Descendants Make The Charge

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Kristen Hope

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This photo was taken near the North Carolina monument in Gettysburg in July 2017. Their 4th great uncle participated in Pickett’s Charge with the 47th North Carolina. His name was Corporal Rufus Pullen. Rufus’s brother, their 4th great grandfather Emelius, “went out sick” on July 1st. Rufus received a gunshot wound to the hip during the charge. He subsequently made it back to his lines. Following the battle, both Rufus and his brother were left behind in Gettysburg and captured.

Both brothers were imprisoned at Point Lookout, then released a few months later. They returned to their unit. Both were captured AGAIN (at Petersburg), and returned to their “accommodations” in Maryland. Emelius was paroled. Rufus, was not. He died and was buried at Point Lookout in June of 1865 leaving behind a wife and two young children. Census records indicate that Emelius and his family took in his brother’s widow and children.

When we teach history, we teach life. And Gettysburg, though famous for death is full of life!
 
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Tom Elmore

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At Gettysburg, a handful of able-bodied soldiers from every regiment were typically left behind to care for the wounded from their own regiment. Thus it was not uncommon for a well brother to request to stay behind to tend to his wounded brother(s) (and others from the regiment). This type of request seems to have been often granted. The fact that Emelius was captured on July 5 indicates that he was posted at a Confederate field hospital, presumably where Rufus was taken. Of course, many of the Confederate wounded from the July 3 charge fell within Federal lines and were taken to a Federal field hospital, and in that instance any unhurt brother who was also captured at the same time would not have been allowed to remain with his wounded sibling.
 
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Kristen Hope

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At Gettysburg, a handful of able-bodied soldiers from every regiment were typically left behind to care for the wounded from their own regiment. Thus it was not uncommon for a well brother to request to stay behind to tend to his wounded brother(s) (and others from the regiment). This type of request seems to have been often granted. The fact that Emelius was captured on July 5 indicates that he was posted at a Confederate field hospital, presumably where Rufus was taken. Of course, many of the Confederate wounded from the July 3 charge fell within Federal lines and were taken to a Federal field hospital, and in that instance any unhurt brother who was also captured at the same time would not have been allowed to remain with his wounded sibling.
Thanks for your input! I was wondering if Emelius was well enough to leave but stayed for his brother. We’re lucky to have the information that we do but often times it leads to more questions!
 
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View attachment 173544 This photo was taken near the North Carolina monument in Gettysburg in July 2017. Their 4th great uncle participated in Pickett’s Charge with the 47th North Carolina. His name was Corporal Rufus Pullen. Rufus’s brother, their 4th great grandfather Emelius, “went out sick” on July 1st. Rufus received a gunshot wound to the hip during the charge. He subsequently made it back to his lines. Following the battle, both Rufus and his brother were left behind in Gettysburg and captured.

Both brothers were imprisoned at Point Lookout, then released a few months later. They returned to their unit. Both were captured AGAIN (at Petersburg), and returned to their “accommodations” in Maryland. Emelius was paroled. Rufus, was not. He died and was buried at Point Lookout in June of 1865 leaving behind a wife and two young children. Census records indicate that Emelius and his family took in his brother’s widow and children.

When we teach history, we teach life. And Gettysburg, though famous for death is full of life!
Welcome. I have several western NC Confederates in my family tree. A few of them were at Gettysburg. That's a great photo!

You may already have this link :

http://www.archive.org/stream/historiesofsever03clar#page/n113/mode/2up
 
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Barend

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Are you allowed to walk freely on the grounds? I have not been to any battlefield. I hope to go to Gettysburg sometime.
 
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Deleted User CS

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Welcome from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. I love the picture. You should have it put in the forum's picture contest. I would certainly nominate it. David.
 
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