Dates of southern states readmitted to the U.S. and local rule reestablished

Bonny Blue Flag

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#1
South Carolina:
-Seceded: Dec. 20, 1860
-Admitted into C.S.: Feb. 4, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: July 9, 1868
-Local rule reestablished: Nov. 28, 1876

Mississippi:
-Seceded: Jan. 9, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: Feb. 4, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: Beg. 23, 1870
-Local rule reestablished: Jan. 4, 1876

Florida:
-Seceded: Jan 10, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: Feb. 4, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: June 25, 1868
-Local rule reestablished: Jan 2, 1877

Alabama:
-Seceded: Jan. 11, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: Feb. 4, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: July 14, 1868
-Local rule reestablished: Nov. 16, 1874

Georgia:
-Seceded: Jan. 19, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: Feb 4, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: July 15, 1870
-Local rule reestablished: Nov. 1, 1871

Louisiana:
-Seceded Jan. 26, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: Feb. 4, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: June 25, 1868 or July 9, 1868
-Local rule reestablished: Jan. 2, 1877

Texas:
-Seceded: Feb. 1, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: Mar. 2, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: Mar. 30, 1870
-Local rule reestablished: Jan. 14, 1873

Virginia:
-Seceded: April 17, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: May 7, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: Jan. 26, 1870
-Local rule reestablished: Oct. 5, 1869

Arkansas:
-Seceded: May 6, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: May 18, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: June 22, 1868
-Local rule reestablished: Nov. 10, 1874

Tennessee:
-Seceded: May 6, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: May 16, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: July 24, 1866
-Local rule reestablished: Oct. 4, 1869

North Carolina:
-Seceded: May 21, 1861
-Admitted into C.S.: May 16, 1861
-Readmitted into U.S.: July 4, 1868
-Local rule reestablished Nov. 28, 1876

Source: wordIQ.com/definition/Confederate_States_of_America

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Interesting the differences in when states were readmitted into the Union.

I wonder what constituted the reestablishment of local rule?
 

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judi

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#2
My guess is that N. Carolina was the last one readmitted because they were the first to go out. Government may have wanted to punish them. Like I said that is just an opinion and don't know for sure.
 

Glorybound

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#3
Interesting thread Bonnie Blue. I never knew that the former Confederate states had to be officially "readmitted" to the Union. I guess I thought that the official US position was that secession was illegal and unrecognized by the US and that these former Confederate states never officially or otherwise legally left the Union. But obviously I was incorrect on that because their "readmission" dates are published and in black and white. Thanks for the info, again I've learned something new on these here boards!
 

brass napoleon

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#4
Interesting thread Bonnie Blue. I never knew that the former Confederate states had to be officially "readmitted" to the Union. I guess I thought that the official US position was that secession was illegal and unrecognized by the US and that these former Confederate states never officially or otherwise legally left the Union. But obviously I was incorrect on that because their "readmission" dates are published and in black and white. Thanks for the info, again I've learned something new on these here boards!
I think that might just be a case of imprecise wording. It was my impression that the states weren't readmitted to the Union, their representatives were readmitted to Congress. But I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong. :laugh1:
 

Nathanb1

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#5
At least part of that was the military presence. State elections weren't held until Nov. 1873, either, in Texas.
I can't find a source that directly lists the date you have of Jan. 14th, 1873, but several mention Democrats' regaining control of state government as the return of local rule. I'd love to know if anyone has something more specific. There are several good articles, in the Texas State Library online and Handbook of Texas online, as well as others.
 

Freddy

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#6
Confederate States were not readmitted to the Union. They never left the Union. However, they did withdraw their representatives from Congress. Their representatives were allowed to be seated only after the states had new state governments/constitutions and ratified the Fourteenth Amendment. A state out of the Union cannot ratify an amendment.
 

Stonewall1982

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#7
My guess is that N. Carolina was the last one readmitted because they were the first to go out. Government may have wanted to punish them. Like I said that is just an opinion and don't know for sure.

South Carolina was the first to withdraw their representatives. It was the only state to secede in 1860. All of the others were in 1861
 

ole

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#8
That's about it. The states were never out. Readmission was when the House and Senate decided to let the state's senators and representatives have a seat. A state can elect anyone they please, but the senate or house has to allow the rep or senator to sit in.
 

