NC Discovery Of A Nearly-forgotten Freedmen's Cemetery In Zebulon, Nc

A. Roy

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
Location
Raleigh, North Carolina
I've been studying the Highs, a well-known family in Zebulon, NC, many of whom are descendants of freedmen from the antebellum High farm in Wakefield, a community that was annexed to Zebulon in the 20th century. Recently, I learned about a High family cemetery off of Riley Hill Rd. in Zebulon, and decided to visit it to see if I could learn more about the family there. What I discovered was an all-but-forgotten burial ground grown over by pine woods and nearly unrecognizable.

20210203125330_IMG_1076.jpg


I came to know about the High family because one of its earlier-known members, Isaac High, was an enslaved worker conscripted to work on the Raleigh fortifications in 1863. I wanted to profile him in the book I'm working on, so I looked into his family history a bit. His Confederate pension application says that he was owned by John Green High of Wakefield, son of Delaney High. A history of Zebulon provides this tidbit of history:

Byzilla Merritt High
“Wakefield also has a rich history all its own. The small community was founded around the 1850s and was a voting precinct by 1861... Wakefield was the halfway point on the stage route between Raleigh and Rocky Mount. Wakefield also contains property that was known as High Town which was land given to freed slaves who took the name of their former owners, High.” (Cunningham, Mary; and associates. Zebulon, Wake County: A Community Diagnosis Including Secondary Data Analysis and Qualitative Data Collection. Chapel Hill NC: School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, 30 April 1998. Page 7.)

On Find A Grave, I found a page for a High Family Cemetery, and wrote to some of the commenters there. One member of the High family wrote back and gave me some information about the possible location of this cemetery. (The abandoned cemetery she pointed to turned out not to be the one pictured at Find A Grave, so there's more to be learned about interment locations for the Highs.) But she did share some information that led me to the Riley Hill cemetery, and confirmed that this is the location of a freedmen's burial ground:

"Henry High was my great-grandfather... Henry High lived on what was called Wakefield-Riley Rd (now it's just called Riley Hill Rd). According to my family notes the cemetery was across the street from Henry's house. Byggie was laid to rest in the family cemetery across the road on a hill from the house. According to Toney Funeral Home in Zebulon, the address is 8220 Riley Hill Rd." (Personal email communication.)

The Byggie mentioned here is Byzilla Merritt High (1829-1920), wife of Willis Henry High (1833-?). Her photo here is courtesy of R. High-Martin.

The information from my High family source helped me to locate the cemetery through the Wake County property maps (Wake County iMAPS, Wake.gov):

HighCemetery_ZebulonNC_WakeCtyiMaps.png


From this, I was able to identify the cemetery with this patch of trees about 150' x 180' on Wynnscott Farm Ln. off of Riley Hill Rd., about two miles northwest of the center of Zebulon, and between Riley Hill Rd. and US 264 (Source: Google Maps):

HighCemetery_ZebulonNC_GoogleSat_Markup.png


As you can see from my first photo, this cemetery is quite grown up with pine trees, and the ground covered with tree litter. I found about 10 grave markers, some of stone, and some in the form of metal memorial plaques (perhaps someone like @John Winn will know the correct term for these markers). I was only able to make out an inscription on one marker, a metal plaque for Elbert (Jack) High, who died 1 March 1965 at age 55 or 56. Census records for 1920 show an Elbert High at age 12 in Little River, NC (the Wake County township where Zebulon is located). That would be about the right age for the Elbert who died in 1965. The census record shows him living with his grandparents, "Iaach" and Flora High -- I believe the grandfather to be Isaiah High, with his name misspelled on the census list.

These photos show the various stones and metal markers that I found:

20210203123719_IMG_1038.jpg



20210203124334_IMG_1042.jpg



20210203124402_IMG_1044.jpg



20210203124526_IMG_1048.jpg



20210203124552_IMG_1051.jpg


20210203124724_IMG_1053.jpg


20210203125315_IMG_1075.jpg


20210203125330_IMG_1076.jpg


20210203125730_IMG_1087.jpg


20210203125906_IMG_1091.jpg


20210203130557_IMG_1102.jpg


This burial ground seems like a good target for a preservation effort (but, er, not by me). I did suggest that to the High family member I was in touch with. In case she decides to follow up, is there a good source of information for how to carry out a preservation project? I imagine as a minimum one could start by removing tree litter, hoping to uncover grave markers that might have sunk or fallen flat. But I also imagine there are precautions that have to be taken.

