Colored Cavalry (Detachment); Battery "B," 2d Colored Light Arty.; 47th and 50th Colored Infantry; Gunboats "Petrel" and "Prairie Bird."

=======================
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#22
VICKSBURG, MISS., July 20, 1863.
General WASHBURN, Snyder's Bluff:
General Kimball's division in readiness to be moved up the river as soon as possible. Boats will be ordered as soon as coal arrives to furnish fuel. Full instructions will be given before the troops leave.
U. S. GRANT.
-----
 

johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
14,882
Location
South of the North 40
#18
That's possible but I don't know one way or the other. One of the misleading things is how "died by disease" was tabulated. As often as not it could be from complications from wounds. But from looking at the other data I'm going to wager you are correct. They were used quite a bit for garrison duties as well as part of the campaign that took Arkansas away from the CS.

Evidently the 126th didn't see much action based on the casualties they sustained.

http://www.mosocco.com/illinois.html
[FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]126th Illinois Regiment Volunteers:[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif] Organized at Alton, I11., and mustered in September 4. 1862. Moved to Columbus. Ky., then to Bolivar and LaGrange. Tenn., November 20-28, 1862. Attached to District of Jackson, 13th Army Corps (Old), Department of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, District of Jackson, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 16th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Kimball's Provisional Division, 16th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Kimball's Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Arkansas Expedition, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of the Arkansas, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, to February, 1865. Unattached, 7th Army Corps, mouth of White River, Ark., to July, 1865. [/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]SERVICE:--Duty at LaGrange, Tenn., until January, 1863. (6 Companies moved to Jackson, Tenn., December 19, 1862; then moved to Humboldt, Tenn. R.R. crossing at Fork Deer River December 20. Action at Humboldt December 21.) 4 Companies on duty at Jackson, Tenn., and 6 Companies at Humboldt, Tenn., January to March 25; then at Jackson until May 25, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., May 25-28. Siege of Vicksburg May 28-July 4. Moved to Helena. Ark., July 24. Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., August 1-September 10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Moved to Duvall's Bluff October 24, and duty there until August 19, 1864. Action at Clinton June 25-26. Moved to Pine Bluff, Ark., August 19, and duty there until February 12, 1865. Scouts from Pine Bluff toward Camden and Monticello January 26-31. At mouth of White River, Ark., until June 12, and at Pine Bluff until July 12. Mustered out July 12, 1865. [/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, Times, serif]Regiment lost during service 6 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 192 Enlisted men by disease. Total 202. [/FONT]
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,459
Location
Virginia
#19
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/1 [S# 36]
Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee, Including Those In Arkansas And Louisiana. Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg.--January 20-August 10, 1863.
No. 3.--Report of Mr. Charles A. Dana, special commissioner of the United States War Department.
BEHIND VICKSBURG, MISS., June 6, 1863--7 p.m.,
VIA MEMPHIS, June 12--5 p.m.
Kimball reports from Mechanicsburg that on entering that place from Satartia day before yesterday, he found the enemy drawn up in line of battle. Attacked immediately, and drove him out. His cavalry were pursuing as he wrote. No other particulars. General Grant has just started for the place, deeming it necessary to examine the situation there himself. I go with him. The siege goes on steadily. Deserters all report short rations and divided councils within, a great part of the soldiers and all the citizens desiring to surrender.
They fired a good deal yesterday, having evidently received a new supply of caps.
C. A. DANA.
Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War.

HAYNES' BLUFF, June 7, 1863,
VIA MEMPHIS, June 10.
On approaching to within 2 miles of Satartia last evening, we found that N. Kimball had retreated to Oak Ridge Post-Office, sending the commissary stores and baggage by the river to this place. The gunboats were also coming down, and General Grant returned here with them.

The reason of Kimball's movement appears to be an extraordinary fall in the Yazoo, which caused him to fear that his supplies might become insecure at Satartia. His affair on the 4th was but a small skirmish, in which he took some 40 prisoners, with no loss to himself, as I am informed from Kimball. We have no official report. A rebel deserter reports that General W. H. T. Walker is at Yazoo City with eight brigades, and that Joe Johnston is advancing from Canton to the Big Black with a large force.
C. A. DANA.
Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War.

