Dare I sing?

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
So, just thinking about “Taps”. And Buglers from another thread..There are words,to the tune, and as a vocalist my brain automagically wants to open my mouth and let forth...(I usually sing without a microphone. I have a “carrying voice”, but I can sing softly)...If I sang for all surrounding to hear, at the end of a battle, Would people be censorous or generous??

BTW at Hale in 2019 we had a Bugler who, at 12 noon, played the Star Spangled Banner. I was at the Suttlers tent, but stepped outside to sing. For me, it was a very emotional moment and I was in no way performing, just singing along. Not many side looks, but most just standing and not joining in. Wish they would. I did get some compliments, which was nice. There was a fellow (Union) who then sat and sang, “The Vacant Chair”. Nice voice, and I would have joined him, but figured it was his gig.

So, Dare I Sing Taps?
 

7thWisconsin

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 21, 2014
Just remember that the ¨Day is Done¨ lyrics that most of us know are significantly postwar, although authorship is debated. The soldier lyrics during the war are a lot less touching: ¨Put out the lights/go to sleeeeeeeep/go to sleep/go to sleep/go to sleep. Put out the liiiiiights/go to sleep/go to sleeeeeeeeeeeep.¨ (The long words are the notes with the fermata.)
 

James Brenner

Corporal
Joined
Nov 10, 2016
Location
North Canton, Ohio
Depends on the situation. It would be appropriate for a remembrance or memorial event, but maybe not so much at a typical reenactment scenario. If you do opt to sing, please heed 7th Wisconsin's advice and remember, too, that to many combat veterans, Taps can bring up some unpleasant memories. In other words, because of the sensitivities involved, it would be best to sing it for a specific reason and not just because the opportunity presents itself. It's your call.

I hope this helps.
 

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
Just remember that the ¨Day is Done¨ lyrics that most of us know are significantly postwar, although authorship is debated. The soldier lyrics during the war are a lot less touching: ¨Put out the lights/go to sleeeeeeeep/go to sleep/go to sleep/go to sleep. Put out the liiiiiights/go to sleep/go to sleeeeeeeeeeeep.¨ (The long words are the notes with the fermata.)
Oh, I have heard many lyrics...I imagine there were many not so polite ones as well!
 

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
Depends on the situation. It would be appropriate for a remembrance or memorial event, but maybe not so much at a typical reenactment scenario. If you do opt to sing, please heed 7th Wisconsin's advice and remember, too, that to many combat veterans, Taps can bring up some unpleasant memories. In other words, because of the sensitivities involved, it would be best to sing it for a specific reason and not just because the opportunity presents itself. It's your call.

I hope this helps.
Well, in my mind, when they play taps at the end of the battle scenario it is a Memorial/Remembrance. And while I know that some combat vets feel very emotional about taps, it’s ok. Maybe if we honored others grief, we’d all be healthier mentally.

In fact, when I sing Amazing Grace, or Ave Maria and someone tells me it made them cry, I always tell them, me too. I feel honored that this simple thing that I can do, can touch other people.
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
You have a wonderful voice and you surely did justice to this piece! The lack of background music certainly adds to the solemnity so beautifully conveyed.
 

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
You have a wonderful voice and you surely did justice to this piece! The lack of background music certainly adds to the solemnity so beautifully conveyed.
Thank you. My specialty is singing without instrumentation. I do not have perfect pitch, but I have good pitch..as in if I can hear it in my head I can sing it.

And this piece has morphed from a “go to sleep” to a more solemn idea of eternal sleep. I can sing it without choking up, but not Danny Boy and sometimes not the Anthem either.
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Thank you. My specialty is singing without instrumentation. I do not have perfect pitch, but I have good pitch..as in if I can hear it in my head I can sing it.

And this piece has morphed from a “go to sleep” to a more solemn idea of eternal sleep. I can sing it without choking up, but not Danny Boy and sometimes not the Anthem either.
When I sing, it's the listeners who cry! ☹️
 
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