Diary Entry on Sherman’s March, Concern for Sons

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Stiles/Akin

Sergeant Major
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
2,146
Location
Atlanta, Georgia
THE LATE UNPLEASANTNESS

December 18, 1864
Diary Entry on Sherman’s March, Concern for Sons
A Columbus man wrote in his diary of Sherman’s advance through Georgia, and was worried about three of his sons with the Confederate defenders in Savannah. He had already lost three others sons in the Atlanta Campaign.

“Sherman’s army passed on via Sandersville and to Waynesboro, Burke County, skirmishing all the way without any important fight. A branch of his force turned to the west and reached Thomasville near the Florida line, and thence on to Savannah, where they now are, from the reports that reach us. “George, Sims and Gilmer are at Savannah. Had no letters from them for some days. Reports say Sherman has surrounded Savannah. This is a day of great anxiety with us. Our forces, or a part of them, have crossed the Savannah river and had a fight at Grayhamville, some miles from Savannah in South Carolina. The result seems to be uncertain. We are daily looking for a decisive battle at Savannah. “Provisions still going higher and higher. Corn, $10 per bushel, wheat, $40, pork, gross, $24. Cotton, 75 to 80 cents.” Source: John Banks, Autobiography of John Banks, 1797 - 1870 (Austell, Ga.: privately printed by Elberta Leonard, 1936), p. 35.

December 18, 1864
Captured Georgia Soldier Doing Well, Worried about Wife
A Georgia soldier wounded and captured in the Gettysburg campaign wrote home to his wife, telling her he was doing well, although worried about her.

“…The anniversary of my arrival at Johnson’s Island has just passed. I am cheerful and hopeful. Providence is kind. Do not be uneasy about me. Exchange will come by and by. Meantime I employ my time in regularly reading books of law or history and miscellanies germane to my profession, besides current newspapers. My room is pleasant and my companions are agreeable. I have been very uneasy about you. That God may preserve you and others in Monroe from harm is my earnest prayer! Kind remembrances to all. Cherishing above all things your memory…” Source: Anita B. Sams (ed.), With Unabated Trust: Major Henry McDaniel’s Love Letters from Confederate Battlefields as Treasured in Hester McDaniel’s Bonnet Box (The Historical Society of Walton County, Inc., 1977), p. 210.

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civilken

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 25, 2013
Messages
3,518
I can not imagine the hell family members went through waiting to hear from their sons and husbands etc. we have to remember this was a time that if you lost your husband you probably lost your home and without a home you probably had to give your children a way it happened a lot. Families were split up left and right..
 
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