Restricted Did the Lost Cause myth have any positive effects?

Will Carry

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Location
The Tar Heel State.
I have been thinking about "The Lost Cause" and how the North and South emerged from that deadly struggle so.....smoothly. (smoothly for white people. Not for freed slaves or Indians) Could it be that the lost cause myth actual helped the North and South reconcile with each other? Could this belief, even though it was not correct, have made a difference in this country licking it's wounds? Is my this line of thinking also a myth and the North and South were too busy conquering the West and acquiring free land to hold grudges?
Am I communicating this right? I am not much of a Word Smith.....................
 

WJC

Major General
Judge Adv. Genl.
Thread Medic
Answered the Call for Reinforcements
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
It certainly was perceived in a positive light by many Southerners. From our vantage point years later, it is clear that for too long it prevented Americans from resolving the most serious social and political problems that had plagued our nation.
In the end, our experience with the 'Lost Cause' only reinforces what our parents taught us: excuses are never acceptable.
 

Will Carry

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Location
The Tar Heel State.
Thanks WJC for the feedback. I feel that, during reconstruction and Jim Crowe, the white Southerners suffered from misplaced anger. Somehow blaming the former slaves for the heart ache, the decimation of the South and the humiliation of defeat. I have always wondered why some white people in the South had such a burning hatred that they defied their religion and fueled their hatred with violence.
I just read a book titled "Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America." About Thurgood Marshall defending 4 boys accused of rape in the deep south. I highly recommend this book. After becoming a member of this forum I realized that I stopped reading about the Civil War at Appomattox and that I knew little about reconstruction. I know a little about Jim Crowe because I grew up in Conyers Georgia in the late fifties and early sixties.
 

Rebforever

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Oct 26, 2012
Thanks WJC for the feedback. I feel that, during reconstruction and Jim Crowe, the white Southerners suffered from misplaced anger. Somehow blaming the former slaves for the heart ache, the decimation of the South and the humiliation of defeat. I have always wondered why some white people in the South had such a burning hatred that they defied their religion and fueled their hatred with violence.
I just read a book titled "Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America." About Thurgood Marshall defending 4 boys accused of rape in the deep south. I highly recommend this book. After becoming a member of this forum I realized that I stopped reading about the Civil War at Appomattox and that I knew little about reconstruction. I know a little about Jim Crowe because I grew up in Conyers Georgia in the late fifties and early sixties.
My Hilite

The South had to live with the end of the War. But they were dissed when the Union Army occupied the South after the war. That was when the Carpetbaggers and scalawags took as much from the freed slaves (Reconstruction Money from favoritism). That is what divided the slaves from the Southern People who lost everything too.
 

thomas aagaard

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Location
Denmark
yes and no.

The south got off easy compared to how rebellions in Europe was usually put down.
This and how former rebels was allowed back in political leadership (at the expense of the freemen) helped a lot unifying the country again.
Sure a lot more of the white population was now a lot worse of compared to before he war, but the south still ended up with a white ruling class again.
And this pushed the racial issue 100 years down the road.

Had serious afford been put into rebuilding the south, with the freemen fully integrated both in the economy and legally and politically, the racism issue might have been way less of an issue later.

But it would have required the country to spend a lot of money on this. (compare my idea to the Marshall help post wwii)
And a lot would have gone to help improve the situation for the colored population.

There where clearly no real interest in doing this... and Iam highly critical of the ability of the federal government to do it... even if the will had been there. (corruption was the norm and in some cases even legal)
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Will Carry

The Lost Cause Mythology was a fictional creation of the Great American Elites of the conservative/reactionary types from both North and South. Its purpose was to establish the old way of doing business minus human slavery and maintaining racial caste system. There was enormous pressure to return the Cotton industry among others and prove free laborers system was superior to the old slave system. Northerners and Southerners united around the Cult of White Supremacy or at least those great numbers in which such issues were sacred despite it being a falsehood. Reconstruction’s short history was a revolutionary social experiment that produced a number of benefits to southerners; but because it threaten the cited above Elites purposes; it was to be crushed and it’s history falsified for decades. Tragically, when the Civil War ended, a vicious economic depression improvised the South causing great sufferings. President Andrew Johnson was an enemy of Reconstruction of the South and leader of those Elites cited above. Most Planters returned to their properties and social/political/economic domination but it was the depression that oppressed them not Northerners/Carpetbaggers/ETC. The latter is part of that Lost Cause Myth.
 

Will Carry

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Location
The Tar Heel State.
Thank you Thomas (The Dane) and Jayhawker for trying to explain a very complex time in American history. I feel very strongly now that learning about reconstruction and Jim Crow, is essential. If either of you could recommend some reading material, I think I will get to work.
 

RobertP

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Nov 11, 2009
Location
Dallas
Will Carry

The Lost Cause Mythology was a fictional creation of the Great American Elites of the conservative/reactionary types from both North and South. Its purpose was to establish the old way of doing business minus human slavery and maintaining racial caste system. There was enormous pressure to return the Cotton industry among others and prove free laborers system was superior to the old slave system. Northerners and Southerners united around the Cult of White Supremacy or at least those great numbers in which such issues were sacred despite it being a falsehood. Reconstruction’s short history was a revolutionary social experiment that produced a number of benefits to southerners; but because it threaten the cited above Elites purposes; it was to be crushed and it’s history falsified for decades. Tragically, when the Civil War ended, a vicious economic depression improvised the South causing great sufferings. President Andrew Johnson was an enemy of Reconstruction of the South and leader of those Elites cited above. Most Planters returned to their properties and social/political/economic domination but it was the depression that oppressed them not Northerners/Carpetbaggers/ETC. The latter is part of that Lost Cause Myth.
You know, the whole thing could have been avoided if the Northern elite and not so elite had welcomed freedmen into their midst. Sadly they did not.
 

Rebforever

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Oct 26, 2012
Thank you Thomas (The Dane) and Jayhawker for trying to explain a very complex time in American history. I feel very strongly now that learning about reconstruction and Jim Crow, is essential. If either of you could recommend some reading material, I think I will get to work.
E.Merton Coulter - The South and Reconstruction.
 
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Joshism

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Location
Jupiter, FL
The Lost Cause is probably the biggest reason the American Civil War is as popular a topic as it is. How many wars in history do both sides remember fondly? Most wars one or both sides considers the conflict a tragic mistake they would rather forget.
 
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