Here's a final question: Is it just my imagination, or do the pine trees seem to be growing in rows? And could that indicate something about the original layout of this cemetery? Here's a marked up detail from the Google map:

CemeteryRows_Google.png


Roy B.

HighCemetery_ZebulonNC_GoogleSat.png
 
Last edited:

John Winn

Major
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
State of Jefferson
That's some great work. Thanks for sharing !

I've actually not seen an 'official' term for those metal markers supplied by funeral homes other than just "temporary markers." They are placed by whoever does the burial. Often there's never any follow-up. We've got a few from the 1930s that can still be read but generally they're only good for maybe a decade before the glass gets broken and the paper dissolves and all you have are remnants of the metal itself. Where there's cattle or high humidity they don't last as long. I have seen a few where the name and dates were printed on aluminum but they seem to be very uncommon. At least you know there's a burial.
 

A. Roy

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
Location
Raleigh, North Carolina
I've actually not seen an 'official' term for those metal markers supplied by funeral homes other than just "temporary markers." They are placed by whoever does the burial. Often there's never any follow-up. We've got a few from the 1930s that can still be read but generally they're only good for maybe a decade before the glass gets broken and the paper dissolves and all you have are remnants of the metal itself.

Elbert High was the only one that I could read, and it seems to have been preserved quite well, considering it's 55 years old! The inscription seems to have been typed on a paper form, but there's a plastic or glass cover that has protected it. I saw another one that looked like it might have been legible, but it was bent over close to the ground, so I couldn't read it -- didn't want to disturb it.

Roy B.
 

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
What an interesting post! And yes, the trees are planted in rows. Pine trees are shade intolerant, so they need to have plenty of sunlight and be well spaced apart to grow. Probably meant to provide shade for any member of the family that wanted to visit and picnic in the graveyard. I’m so glad you found it. Perhaps the local historical society? If there is a University nearby they might be of service as well.
 

CowCavalry

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 17, 2017
Here's a final question: Is it just my imagination, or do the pine trees seem to be growing in rows? And could that indicate something about the original layout of this cemetery? Here's a marked up detail from the Google map:
Judging from the variety of size pines growing there, from massive mature pines, to saplings, I would speculate that they were not planted. Maybe at some point for some reason or another someone "thinned" the stand of pines there leaving the impression of rows?
 

nc native

Sergeant
Joined
Aug 30, 2011
Location
NC Piedmont
That's a wonderful and meaningful discovery you made there! Hopefully this cemetery will now receive some historical recognition and won't be paved over for a new road project or have houses built over it as much of Wake County is being overdeveloped these days. Seeing those pictures has lit a fire under me to go out soon and take a second look at a couple of spots I know that have always looked like they could be unknown gravesites.
 
Joined
May 12, 2018
Agreed, it would seem that an existing stand of pines was thinned to create a nicely wooded cemetery and later abandoned, so saplings grew up around them. I wonder at point it stopped being maintained as a cemetery? Presumably it was sometime in the 1960s...
 

A. Roy

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
Location
Raleigh, North Carolina
That's a wonderful and meaningful discovery you made there! Hopefully this cemetery will now receive some historical recognition and won't be paved over for a new road project or have houses built over it as much of Wake County is being overdeveloped these days.

I’m so glad you found it. Perhaps the local historical society? If there is a University nearby they might be of service as well.

The High family is quite large, I think, and many of them still live in the area of Zebulon. I would think cleaning up this cemetery and uncovering the grave markers could make a nice project for a group of family volunteers. Seems like I've seen articles about that kind of project, but I don't know anything about proper procedures, etc.

Roy B.
 
Joined
May 12, 2018
One would I think have to look into the relevant laws in your state & in Zebulon. I imagine having the volunteers be family members would be helpful to the case. I think the site might even warrant some archeological research. I don’t imagine there is much in the way of scholarship on 19th century African American cemeteries and the site may afford a opportunity to get a better idea not only about the lives of freedmen but by extension life under slavery and the last effects it had on the body that might make excavation worth it. Geophysics needs to be done on the site as well, as it’s extent and the number of burials could then be determined. But the ground there might not be ideal for it, you’d have to ask an archeologist.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
In NC it looks like you can make county commissioners aware and if wishing it maintained/restored you give least $5000 to the county clerk. It will be invested and returns used for perpetual care....so if want much care probably want to give more then 5k.......