BEHIND VICKSBURG, MISS., June 8, 1863---10 a.m.,
VIA MEMPHIS, June 10...5 p.m.
I have just returned from the vicinity of Mechanicsburg, whither I went with a party of cavalry from Haynes' Bluff yesterday. There were no signs of any considerable force of the enemy, though Kimball had retreated from there the day before in a semi-panic. No doubt Johnston has moved some of his troops this side of the Big Black, but his main force yet stays at Canton. The idea of operating in that direction, both for devastation and for more direct military objects, General Grant has by no means abandoned. His intention has been to put C. C. Washburn in command there, but I now think he will send Sherman with a force of from 15,000 to 20,000 troops, including 2,500 cavalry. The country is like the rest of this peninsula--broken, wooded, unpopulous, with few streams. It still has many cattle, but the corn is pretty thoroughly cleared out. Johnston cannot move through it without bringing all his supplies with him.

Advices from Port Hudson to the 4th instant were brought yesterday by Col. J. Riggin, of General Grant's staff. The siege has not reached a decisive point. General Banks thinks if he had 10,000 troops more he could reduce the place in a few days, but we have not facts enough to understand the grounds of this opinion. So far as it is possible to judge at this distance, a regular siege is as indispensable there as it is here. The reason General Banks gives for not cooperating with General Grant is that he could not spare more troops from his own army and still hold New Orleans safe against any possible attack; then he would, by giving up the siege, liberate the enemy to join Johnston.

Milliken's Bend and Young's Point were both attacked day before yesterday by a body of rebels reported at about 1,500. At Milliken's Bend the negro troops at first gave way, but hearing that those of their number who were captured were killed, they rallied with great fury and routed the enemy. The white troops at Young's Point also repulsed him decisively.
C. A. DANA.
Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War.
-----------
REAR OF VICKSBURG, June 10, 1863--7 a.m.,
VIA MEMPHIS, June 16---10.30 a.m.
(Received June 23--1.30 a.m.)
General Grant has finally sent Washburn to Haynes' Bluff, and he will direct Operations there for the present. Joe Johnston, with his main force, still remains at Canton, and Breckinridge at Jackson. The fortifications at Haynes' Bluff are now completely laid out. No great work will be required to render it easy to defend the place effectually. Our intrenchments there are calculated for 30,000 to 50,000 troops. The siege here has not yet reached fortifications of the enemy. Sherman's approach, though conducted through the most difficult ground, is nearest of all. His sap was within 50 feet of the rebels' front at 9 p.m. yesterday. McPherson is at about 80 yards or more. Both Sherman and McPherson have abandoned the idea of mining, and intend to crown the enemy's parapet with their artillery. It is now certain that the enemy have constructed a new interior line of defense within the main works, which Sherman is attacking. A violent fire of musketry was heard within Vicksburg yesterday afternoon. No doubt it was mutiny, as we know that disaffection has long existed among their troops, and that on the day of our attack (May 22) both Tennessee and Georgia regiments refused to fight.

A portion of W. S. Smith's division has arrived at Haynes' Bluff. I have from Dennis the particulars of the fight of the 7th instant at Milliken's Bend. There was no fighting at Young's Point, Captain Townsend, commander of convalescents, having drawn up his men so cunningly that the rebels, who were within sight in line of battle, thought themselves greatly outnumbered and withdrew. At the Bend, the battle began soon after daybreak and lasted about three hours. The rebel force was a division of Texans, about 2,000 strong, who marched from Pine Bluff April 30, and arrived at Alexandria after General Banks had left there, and were then ordered this way. They were commanded by General J. G. Walker, with Generals H. E. McCulloch, J. M. Hawes, and Randal under him. They had no artillery. Our forces, who also had no artillery, consisted of Ninth [Eleventh] Louisiana (colored), Col. E. W. Chamberlain, and Twenty-third Iowa, Col. S. L. Glasgow, in all about 1,000 men. General Dennis describes the battle as the hardest he has ever seen. It was fought mainly hand to hand. After it was over, many men were found dead with bayonet stabs, and others with their skulls broken open by butts of muskets.

The Ninth Louisiana lost 62 killed and 130 wounded; the Eleventh, 30 killed and 120 wounded; the Twenty-third Iowa, 26 killed and 60 wounded; the Ninth has also a great number missing. Of the rebels, we buried 130. General McCulloch died on the field from the effects of a wound.

"It is impossible," says General Dennis, "for men to show greater gallantry than the negro troops in this fight." He does not know whether it is true that the rebels murdered their negro prisoners.

