Did the Confederate Armies bring Slaves with them?


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Pat Young

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#3
Slaves were used extensively. Some were servants to Confederate officers, brought from home at the start of the war. Others were used as teamsters by the armies. Much of the work of constructing fortifications was done by enslaved African Americans.
 
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Did the Confederate armies bring slaves with them? Were there slaves in Confederate forts?
There were also "free persons of color" that contracted themselves to Confederate officers, and in some cases enlisted men.

There are also instances of free men being enlisted and mustered as soldiers.

Free Persons of Color were also conscripted into the Confederate forces.
 
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n the book "A History Of Lumsden's Battery." the best part of the book was about day to day camp life. Some of the soldiers brought a slave with them, they would get fire wood, forage for food and do other chores vital to the men's well being. As I understanding it (correct me if I'm wrong) an officer could not give your slave an order. He could only give you an order. The slave was not a soldier but a civilian.
 
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#11
51Rlc7wMbqL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


The above book might be worth browsing. I haven't read it, but I understand it has a section on the uses of slave labor by the Confederate army. From the summary of the book online: "Slaves served by the tens of thousands in the Southern armies―never as soldiers, but as menial laborers who cooked meals, washed horses, and dug ditches."

This article is online, and is very useful: Looking for Bob: Black Confederate Pensioners After the Civil War, by James G. Hollandsworth, Jr. It has a very good discussion of the use of black labor by Confederates during the Civil War.

- Alan
 

TomP

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#14
The first image is of slaves, supervised by Confederate officers, working on the "Beauregard Line" of earthworks in Corinth during April-May, 1862. It is a charcoal drawing by William Sheppard, and the original is on display at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center.

1.jpg

The second image is of Contrabands strengthening the same earthworks adjacent to the Corinth Contraband Camp. This image is in pencil and was drawn by Alexander Simplot. The original is on display at Wilson's Creek National Battlefield.

CC.jpg


What is the difference? The Contrabands who worked in Corinth during the Union occupation, primarily during the period when the Contraband Camp was in existence, were all paid in cash for their labor. There is an excellent article about the camp by Cam Walker, an assistant professor of history at William & Mary. This article will soon be republished along with photographs and artwork, and will be available at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center and other locations.
http://mlsandy.home.tsixroads.com/Corinth_MLSANDY/histcw6.html
 

Tom Elmore

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#15
I estimate that from three to four thousand slaves accompanied the Confederate army during the Gettysburg campaign, although I have only been able to document 80 of them. Of the latter, the great majority were personal (body) servants and did not directly support the army in logistical roles. Most belonged to officers, but a quarter of them were associated with enlisted men.
 
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AUG

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As mentioned, many officers as well as enlisted men brought personal slaves, or "body servants," to war with them. Often it seems as though they ended up serving that officer or soldier's entire mess, if not their company, along with the other body servants. Some were very close to their masters and soldiers, and were treated as a fellow member of the mess; of course others took the chance to escape.

First photo attached below is a good image of a Confederate mess with their body servants in camp. Members of the Chestnut Light Artillery, Co. F of the 3rd South Carolina Artillery Battalion, on Stono Inlet near Charleston. Taken by George S. Cook.

Second image is of three officers and their body servant in Co. H, 57th Georgia Infantry. L-R: 1st Lt. Archibald C. McKinley, Capt. John Richard Bonner, Scott (McKinley's slave), and 2nd Lt. William S. Stetson.
 

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