Details on the death of your Civil War ancestor.

Joined
Aug 2, 2019
It does appear we have many forum members who are also genealogists.
That's how I started out. My family didn't come to America until about 50 years after the Civil War, but one day I was reading a Civil War diary from Andersonville where the writer left a blank where the names of the six raiders should have been. I went look up the names to fill in the blank mentally and discovered that there were 7 names for 6 men who were hanged, and off I went! By the time I solved it (one of the guys was using an alias), I had enough information for a book and a relatively unique skills set, that I mostly only get to use here and when I'm writing.
 

Dave D

Private
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
A cousin of my great grandfather, Joseph H. Pickle, was a member of Company D of the 50th VA and was the regimental flag bearer; he is mentioned by name in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies for his gallantry at Chancellorsville [O.R., Vol XXV, Part I, page 1030, report # 409].

Pickle was killed at the Wilderness during the initial actions of the battle on 5 May 1864 and the 50th VA's battle flag was captured by members of the 7th Indiana Infantry. Although Pvt John Opel of the 7th Indiana was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the capture of the flag of the 50th Virginia, there was some contention from fellow soldiers as to who actually overwhelmed the flag bearer Pickle and took the flag that day. From the regimental history of the 7th Indiana Infantry ("Narrative of the service of the Seventh Indiana Infantry in the war for the Union” By Orville Thomson, 1910):

The statement of Private Thomas M. Mozingo, Co. E, 7th Indiana (page 185) :

7thInd_Orville_Thomson185.jpg
 
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Fritz1255

Private
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
My ancestor was also wounded at Gettysburg, severely per his records, but I was never able to determine the nature of his wound. He returns to the army in time to get captured in June of 1864.

I would love to know the nature of his wound there also but no luck in that quest either.

For someone in the family to know about the sacrifices he made for his country is important to me.

John
Assuming he was on the Union side and survived the war, he would have almost certainly filed for a disability pension. If you can get his pension records (there are services that will do this for you at a reasonable cost), there will be more detail that you ever wanted to see.
 

Cavalier

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
@Fritz1255 Thanks a lot for your comments. I appreciate any help I can get. He never married or had children and died a pow in 1864 so no pension records I am told. I have received a lot of help thanks to this site, for which I am very grateful.

I have his photograph and I am thankful for that. He was in the Wall of Faces at the old Gettysburg visitor center. He may end up on the current one yet. I hope so.

Thank you again for your interest.

John
 

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
@Fritz1255 Thanks a lot for your comments. I appreciate any help I can get. He never married or had children and died a pow in 1864 so no pension records I am told.
In the absence of a widow or children, a parent frequently received a pension.

In Maine, if a soldier was under age, a parent "signed off" on the enlistment--and this may be true elsewhere. There's a start to his background.

Even if he died, it is still worthwhile checking the 1890 vets census. It wasn't unheard of for a survivor to fill in an entry (and remember that the bottom of the page contained information about wounds and disease).
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Would you want to know the details of you ancestor"s death if they were killed in combat? How detailed would you want the details? For me knowing the battle would be enough. I would not want to know if they died from a gunshot or a cannon. I will admit my direct ancestor died of an illness and perhaps if they had died in combat I would be of a different view.
 
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Location
Wisconsin
If you could would you like to have the details on how you Civil War ancestor was killed/died uring the Civil War? It might be interesting but sad. Is it just enough to know where and when they died?

My ancestor served in the 4th WI Infantry/Cavalry and was Court Martialed in March, 1864 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Other information such as battles I am still researching. Thank Bob Velke for the research I have found so far.
 

Arnie Slater

Private
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
I'm a newbie, but yes! My Ancestor was Peleg Nelson Tolley of the 58th Massachusetts infantry Company G. There is some question as to where he actually died. He is listed in at least two books from 1865 as a casualty of disease at Andersonville. He was wounded and taken Prisoner July 30th at "the Crater".... However, there is a headstone that bears his name and Regiment in Danville Virginia. His death is noted as November 5th 1864....so there are questions as to where he actually is....or how he got there.
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
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Mar 15, 2013
I'm a newbie, but yes! My Ancestor was Peleg Nelson Tolley of the 58th Massachusetts infantry Company G. There is some question as to where he actually died. He is listed in at least two books from 1865 as a casualty of disease at Andersonville. He was wounded and taken Prisoner July 30th at "the Crater".... However, there is a headstone that bears his name and Regiment in Danville Virginia. His death is noted as November 5th 1864....so there are questions as to where he actually is....or how he got there.
Hello Arnie and welcome to CivilWarTalk. Happy to have you aboard! If anyone will know whether your ancestor was imprisoned at Andersonville it's @Gary Morgan She should see this post now that I tagged her and be along shortly to let you know of Tolley has any records at Andersonville.
 
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