Col. H. Lieb, who was wounded, behaved admirably; Colonel Chamberlain badly.
General Grant has ordered Mower, with his brigade, to Milliken's Bend, and the enemy there will be cleared out beyond Tensas and in the neighborhood of Monroe.
C. A. DANA.
Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/2 [S# 37]
MAY 26-JUNE 4, 1863.--Expedition from Haynes' Bluff to Mechanicsburg, Miss., and skirmishes.
No. 2.--Reports of Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding Division.
HEADQUARTERS KIMBALL'S PROVISIONAL DIVISION,
Satartia, Miss., June 4, 1863--4 p.m.
SIR: I have the honor to report that I reached here at 11 a.m. to-day, and found General Mower just moving out with his brigade. I immediately debarked the troops with me and moved out, meeting the enemy in force on the hills back of the town. They fell back, skirmishing sharply, until at Mechanicsburg I found them drawn up in line of battle. I attacked them immediately with one brigade, and drove them from their position. The cavalry, coming up just at this time, joined in the pursuit, which at this writing is continued.
General Mower behaved with gallantry.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
NATHAN KIMBALL,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Lieut. Col. JOHN A. RAWLINS,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
P. S.--Send me more artillery. Johnston is massing considerable force at Canton. Please send my remaining infantry forward. We hold Mechanicsburg. I will report as soon as possible.

HEADQUARTERS KIMBALL'S PROVISIONAL DIVISION,
Satartia, Miss., June 5, 1863.
GENERAL: Yesterday two guns were placed in position by the enemy in front of my left, and dropped a few shot among the transports, but were soon silenced by the gunboats. They had, in addition, some 500 cavalry.

Three regiments are now here, which, until the country is more thoroughly examined, I shall keep here.

I shall be with you before noon.
Respectfully, yours,
NATHAN KIMBALL,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.
General MOWER.
-----

HEADQUARTERS KIMBALL'S PROVISIONAL DIVISION,
Satartia, Miss., June 5, 1863.
COLONEL: I find the enemy in force at Yazoo City. About 6 miles above here are 8.000, at Liverpool. The whole force on this (the Big Black) river is 20,000 infantry and cavalry and twenty-five guns. The force between the Yazoo and Black Rivers is under [W. H. T.] Walker. Johnston's headquarters are still at Canton, where he is massing troops; rumor says 60,000.

My cavalry penetrated to the Big Black River yesterday, and burned the ferries east of this place, but I find it impossible to go farther north on the Big Black as the enemy hold the country in force.

General Mower is occupying Mechanicsburg, and I am doing everything possible to obstruct an advance should one be made by the enemy. Should it be desired to hold this place in such a case, more force will be required and more artillery. Should I not be able to beat or repulse them, I shall hold to the very last.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
NATHAN KIMBALL,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Lieut. Col. JOHN A. RAWLINS,
Assistant Adjutant-Genera1.
---------------
HEADQUARTERS YAZOO EXPEDITION,
Satartia, June 5, 1863.
GENERAL: Since closing dispatches this morning I have a prisoner who left Walker's command at Yazoo City yesterday. He says Walker has 15,000 men; two brigades are from Bragg. Breckinridge is at Jackson. Johnston has 40,000 at Canton. From all I can gather, Walker's command is all between Yazoo and Big Black. I leave to-day for Haynes' Bluff.
Very respectfully,
NATHAN KIMBALL,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

