Did Lincoln Abhor Slavery? (poll)

Did Lincoln Abhor Slavery?

  • Yes

    Votes: 39 62.9%
  • No

    Votes: 20 32.3%
  • Don't Know

    Votes: 3 4.8%

  • Total voters
    62

gem

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 26, 2012
He said, "If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong."

He also said the following:
Lincoln Douglas 4 th debate

http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/the-lincoln-douglas-debates-4th-debate-part-i/

"I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races, [applause]—that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race."
 

Kirk

Private
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Lincoln was a firm supporter of slavery, and said so often. And it must be remembered that as an attorney in 1847, he represented a slave-owner in his efforts to recover escaped slave property. And of course, he married into a slave-owning family. And no doubt he wore shirts made from slave-produced cotton, smoked cigars made of slave-produced tobacco, ate slave-produced rice, and drank slave-produced coffee with slave-produced sugar. Combine all this with Lincoln's extreme white-supremacy, and one must conclude that Lincoln was a very strong supporter of slavery indeed.
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Right here.
He also said the following:
Lincoln Douglas 4 th debate

http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/the-lincoln-douglas-debates-4th-debate-part-i/

"I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races, [applause]—that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race."

That's not slavery.
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Location
Central Florida
Lincoln did not abhor slavery. He falls into the group that believes slavery made our Democracy look hypocritical for slavery ran against the values and principles laid out in our Declaration of Independence and Constitution. There was no morality in Lincoln's thoughts on slavery only philosophical ones...
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Right here.
Lincoln was only against the expansion of slavery. He was ok with slavery where it already existed, he said so himself.

Lincoln was against slavery everywhere. He recognized the Federal government had no authority over slavery in the states where it existed--and only in the states where it existed. When it existed on federal property such as installations and ships, he didn't make any promises. Additionally, he proposed ending slavery in the District of Columbia. The reason he wanted to cut off its expansion was he believed it would eventually die out if that was done while staying within the law.
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Right here.
Lincoln did not abhor slavery. He falls into the group that believes slavery made our Democracy look hypocritical for slavery ran against the values and principles laid out in our Declaration of Independence and Constitution. There was no morality in Lincoln's thoughts on slavery only philosophical ones...

That's wrong. Lincoln was morally opposed to slavery and said so.
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
1. Confiscation Acts
2. Emancipation Proclamation
3.Recruiting black troops
4.hanging slave ship captain
5.Meeting with African American leaders in the White House, the first time in history, the last time before Theodore Roosevelt.
6.Outlawing slavery in DC
7.Pushing for emancipation in loyal states
8.13th Amendment

People can be critical about how fast Lincoln moved. If they had been there, everything would have been wrapped up in two weeks!
21st century people might wag their fingers at Lincoln's racial attitudes. He was moderate compared to Thad Stevens or Frederick Douglass. But compared to his Northern Democrats opponents and the Confederates, he sounds like Malcolm X.
 

wbull1

First Sergeant
Official Vendor
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Lincoln defended a slaveholder in one case but it was not the only case involving slavery he was involved in
Another case involving slavery shows Lincoln’s kind heart. An old slave woman living near Springfield had been born into slavery in Kentucky. A man named Hinkle acquired the woman and her children. He moved into Illinois, bringing the woman and her children with her. Knowing he could not hold them in slavery, he gave them their freedom.

A son of the woman took a job as a waiter on the steamboat plying the Mississippi. At New Orleans the young man went ashore, forgetting or not knowing he was likely to be arrested. The city had a law requiring any African American found on the streets after sundown had to have a written pass from his or her owner or they would be jailed. The young man was arrested and incarcerated. After some time he was put on trial, found guilty and sentenced to pay a fine.

The steamboat had left without him. Lacking money, the young man was at risk of being sold as a slave to pay the fine. His distraught mother came to Lincoln for help, because of his reputation as one of the few attorneys who would take a case involving the rights of enslaved people. With his partner, William Henry Herndon, Lincoln spoke with the Governor of Illinois. He said he could do nothing about the matter.

The two lawyers sent their own money to New Orleans. The fine was paid and the young man returned safely to his grateful mother.

In 1841 Lincoln was involved in Bailey v Cromwell which helped define rules in Illinois regarding slavery. Cromwell sold an indentured or enslaved African American young woman named Nancy to Bailey. He took a promissory note in payment. The note came due, but it was not paid. Cromwell then sued Bailey in the Tazewell County court. The plaintiff, Cromwell, got a judgment in his favor for $431.97.

However, Bailey appealed the case to the Illinois Supreme Court. Lincoln represented Bailey. He was opposed by Stephen T. Logan, who would soon become the senior partner in a joint legal practice with Lincoln. The future President argued that Nancy could not be held in slavery because under the Ordinance of 1787 the Northwest Territory, which had included what subsequently became the state of Illinois, slavery was prohibited. He noted that the Constitution of the state of Illinois also explicitly disallowed slavery. Lincoln argued that Nancy was a free person due to her residence in the free state of Illinois. As a free person, she could not be sold. The promissory note was illegal.

The Supreme Court agreed with Lincoln and reversed the lower court. The decision supported the broad principle that in Illinois the presumption of the law was that every person was free without regard to color.

As to his remarks during the Lincoln-Douglas debates, you only have to read what Stephen A. Douglas said to see how progressive Lincoln was in terms of his view of slaves compared to others. Douglas was not nearly as vicious as others in his statements.

His in-laws owned slaves. He smoked cigars and wore shirts. That means he supported slavery? Really?
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Right here.
Lincoln defended a slaveholder in one case but it was not the only case involving slavery he was involved in
Another case involving slavery shows Lincoln’s kind heart. An old slave woman living near Springfield had been born into slavery in Kentucky. A man named Hinkle acquired the woman and her children. He moved into Illinois, bringing the woman and her children with her. Knowing he could not hold them in slavery, he gave them their freedom.

