Did the Confederacy have any real opportunity in far west?

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
It would appear that in the far west there was limited opportunity for Confederacy success. Was there any real chance for the Confederacy in the far west? I am not sure a difference commander would have made a real difference.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
The Confederacy hoped to take Southern California or Colorado, but I am not sure they had the military forces or logistics to do so. Both places would have put a real strain on the available supply lines. I would have to research the available man power available to the Union and the Confederacy in the far west.
 

Trooper "D"

Corporal
Joined
May 20, 2018
It would appear that in the far west there was limited opportunity for Confederacy success. Was there any real chance for the Confederacy in the far west? I am not sure a difference commander would have made a real difference.
A different commander could have made the difference. It all actually boiled down to their supply train being destroyed. Once that happened there was no hope. So if they could have avoided that event there is a possibility of some success. Could they have gone to the Pacific Ocean with their Confederacy? I don't see the numbers of troops available to hold all that territory.
Just my opinion.
 

bayouace

Sergeant
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Location
Louisiana
I don't think commanders like Shelby and Marmaduke were the problem. Certainly not Taylor. Had Green commanded the Sibley force, who knows how it would have turned out. When cavalry enlistees had to bring everything they needed on their own- weapons, horses, clothes, saddles, blankets- it is obvious where the problem existed. Just my 2 cents.
 

Trooper "D"

Corporal
Joined
May 20, 2018
I don't think commanders like Shelby and Marmaduke were the problem. Certainly not Taylor. Had Green commanded the Sibley force, who knows how it would have turned out. When cavalry enlistees had to bring everything they needed on their own- weapons, horses, clothes, saddles, blankets- it is obvious where the problem existed. Just my 2 cents.
I think Green pretty much did command Sibley's force De facto. De facto da matter that Sibley's was drunk all the time.
 

jackt62

Captain
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
Going for the southwest territory was an overreach by the Confederacy. Ironically, Baylor and Sibley did make inroads in the New Mexico territory and even succeeded in establishing the only Confederate "capitol" in Mesilla, outside of the 11 Confederate states. That however, was shortlived and the hopes of the Confederacy were quickly dashed by mid 1862.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
The Confederacy hoped to take Southern California or Colorado, but I am not sure they had the military forces or logistics to do so. Both places would have put a real strain on the available supply lines. I would have to research the available man power available to the Union and the Confederacy in the far west.
If they set realistic goals, maybe. It didn't happen that way. They were also badly out numbered.
 
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