-----
SATARTIA, MISS., June 6, 1863.
COLONEL: There is in front of me a large force, of which I cannot ascertain the exact amount, but which is not less than 15,000; and in view of the fact that the river is falling rapidly, and gunboats will soon be unable to recross the bar below, I shall to-day move toward Haynes' Bluff, starting as soon as I can get ready.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
NATHAN KIMBALL,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Lieut. Col. JOHN A. RAWLINS,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Tennessee.
-----------------------------
continued
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,459
Location
Virginia
#20
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/2 [S# 37]
MAY 26-JUNE 4, 1863.--Expedition from Haynes' Bluff to Mechanicsburg, Miss., and skirmishes.
No. 5.--Report of Brig. Gen. William H. Jackson, C. S. Army, commanding Cavalry Division.
PRITCHARD'S CROSS-ROADS,
June 7, 1863--10 p.m.
MAJOR: I sent a brigade very early this morning to ascertain all about the enemy's movements. The colonel commanding reports that their force consisted of two divisions (Generals Mower and Kimball), two light batteries, six guns each, and two pieces with the cavalry force (two regiments), estimated from 8,000 to 10,000; landed at Satartia 7 a.m. the 4th. Left yesterday morning at 12 m., and all marched to Snyder's Bluff. Kimball's quartermaster said they were ordered to fortify and defend that place against General Johnston's army, supposed by them to be advancing from this direction. Enemy left in some confusion. Colonel [L. S.] Ross destroyed twenty-five tents, and obtained a lot of pilot bread and hams, which they left at Satartia. Enemy destroyed property of every description; burned sixteen houses in Mechanicsburg and several on the road; also gin-houses; destroyed all bridges behind them. I am much in need of an accurate and full map of this country.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
W. H. JACKSON,
Brigadier-General.
Maj. A. P. MASON,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
P. S.--The brigade went several miles below Wesley Chapel, and sent scouts to within 8 miles of Snyder's Bluff.
----------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#17
EADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,
In the Field, near Vicksburg, June 11, 1863.
Maj. Gen. J. B. MCPHERSON,
Commanding Seventeenth Army Corps:
GENERAL: The enemy is reported by Major-General Washburn as having a force of ten regiments of cavalry, under [W. H.] Jackson, encamped 2 miles beyond Mechanicsburg, and a three of infantry, under [W. H. T.] Walker, at Yazoo City. General W. S. Smith's division, of General Hurlbut's corps, is now on the way here, under orders to go to Haynes' Bluff, which, with General Kimball's division, now there, makes a force of between 12,000 and 14,000 as the garrison; but, in the event of a movement of the enemy in this direction, it may become necessary to strengthen the force there. General Sherman has been directed to hold two brigades in readiness to move to the re-enforcement of Haynes' Bluff, on receipt of orders. Mower's brigade, of Sherman's corps, has been sent to Young's Point, to strengthen that place. You will hold three brigades of your corps in readiness to move to the re-enforcement of Haynes' Bluff, on receipt of orders. Major-General Herron is now here, with a division from General Schofield's army, and has orders to proceed to Warrenton and take up a position to the left of General Lauman. Eight thousand men, from General Burnside's army, are reported to be en route for this place, which will also be ordered to a position on the left, if nothing occurs between this and the time of their arrival to change the present phase of affairs; but, should any further re-enforcements for Haynes' Bluff be required, they will be taken from the left of General McClernand.
By order of Maj. Gen. U.S. Grant:
JNO. A. RAWLINS,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#18
GENERAL ORDERS, No. 49.
HDQRS. FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
Camp at Bear Creek, June 29, 1863.
The following modifications of existing orders are made and will be executed at once:
I. General Osterhaus will continue, as heretofore, to hold the fortified position on Black River, at the railroad bridge, with patrols and guards, watching the river below as far as Baldwin's, and up as far as Bridgeport; his reserves at Clear Creek, near Bovina.
[excerpt]
V. General W. S. Smith will hold as now his position at Oak Ridge Post-Office, with guards forward on the two Benton roads, and his right connecting with General Parke, at Mrs. Nelly's. General Smith, in connection with General Washburn, will effectually blockade all roads and paths coming from the north and lying between the ridge road and Yazoo Valley road.
VI. General Washburn will hold the fortified position at Haynes' Bluff, with Kimball's division, and will continue to strengthen the lines on the north front. That being our strongest front, we should invite attack in that quarter.
VII. This disposition of forces makes a connected line from the railroad bridge to Haynes' Bluff, by Tiffin, Wixon's, McCall's, Nelly's, and Oak Ridge. Each corps and division commander will proceed to entrench a position near his key-point, sufficient for two batteries and one brigade, commanding water, and looking to the east and north. All roads to the rear should be improved; a double track for wagons made by opening fences and trimming out woods. Lateral roads should also be looked to, to facilitate concentration and lateral movements. Roads to the front should be obstructed, except such as are necessary for our guards and our own use. The commanding general, after careful personal inspection, pronounces the points from which we have most reason to apprehend danger, to be the two fords at Messenger's, and about a mile below Birdsong, Wixon's, and Nelly's are the best points for concentration, and the ridges by Fox's and Markham's the best lines of operation.
VIII. All the cavalry not absolutely needed for orderlies and patrols will be massed under command of Colonel Bussey, Third Iowa, on Bear Creek, from Young's up to Harris', and is charged specially to watch the lower Benton road and the ford below Birdsong.
IX. All commanders of corps and divisions, and the chief of cavalry, will report by letter or staff officer daily to the commanding general at his bivouac near Tuttle's.
By order of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman:
[L. M. DAYTON,]
Aide-de-Camp.
--------------------------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#19
HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
Camp near Bear Creek, July 3, 1863.
Col. JOHN A. RAWLINS:
DEAR COLONEL: I am in receipt of two dispatches from General Grant, telling me of the opening of negotiations for the surrender of Vicksburg, and ordering me to move against Johnston and to destroy the Central road as far north as Grenada, and generally to do the enemy as much damage as possible. I have heard some considerable heavy firing at Vicksburg this afternoon, which I do not understand, and am this moment (sundown) in receipt of a letter from Clark Wright, which I inclose.(*) I have so little faith in Colonel Wright that I would heed his messages very little, only I feel assured that every motive that could influence Johnston is at work to make him attempt to relieve Vicksburg, that I am willing to believe he is concentrating at Bolton. If so, well, and better still if Vicksburg has surrendered. I send these papers in for the information of General Grant, who to-night will have arrived at some real conclusion and will be prepared to act.
[excerpt]
I propose that Ord move out to the railroad bridge, my corps to Messinger's, Parke's in reserve to cross at same point, and W. S. Smith's division, with the cavalry, not exceeding 1,000 men, to cross at the ford below Birdsong; that all meet on the Bridgeport road, about 8 miles out, and move on Bolton, then direct on Jackson, and, if necessary, to *******n, destroying, of course, the railroad and doing all manner of harm; then return to Jackson, whence I could send back to Vicksburg all troops not absolutely needed for the trip up to Grenada and back. Port Hudson is now well invested, and an increased force there could do less good than the destruction of the only army that can afford them relief, viz, Johnston's. But as soon as Johnston is met, and either defeated or dispersed, a force could go to Banks. I think the fall of Vicksburg, when known, will paralyze the Confederates west of the Mississippi, for Port Hudson was only used in connection with Vicksburg to make the intervening space a mare clausum, to which these forts gave the enemy absolute title. If these my views meet the general's approval, I ask the issue of a special order from your headquarters that Ord's corps move to railroad bridge, provided with five days' rations and 150 rounds of cartridges; the Fifteenth to be ordered to come forward, provided in like manner with the same rations and ammunition, and order J. Condit Smith to organize a train of 200 wagons, with bread, salt, sugar, and coffee, to come forward in two trains by the same roads behind the troops; for all my staff to come forward at once, and, generally, all orders that will initiate the movement. As you see, I must still watch Johnston, and these preparations can be made better at your end. This would leave McPherson's corps at Vicksburg, Herron's division disposable, one brigade of which could hold the works at the railroad bridge, and Kimball's division at Haynes' Bluff.

