Did Maryland Ever Consider Remaining Neutral?

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Maryland supplied more Union troops then did Kentucky, 60k vs 50k for Kentucky.
Missouri supplied 30k plus Confederate troops for the Confederacy vs. an estimated 25k for Maryland. Maryland supplied about the same number of Confederate troops as did Kentucky.
I never read anything on Confederate guerrillas in Maryland. That deserves its own thread. It would be quite interesting.
Leftyhunter
I wasnt necessarily speaking of Elijah White and Harry gilmor as guerrillas operating in Maryland I ment more so that they were from Maryland most of there raids were in nearby Loudoun county Virginia and the Shenandoah but they also operated in Maryland gilmor went as far north as holding westminster Maryland for ransom but it is believed the mayor and him found common ground over a bottle of whiskey yo be honest I cannot find a concrete number of yankee kentuckians anywhere from 75k to 125k
 

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I wasnt necessarily speaking of Elijah White and Harry gilmor as guerrillas operating Freelingin Maryland I ment more so that they were from Maryland most of there raids were in nearby Loudoun county Virginia and the Shenandoah but they also operated in Maryland gilmor went as far north as holding westminster Maryland for ransom but it is believed the mayor and him found common ground over a bottle of whiskey yo be honest I cannot find a concrete number of yankee kentuckians anywhere from 75k to 125k
Freeling quoted 25k men from Kentucky enlisted in the Union Army. We can add Kentucky Homeguards to that number. In my thread "Union vs CSA guerrillas" I cited Unionist guerrillas from Kentucky that killed straglers and wounded troops from Braggs failed invasion of Kentucky and followed them into Tennessee.
Leftyhunter
 
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Freeling quoted 25k men from Kentucky enlisted in the Union Army. We can add Kentucky Homeguards to that number. In my thread "Union vs CSA guerrillas" I cited Unionist guerrillas from Kentucky that killed straglers and wounded troops from Braggs failed invasion of Kentucky and followed them into Tennessee.
Leftyhunter
The common union number of between 50k and 60k for maryland includes soldiers in colored regiments as well like maryland that factor would also add to kentuckys union ranks substantially
 
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The common union number of between 50k and 60k for maryland includes soldiers in colored regiments as well like maryland that factor would also add to kentuckys union ranks substantially
From what Freeling wrote it appears that he only counted white men from Kentucky to get to the 25k number.
Overall while Maryland may not of been the most enthusiastic Union state it was loyal enough for Union purposes i.e. no need for Union counterinsurgency troops.
Leftyhunter
 
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From what Freeling wrote it appears that he only counted white men from Kentucky to get to the 25k number.
Overall while Maryland may not of been the most enthusiastic Union state it was loyal enough for Union purposes i.e. no need for Union counterinsurgency troops.
Leftyhunter
Hard to say the heavy number of troops occupying the state may have been a factor that and most of confederate maryland operations had moved out of state I do know just my own research there where two men from westminster who rode with mosby and another two who lived in carroll county who rode with Mcneil it's a small sample size i know but there were native Maryland's in guerilla operations just not under a maryland flag
 

BlueandGrayl

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By the 1860s, Maryland had become less reliant on the South being the center of black life in North America and was really more of a mixed bag (it had Northern and Southern aspects) even as a state forming the Mason-Dixon Line. On the hand Kentucky and Missouri still had a lot of ties (politically, culturally, and economically) to the South I already had noted that one editor from Louisville stated that it was "Southern" in terms of "prejudices, feelings, and interests" there's also Missouri primarily an agricultural region (like other Southern states, albeit a bit more diversified) it was home to the "Little Dixie" region with plantations galore, the fact that many of its native born population (outside of the Irish and German populations) were from the Upper South states of Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky (the former two had seceded from the Union and joined the Confederacy) (not counting Western Northern inhabitants from Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio), the "Border Ruffians" of Bleeding Kansas and being the site of the infamous Dred Scott decision as well as the St. Louis riots which involved pro-Confederate secessionist Missourians fighting the Union Army and Germans.
 
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By the 1860s, Maryland had become less reliant on the South being the center of black life in North America and was really more of a mixed bag (it had Northern and Southern aspects) even as a state forming the Mason-Dixon Line. On the hand Kentucky and Missouri still had a lot of ties (politically, culturally, and economically) to the South I already had noted that one editor from Louisville stated that it was "Southern" in terms of "prejudices, feelings, and interests" there's also Missouri primarily an agricultural region (like other Southern states, albeit a bit more diversified) it was home to the "Little Dixie" region with plantations galore, the fact that many of its native born population (outside of the Irish and German populations) were from the Upper South states of Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky (the former two had seceded from the Union and joined the Confederacy) (not counting Western Northern inhabitants from Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio), the "Border Ruffians" of Bleeding Kansas and being the site of the infamous Dred Scott decision as well as the St. Louis riots which involved pro-Confederate secessionist Missourians fighting the Union Army and Germans.
I give up
 
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The American Party was generally anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic, and anti-Irish. However, in the south, including Maryland, it was mostly a continuation of the Whigs. It was less pro-slavery and secessionist than the Democrats. The Maryland American Party US Senator was named Kennedy and half Irish. There were also English Catholic American Party officials in Maryland and French / Spanish Catholic American Party officials in Louisiana and the Gulf coast area.

As posters have mentioned, parts of Maryland had a large slave population, spoke with a sort of southern accent, and were strongly secessionist. Many northern and western counties had almost no slaves and were strongly Unionist.

There wasn't a Confederate Maryland government or much guerilla activity because it was strongly controlled by Union forces defending the federal capital. There were many arrests, and 1/3 of the state legislature was imprisoned. There probably weren't the votes to secede anyway, but Lincoln did not take any chances.
 

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