Generally should exercise caution as in some states it's illegal to do much to a private abandoned cemetery without permits.

Around here the general attitude is leave abandoned cemeteries alone.
 
Last edited:

John Winn

Major
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
State of Jefferson
Judging from the variety of size pines growing there, from massive mature pines, to saplings, I would speculate that they were not planted. Maybe at some point for some reason or another someone "thinned" the stand of pines there leaving the impression of rows?
As a retired forester I agree (and was just about to post when I saw yours). Pines are shade intolerant so that's true. This is not a plantation, though (which would all be the same diameter and evenly spaced). I'd say the diameters of the smaller trees reflect their position in the understory and being outcompeted. That's actually cool as there are many places where natural stands of pine no longer exist.
 

lupaglupa

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 18, 2019
@A. Roy this is wonderful - what a great find. These old family cemeteries are so sad, it's hard to maintain them and when left alone they become unrecognizable. Many are then destroyed by folks who don't know they are there. While clearing this one might be too big a project for the family, is it possible that the site could be listed? That might preserve the land from development and let the High family members buried there rest in peace.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
That's some great work. Thanks for sharing !

I've actually not seen an 'official' term for those metal markers supplied by funeral homes other than just "temporary markers." They are placed by whoever does the burial. Often there's never any follow-up. We've got a few from the 1930s that can still be read but generally they're only good for maybe a decade before the glass gets broken and the paper dissolves and all you have are remnants of the metal itself. Where there's cattle or high humidity they don't last as long. I have seen a few where the name and dates were printed on aluminum but they seem to be very uncommon. At least you know there's a burial.
You are correct on the metal markers John. I once worked at a funeral home for several years and those markers are called temporary markers
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
I've been studying the Highs, a well-known family in Zebulon, NC, many of whom are descendants of freedmen from the antebellum High farm in Wakefield, a community that was annexed to Zebulon in the 20th century. Recently, I learned about a High family cemetery off of Riley Hill Rd. in Zebulon, and decided to visit it to see if I could learn more about the family there. What I discovered was an all-but-forgotten burial ground grown over by pine woods and nearly unrecognizable.

View attachment 389969

I came to know about the High family because one of its earlier-known members, Isaac High, was an enslaved worker conscripted to work on the Raleigh fortifications in 1863. I wanted to profile him in the book I'm working on, so I looked into his family history a bit. His Confederate pension application says that he was owned by John Green High of Wakefield, son of Delaney High. A history of Zebulon provides this tidbit of history:

View attachment 389970“Wakefield also has a rich history all its own. The small community was founded around the 1850s and was a voting precinct by 1861... Wakefield was the halfway point on the stage route between Raleigh and Rocky Mount. Wakefield also contains property that was known as High Town which was land given to freed slaves who took the name of their former owners, High.” (Cunningham, Mary; and associates. Zebulon, Wake County: A Community Diagnosis Including Secondary Data Analysis and Qualitative Data Collection. Chapel Hill NC: School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, 30 April 1998. Page 7.)

On Find A Grave, I found a page for a High Family Cemetery, and wrote to some of the commenters there. One member of the High family wrote back and gave me some information about the possible location of this cemetery. (The abandoned cemetery she pointed to turned out not to be the one pictured at Find A Grave, so there's more to be learned about interment locations for the Highs.) But she did share some information that led me to the Riley Hill cemetery, and confirmed that this is the location of a freedmen's burial ground:

"Henry High was my great-grandfather... Henry High lived on what was called Wakefield-Riley Rd (now it's just called Riley Hill Rd). According to my family notes the cemetery was across the street from Henry's house. Byggie was laid to rest in the family cemetery across the road on a hill from the house. According to Toney Funeral Home in Zebulon, the address is 8220 Riley Hill Rd." (Personal email communication.)

The Byggie mentioned here is Byzilla Merritt High (1829-1920), wife of Willis Henry High (1833-?). Her photo here is courtesy of R. High-Martin.