Indeed, in the movement against Johnston we should risk nothing, provided Vicksburg is surely surrendered. The news is so good I can hardly believe it, and I am confused by the sound of cannon at Vicksburg this p.m.

I keep a swift officer at the telegraph office. 3 miles back, to bring me the earliest intelligence. If all is right and Vicksburg is surrendered, after ordering troops to move as suggested, it may be well to order my quartermaster, J. Condit Smith, to ride out quickly to see me after ordering 200 wagons to load as before recited. Also send me plenty of the best maps Wilson has. I have left mine behind and must depend on Wilson.
W. T. SHERMAN.
-----

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#19
HEADQUARTERS EXPEDITION, FOX'S, July 4, 1863. General GRANT:
Your dispatch announcing the magnitude of the capture of Vicksburg is most gratifying; the importance of the place in our case cannot be exaggerated.

I have left Kimball's division at Haynes' Bluff, with instructions to picket at Oak Ridge. I will order General McArthur to relieve Osterhaus at the bridge to-morrow, so that Osterhaus may report to General Ord. Three bridges will be built to-morrow at Birdsong, Messinger's, and the railroad crossing. To-morrow, I suppose, Ord and Steele will be up, so that next day I will cross and move in force on Bolton.

The enemy showed one gun opposite Messinger's, [near] this place; I am willing he should meet us at once, the nearer the river the better. If he declines, I will follow promptly to Clinton; then I can discover if Johnston is scattered or concentrated, when I will act accordingly. I have not yet heard if the prisoners are to be paroled here or sent north. The farmers and families out here acknowledge the magnitude of this loss, and now beg to know their fate. All crops are destroyed and cattle eaten up. You will give their case your attention as soon as more important business is disposed of. At least I promise them this. I advise, then, if you find a locomotive, that you run cars out to Big Black River and make that a depot.

Please tell Wilson or [Miles D.] McAlester about the maps east of Big Black River; I am without any. I feel an intense curiosity to see Vicksburg and its people, but recognize importance of my present task, and think of nothing else. I will keep few orderlies at Osterhaus', which is now my nearest telegraph office.
W. T. SHERMAN.
-----
continued
 



Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top