A son of the woman took a job as a waiter on the steamboat plying the Mississippi. At New Orleans the young man went ashore, forgetting or not knowing he was likely to be arrested. The city had a law requiring any African American found on the streets after sundown had to have a written pass from his or her owner or they would be jailed. The young man was arrested and incarcerated. After some time he was put on trial, found guilty and sentenced to pay a fine.

The steamboat had left without him. Lacking money, the young man was at risk of being sold as a slave to pay the fine. His distraught mother came to Lincoln for help, because of his reputation as one of the few attorneys who would take a case involving the rights of enslaved people. With his partner, William Henry Herndon, Lincoln spoke with the Governor of Illinois. He said he could do nothing about the matter.

The two lawyers sent their own money to New Orleans. The fine was paid and the young man returned safely to his grateful mother.

In 1841 Lincoln was involved in Bailey v Cromwell which helped define rules in Illinois regarding slavery. Cromwell sold an indentured or enslaved African American young woman named Nancy to Bailey. He took a promissory note in payment. The note came due, but it was not paid. Cromwell then sued Bailey in the Tazewell County court. The plaintiff, Cromwell, got a judgment in his favor for $431.97.

However, Bailey appealed the case to the Illinois Supreme Court. Lincoln represented Bailey. He was opposed by Stephen T. Logan, who would soon become the senior partner in a joint legal practice with Lincoln. The future President argued that Nancy could not be held in slavery because under the Ordinance of 1787 the Northwest Territory, which had included what subsequently became the state of Illinois, slavery was prohibited. He noted that the Constitution of the state of Illinois also explicitly disallowed slavery. Lincoln argued that Nancy was a free person due to her residence in the free state of Illinois. As a free person, she could not be sold. The promissory note was illegal.

The Supreme Court agreed with Lincoln and reversed the lower court. The decision supported the broad principle that in Illinois the presumption of the law was that every person was free without regard to color.

As to his remarks during the Lincoln-Douglas debates, you only have to read what Stephen A. Douglas said to see how progressive Lincoln was in terms of his view of slaves compared to others. Douglas was not nearly as vicious as others in his statements.

His in-laws owned slaves. He smoked cigars and wore shirts. That means he supported slavery? Really?

I don't even think he smoked cigars.
 

Kirk

Private
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Lincoln defended a slaveholder in one case but it was not the only case involving slavery he was involved in
Another case involving slavery shows Lincoln’s kind heart. An old slave woman living near Springfield had been born into slavery in Kentucky. A man named Hinkle acquired the woman and her children. He moved into Illinois, bringing the woman and her children with her. Knowing he could not hold them in slavery, he gave them their freedom.

A son of the woman took a job as a waiter on the steamboat plying the Mississippi. At New Orleans the young man went ashore, forgetting or not knowing he was likely to be arrested. The city had a law requiring any African American found on the streets after sundown had to have a written pass from his or her owner or they would be jailed. The young man was arrested and incarcerated. After some time he was put on trial, found guilty and sentenced to pay a fine.

The steamboat had left without him. Lacking money, the young man was at risk of being sold as a slave to pay the fine. His distraught mother came to Lincoln for help, because of his reputation as one of the few attorneys who would take a case involving the rights of enslaved people. With his partner, William Henry Herndon, Lincoln spoke with the Governor of Illinois. He said he could do nothing about the matter.

The two lawyers sent their own money to New Orleans. The fine was paid and the young man returned safely to his grateful mother.

In 1841 Lincoln was involved in Bailey v Cromwell which helped define rules in Illinois regarding slavery. Cromwell sold an indentured or enslaved African American young woman named Nancy to Bailey. He took a promissory note in payment. The note came due, but it was not paid. Cromwell then sued Bailey in the Tazewell County court. The plaintiff, Cromwell, got a judgment in his favor for $431.97.

However, Bailey appealed the case to the Illinois Supreme Court. Lincoln represented Bailey. He was opposed by Stephen T. Logan, who would soon become the senior partner in a joint legal practice with Lincoln. The future President argued that Nancy could not be held in slavery because under the Ordinance of 1787 the Northwest Territory, which had included what subsequently became the state of Illinois, slavery was prohibited. He noted that the Constitution of the state of Illinois also explicitly disallowed slavery. Lincoln argued that Nancy was a free person due to her residence in the free state of Illinois. As a free person, she could not be sold. The promissory note was illegal.

The Supreme Court agreed with Lincoln and reversed the lower court. The decision supported the broad principle that in Illinois the presumption of the law was that every person was free without regard to color.

As to his remarks during the Lincoln-Douglas debates, you only have to read what Stephen A. Douglas said to see how progressive Lincoln was in terms of his view of slaves compared to others. Douglas was not nearly as vicious as others in his statements.

His in-laws owned slaves. He smoked cigars and wore shirts. That means he supported slavery? Really?

Oddly, you didn't post anything relative to Lincoln's support for the Fugitive Slave Law. In fairness to you, however, maybe it's only because you are unfamiliar with exactly how Lincoln described that law. So, to clear up any confusion, Lincoln described the Fugitive Slave law as "running and catching ni**ers". Then he pledged his support for it. So please, enough of Lincoln as some sort of harmless, avuncular, cherub. He was a crude, crass, ruthless, white-supremacist.

PS- "Slave-produced" cigars and "slave-produced" cotton shirts. Why did you leave out the "slave-produced"? If it's so meaningless, why didn't you write "slave-produced shirts" and "slave-produced" cigars?

PPS- You also forgot to mention that the Constitution of Illinois also specifically disallowed blacks.
 
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