The information from my High family source helped me to locate the cemetery through the Wake County property maps (Wake County iMAPS, Wake.gov):

View attachment 389971

From this, I was able to identify the cemetery with this patch of trees about 150' x 180' on Wynnscott Farm Ln. off of Riley Hill Rd., about two miles northwest of the center of Zebulon, and between Riley Hill Rd. and US 264 (Source: Google Maps):

View attachment 389977

As you can see from my first photo, this cemetery is quite grown up with pine trees, and the ground covered with tree litter. I found about 10 grave markers, some of stone, and some in the form of metal memorial plaques (perhaps someone like @John Winn will know the correct term for these markers). I was only able to make out an inscription on one marker, a metal plaque for Elbert (Jack) High, who died 1 March 1965 at age 55 or 56. Census records for 1920 show an Elbert High at age 12 in Little River, NC (the Wake County township where Zebulon is located). That would be about the right age for the Elbert who died in 1965. The census record shows him living with his grandparents, "Iaach" and Flora High -- I believe the grandfather to be Isaiah High, with his name misspelled on the census list.

These photos show the various stones and metal markers that I found:

View attachment 389985


View attachment 389986


View attachment 389987


View attachment 389988


View attachment 389989

View attachment 389990

View attachment 389991

View attachment 389992

View attachment 389993

View attachment 389994

View attachment 389995

This burial ground seems like a good target for a preservation effort (but, er, not by me). I did suggest that to the High family member I was in touch with. In case she decides to follow up, is there a good source of information for how to carry out a preservation project? I imagine as a minimum one could start by removing tree litter, hoping to uncover grave markers that might have sunk or fallen flat. But I also imagine there are precautions that have to be taken.

Here's a final question: Is it just my imagination, or do the pine trees seem to be growing in rows? And could that indicate something about the original layout of this cemetery? Here's a marked up detail from the Google map:

View attachment 389997

Roy B.

View attachment 389976
Great piece of detactive work.
I've been studying the Highs, a well-known family in Zebulon, NC, many of whom are descendants of freedmen from the antebellum High farm in Wakefield, a community that was annexed to Zebulon in the 20th century. Recently, I learned about a High family cemetery off of Riley Hill Rd. in Zebulon, and decided to visit it to see if I could learn more about the family there. What I discovered was an all-but-forgotten burial ground grown over by pine woods and nearly unrecognizable.

View attachment 389969

I came to know about the High family because one of its earlier-known members, Isaac High, was an enslaved worker conscripted to work on the Raleigh fortifications in 1863. I wanted to profile him in the book I'm working on, so I looked into his family history a bit. His Confederate pension application says that he was owned by John Green High of Wakefield, son of Delaney High. A history of Zebulon provides this tidbit of history:

View attachment 389970“Wakefield also has a rich history all its own. The small community was founded around the 1850s and was a voting precinct by 1861... Wakefield was the halfway point on the stage route between Raleigh and Rocky Mount. Wakefield also contains property that was known as High Town which was land given to freed slaves who took the name of their former owners, High.” (Cunningham, Mary; and associates. Zebulon, Wake County: A Community Diagnosis Including Secondary Data Analysis and Qualitative Data Collection. Chapel Hill NC: School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, 30 April 1998. Page 7.)

On Find A Grave, I found a page for a High Family Cemetery, and wrote to some of the commenters there. One member of the High family wrote back and gave me some information about the possible location of this cemetery. (The abandoned cemetery she pointed to turned out not to be the one pictured at Find A Grave, so there's more to be learned about interment locations for the Highs.) But she did share some information that led me to the Riley Hill cemetery, and confirmed that this is the location of a freedmen's burial ground:

"Henry High was my great-grandfather... Henry High lived on what was called Wakefield-Riley Rd (now it's just called Riley Hill Rd). According to my family notes the cemetery was across the street from Henry's house. Byggie was laid to rest in the family cemetery across the road on a hill from the house. According to Toney Funeral Home in Zebulon, the address is 8220 Riley Hill Rd." (Personal email communication.)

The Byggie mentioned here is Byzilla Merritt High (1829-1920), wife of Willis Henry High (1833-?). Her photo here is courtesy of R. High-Martin.

The information from my High family source helped me to locate the cemetery through the Wake County property maps (Wake County iMAPS, Wake.gov):

View attachment 389971

From this, I was able to identify the cemetery with this patch of trees about 150' x 180' on Wynnscott Farm Ln. off of Riley Hill Rd., about two miles northwest of the center of Zebulon, and between Riley Hill Rd. and US 264 (Source: Google Maps):

View attachment 389977

As you can see from my first photo, this cemetery is quite grown up with pine trees, and the ground covered with tree litter. I found about 10 grave markers, some of stone, and some in the form of metal memorial plaques (perhaps someone like @John Winn will know the correct term for these markers). I was only able to make out an inscription on one marker, a metal plaque for Elbert (Jack) High, who died 1 March 1965 at age 55 or 56. Census records for 1920 show an Elbert High at age 12 in Little River, NC (the Wake County township where Zebulon is located). That would be about the right age for the Elbert who died in 1965. The census record shows him living with his grandparents, "Iaach" and Flora High -- I believe the grandfather to be Isaiah High, with his name misspelled on the census list.

