Did South Carolina's Declaration of Causes for Secession tell the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth?

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James Lutzweiler

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I, for one, certainly agree with the conclusion that with passing out copies of Helper's Impending Crisis and making it required reading wouldn't have endeared South Carolinians to the old union.
"wouldn't have"? Am I missing something? Would the North not love it, if SC passed these out all over the place?
 
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Lubliner

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The cause of secession?
A CAUSE FOR CIVIL WAR
Series 4, Volume 1, Section 1, Page 1
First; To A. B. Moore; “….on the grave and important state of our political relations with the Federal Government, and the duty of the slave-holding States in the matter of their rights and honor, so menacingly involved in matters connected with the institution of African slavery….”

“….the importance and the absolute necessity of the action of the southern States in resistance of that settled purpose of aggression on our constitutional and inherent rights by the majority of the people of the non-slave-holding States of the Federal Union, which purpose and intention has culminated in the election of a man to the Presidency of the United States whose opinions and constructions of constitutional duty are wholly incompatible with our safety in a longer union with them….”

“….that the time …[has] come when the enjoyment of peace and our rights as coequals in this confederacy were no longer to be expected or hoped for, and that the solemn duty now devolved upon us of separating from all political connection with the States so disregarding their constitutional obligations, and of forming such a government as a high sense of our rights, honor, and future peace and safety shall indicate….”

JOHN A. WINSTON-Alabama's Commissioner to Louisiana. Jan. 2, 1861.

Series 4, Volume 1, Section 1, Page 3.
Second; To A. B. Moore; "....I took the ground that no State which had seceded would ever go back without full power being given to protect themselves by vote against anti-slavery projects and schemes of every kind. I took the position that the Northern people were honest and did fear the Divine displeasure, both in this world and the world to come (hello), by reason of what they considered the national sin of slavery, and that all who agreed with me in a belief of their sincerely must see that we could not remain quietly in the same Government with them. Secondly, if they were dishonest hypocrites, and only lied to impose on others and make them hate us, and used anti-slavery arguments as mere pretexts for the purpose of uniting Northern sentiment against us, with a view to obtain political power and sectional dominion, in that event we ought not to live with them...."

DAVID HUBBARD-Alabama's Commissioner to Arkansas. Jan. 3, 1861.

My opinion is but a speck of dust in the eye.
Hope you are doing well James Lutzweiler. Have a Happy Labor Day.
Your friend,
Lubliner.
 

Lubliner

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Location
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The cause of complaint. [O. R. Series 4, Volume 1, Section 1, Page 4-8.]
Your OP gives the impression of a valid argument under Supreme Court Ruling; i.e. 'the whole truth and nothing but the truth.' Assuming the United States Supreme Court has already dealt a blow to the South on the Fugitive Slave Law, by allowing States to overrule the Federal Mandate of Authority, what further argument will be heard on the Southerners' behalf?
Again, you speak specifically about the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession, and I apologize for stating equal peer representations of reasons and complaints, but South Carolina was not alone in the movement to disrupt the Federal Government and claim disunion; maybe first, but backed by others.
Complaints of a simple enough nature I shall list and after each statement of complaint, one can mark as True or False.
1. The equality of all States of this confederacy, as well as the equality of rights of all citizens of the respective States of the Federal Constitution, is a fundamental principle in the scheme of the Federal Government; i.e. 'all states created to be equal'.
True or False?
2.The union of these States under the constitution was formed to "establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to her citizens and their posterity; i.e. '....of the free, for the free, by the free...."
True or False?
3. Each State is bound in good faith to observe and keep on her part all the stipulations and covenants for the benefit of other States, and all bound together in agreement. If any State violates these principles and rules, this compact agreement is broken.
True or False?
4. When the Federal Constitution was adopted, slavery existed in 12 of the 13 States. (T/F)
5. Slaves are recognized as both property and as a basis for political power in the Federal Compact (T/F).
6. Under the influences of climate and other causes, slavery has been banished in the Northern States. (T/F).
7. African Slavery has become a fixed domestic institution in the South (T/F).
8. This war is being waged against an institution, fanatically and unremittingly, for 25 years by 1861. (T/F).
9. The attacks are through literature, in their schools, in the market places, in legislative halls, through the public press, influencing the public mind and inciting hatred. (T/F).
10. The war is against the prosperity and wealth and political existence of Southern Equality. (T/F).
11. Southerners' rights are being forfeited whenever they travel north on business, by absconsion, outright theft of property, and by northerners aiding and abetting criminal trespass, and blaming the South. (T/F)
12. Southerners are arrested and imprisoned for moving toward judicial proceedings to reclaim their stock and property. (T/F).
13. Representation in the Halls of Congress no longer can be balanced so equal rights for all citizens of States can be reached fairly by agreement. (T/F).

By ending this on an uneven note there can be no tie, if you vote true or false for each argument proposed. ("Can you hear me now" is a good agreement for Alabama, Fort Sumter First being First and not Last....).

Is it alright to claim my position as a peer, or have I fouled by withholding various and sundry other reasons beyond just pointing out South Carolina?
Thanks,
Lubliner.
 
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