Stonewall1982

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#9
Local rule probably meant when military governors where no longer used and martial law was ended. Also at that time the elections were organized and the people could elect a governor for themselves. Interesting though that while local rule was established earlier than 1877, federal troops were not pulled out until Hayes' took office in 1877.
 

Freddy

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#11
Here is the Act signed by Grant readmitting Texas' representatives to Congress.

Chap. XXXIX -
An Act to admit the State of Texas to Representation in the Congress of the United States.
March 30, 1870


"Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the said State of Texas is entitled to representation in the Congress of the United States:"

http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/ref/abouttx/secession/30march1870.html
 
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#12
Local rule probably meant when military governors where no longer used and martial law was ended. Also at that time the elections were organized and the people could elect a governor for themselves. Interesting though that while local rule was established earlier than 1877, federal troops were not pulled out until Hayes' took office in 1877.
I thought they left the Union to establish local rule! GRIN I do like your definition.
 

larry_cockerham

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#14
Local rule probably meant when military governors where no longer used and martial law was ended. Also at that time the elections were organized and the people could elect a governor for themselves. Interesting though that while local rule was established earlier than 1877, federal troops were not pulled out until Hayes' took office in 1877.
That's the year Bedford Forrest died. I guess the war was over.
 
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#15
I have an interesting document from my gggrandfather's things which bears on this thread.
It is a two-sided doc; one side a voter registration titled United States of America, State of Louisiana --- Register's Office --- City of New Orleans. It was signed by him as the 919th elector on the Registry of the District, signed Sept. 30, 1868. There is a note on the paper that he voted Nov. 3, 1868.

On the other side is a doc (Form No. 3 Oath to be taken by those who have aided Reconstruction). It is also dated Sept. 30, 1868, and reads I William O. do solemnly swear, or affirm, that I am twenty-one years of age, was born in the U.S., and am subject to the jusridiction thereof, and have been a resident of the State of Louisiana since the 1st day of Sept 1867, and a resident of this Parish since the 1st day of Sept 1867, and that I am not disfranchised for any of the causes stated in the first paragraph of Article Ninety-nine of the Constitution of this State.

And I do further solemnly swear or affirm, that prior to the first of January, eighteen hundred and sixty-eight, I favored the execution of the laws of the United States, popularly known as the Reconstruction Acts of Congress, and openly and actively assisted the loyal men of the State in their efforts to restore Louisiana to her position in the Union. Signed William O., Sept. 30, 1868.


This was obviously a loyalty oath that had to be signed before becoming enfranchised. Its wording suggests to me that after the War Louisiana was not part of the Union and wasn't restored to that position until 1868.

Also, he was a Confederate infantry captain who had lived in the northern part of the state for almost 20 years, not just since Sept. '67. Did the clock start over for citizens of Louisiana on that date?
 

Freddy

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#16
No, the Confederate States never left the Union. The document refers to "the State of Louisiana". "To her position in the Union" means the state's representatives are allowed to sit in Congress. Congress refused to allow the representatives of the former Confederate states their seats in Congress under Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction Plan. They did not say they were not states in the Union.
 
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#17
No, the Confederate States never left the Union. The document refers to "the State of Louisiana". "To her position in the Union" means the state's representatives are allowed to sit in Congress. Congress refused to allow the representatives of the former Confederate states their seats in Congress under Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction Plan. They did not say they were not states in the Union.
Sounds like a difference without a distinction to me.
 

Freddy

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#18
Sounds like a difference without a distinction to me.
There is a great distinction. First, did you read the link I posted to the actual legislation passed by Congress to allow Texas' representatives to take their seats in Congress? It did not say Texas became a state again because Texas was already a state. Former Confederate states had no representation in Congress until Congress seated their representatives. Which Congress did for each former Confederate state. You will not find any legislation admitting those states back into the Union because they were states already. That is the distinction.
 

Nathanb1

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#20
It was the Ironclad Oath.....definition from civilwarhome.com:

Ironclad Oath - The Ironclad Oath originated in a stringent loyalty oath passed by the Federal Congress July 2, 1862. Largely because of President Abraham Lincoln's conciliatory approach toward reconstructing the Confederate states and citizens, the oath had little effect during the war despite the heated debate it prompted in Congress. The oath as written into the Reconstruction Act of March 23, 1867 called for allegiance to the U.S. government. While earlier loyalty oaths included only a pledge of future loyalty, Radical congressmen insisted on a pledge of past as well as future allegiance.
 

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