These photos show the various stones and metal markers that I found:

View attachment 389985


View attachment 389986


View attachment 389987


View attachment 389988


View attachment 389989

View attachment 389990

View attachment 389991

View attachment 389992

View attachment 389993

View attachment 389994

View attachment 389995

This burial ground seems like a good target for a preservation effort (but, er, not by me). I did suggest that to the High family member I was in touch with. In case she decides to follow up, is there a good source of information for how to carry out a preservation project? I imagine as a minimum one could start by removing tree litter, hoping to uncover grave markers that might have sunk or fallen flat. But I also imagine there are precautions that have to be taken.

Here's a final question: Is it just my imagination, or do the pine trees seem to be growing in rows? And could that indicate something about the original layout of this cemetery? Here's a marked up detail from the Google map:

View attachment 389997

Roy B.

View attachment 389976
I've been studying the Highs, a well-known family in Zebulon, NC, many of whom are descendants of freedmen from the antebellum High farm in Wakefield, a community that was annexed to Zebulon in the 20th century. Recently, I learned about a High family cemetery off of Riley Hill Rd. in Zebulon, and decided to visit it to see if I could learn more about the family there. What I discovered was an all-but-forgotten burial ground grown over by pine woods and nearly unrecognizable.

View attachment 389969

I came to know about the High family because one of its earlier-known members, Isaac High, was an enslaved worker conscripted to work on the Raleigh fortifications in 1863. I wanted to profile him in the book I'm working on, so I looked into his family history a bit. His Confederate pension application says that he was owned by John Green High of Wakefield, son of Delaney High. A history of Zebulon provides this tidbit of history:

View attachment 389970“Wakefield also has a rich history all its own. The small community was founded around the 1850s and was a voting precinct by 1861... Wakefield was the halfway point on the stage route between Raleigh and Rocky Mount. Wakefield also contains property that was known as High Town which was land given to freed slaves who took the name of their former owners, High.” (Cunningham, Mary; and associates. Zebulon, Wake County: A Community Diagnosis Including Secondary Data Analysis and Qualitative Data Collection. Chapel Hill NC: School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, 30 April 1998. Page 7.)

On Find A Grave, I found a page for a High Family Cemetery, and wrote to some of the commenters there. One member of the High family wrote back and gave me some information about the possible location of this cemetery. (The abandoned cemetery she pointed to turned out not to be the one pictured at Find A Grave, so there's more to be learned about interment locations for the Highs.) But she did share some information that led me to the Riley Hill cemetery, and confirmed that this is the location of a freedmen's burial ground:

"Henry High was my great-grandfather... Henry High lived on what was called Wakefield-Riley Rd (now it's just called Riley Hill Rd). According to my family notes the cemetery was across the street from Henry's house. Byggie was laid to rest in the family cemetery across the road on a hill from the house. According to Toney Funeral Home in Zebulon, the address is 8220 Riley Hill Rd." (Personal email communication.)

The Byggie mentioned here is Byzilla Merritt High (1829-1920), wife of Willis Henry High (1833-?). Her photo here is courtesy of R. High-Martin.

The information from my High family source helped me to locate the cemetery through the Wake County property maps (Wake County iMAPS, Wake.gov):

View attachment 389971

From this, I was able to identify the cemetery with this patch of trees about 150' x 180' on Wynnscott Farm Ln. off of Riley Hill Rd., about two miles northwest of the center of Zebulon, and between Riley Hill Rd. and US 264 (Source: Google Maps):

View attachment 389977

As you can see from my first photo, this cemetery is quite grown up with pine trees, and the ground covered with tree litter. I found about 10 grave markers, some of stone, and some in the form of metal memorial plaques (perhaps someone like @John Winn will know the correct term for these markers). I was only able to make out an inscription on one marker, a metal plaque for Elbert (Jack) High, who died 1 March 1965 at age 55 or 56. Census records for 1920 show an Elbert High at age 12 in Little River, NC (the Wake County township where Zebulon is located). That would be about the right age for the Elbert who died in 1965. The census record shows him living with his grandparents, "Iaach" and Flora High -- I believe the grandfather to be Isaiah High, with his name misspelled on the census list.

These photos show the various stones and metal markers that I found:

View attachment 389985


View attachment 389986


View attachment 389987


View attachment 389988


View attachment 389989

View attachment 389990

View attachment 389991

View attachment 389992

View attachment 389993

View attachment 389994

View attachment 389995

This burial ground seems like a good target for a preservation effort (but, er, not by me). I did suggest that to the High family member I was in touch with. In case she decides to follow up, is there a good source of information for how to carry out a preservation project? I imagine as a minimum one could start by removing tree litter, hoping to uncover grave markers that might have sunk or fallen flat. But I also imagine there are precautions that have to be taken.

Here's a final question: Is it just my imagination, or do the pine trees seem to be growing in rows? And could that indicate something about the original layout of this cemetery? Here's a marked up detail from the Google map:

View attachment 389997

Roy B.

View attachment 389976
Great piece of detactive work. Thanks for sharing
 

Lubliner

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
My big question about all of this, based on interest in the topic, is the cemetery owned by the land-holder there, and is it a High descendant? I can hardly imagine knocking on a door of a stranger and asking if I could look into their woodlot nearby, regardless of my reasons.
Lubliner.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
My big question about all of this, based on interest in the topic, is the cemetery owned by the land-holder there, and is it a High descendant? I can hardly imagine knocking on a door of a stranger and asking if I could look into their woodlot nearby, regardless of my reasons.
Lubliner.
Why the general attitude here is to leave them alone.

If the landowner wanted it kept up, or more well known, and people trapseing around his property, he would have allready made a preservation effort. So he might not be happy someone else doing so

If the family or families who neither had erected headstones, or been doing any upkeep and maintenance had wanted to, they would have allready had done so....they might not appreciate being called out and their past behavior of neglect being known.

I know of 2 nearby where landowners do keep em up somewhat by their own efforts, and several that are abandoned and neglected, and some that "dissappeared" over the years.

Though most the ones I know of here date to 1800's. Kinda shook my head of temporary markers from more recent times....and families neglecting to erect any real markers. Are you sure it wasn't used as a pauper cemetery.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
My big question about all of this, based on interest in the topic, is the cemetery owned by the land-holder there, and is it a High descendant? I can hardly imagine knocking on a door of a stranger and asking if I could look into their woodlot nearby, regardless of my reasons.
Lubliner.
Good point Lubliner.
I was also wondering if there might be a local group that would volunteer to clean up the trees and grounds. I know a group I am associated with locally here in Virginia that have several “forgotten “ cemeteries we maintain. I ‘ll bet there’s one in that region that does the same.
 

redbob

Major
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Location
Hoover, Alabama
You plant pine trees in rows if you are attempting a windbreak or in the case of a pine plantation, you are planning on harvesting them. When I found the location of my G-G-Grandfathers family's cemetery the pine trees were planted in circular rows around the cemetery.
 

A. Roy

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
Location
Raleigh, North Carolina
If the landowner wanted it kept up, or more well known, and people trapseing around his property, he would have allready made a preservation effort. So he might not be happy someone else doing so
All good questions here. In the Wake County property records, no owner is listed for this property. In that field, only the word "Cemetary" appears, spelled that way. Makes me wonder whether this might be a class of property that is just perpetually semi-public. The High family member I'm in touch with seems interested in cleaning up the plot. Her great-grandmother is buried there. I encouraged her to look up the relevant regulations and procedures, also to read through the excellent comments here.

Here is the text of the property record for this plot:

Property:1796317437

PIN1796317437
Real Estate ID0189902
Map Name1796 03
OwnerCEMETARY
Mailing Address 1UNKNOWN
Mailing Address 2RALEIGH NC 27636
Mailing Address 3
Deed Book001159
Deed Page0000E
Deed Date01/01/1987
Deeded Acreage0.50
Assessed Building Value0.00
Assessed Land Value9,000.00
Total Assessed Value9,000.00
Billing ClassExempt
Property DescriptionCEMETERY
Heated Area
Site Address0 RILEY HILL RD
City
TownshipLittle River
Year Built
Total Sale Price
Sale Date
Type and Use
Design Style
Land ClassCemetery
Exempt DescriptionCEMETERY
Exempt Status782
Ownership1,060
Activity9,000
Function9,900
Structure9,000
Site6,600
Total Structures1
Total Units0
Old Parcel Number420-00000-0082


Roy B.
 
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