Period Cutting remarks: Grandma and Grampa’s favorite kitchen knife stories and care.

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Mrs. V

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It was suggested that a thread on old and trusted blades be started. Let me tell you about one of the knives I got from my Grandparents. First I will tell you that they threw nothing away, so I have no idea how old the knife I have is. I can tell you it has a cream handle on it, made of some odd material, the blade is thin and quite flexable..maybe 4-5 inches long. When I took it to be sharpened the fellow looked at me like, “really” this old thing..yeah, once he had it sharpened his tune changed right quick. It holds an edge, is incredibly sharp, and needs a new handle..I hand wash it, and dry with a towel..carefully!

Now, what’s your favorite old knife?
 

7thWisconsin

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My grandfather was a blacksmith by trade, and he made most of the tools used in my dad's household, including the kitchen knives. I have 2 of his knives still. One of them is with my reenacting gear, and I use it every time I go out. It takes a razor sharp edge to this day.
 
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Mrs. V

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My grandfather was a blacksmith by trade, and he made most of the tools used in my dad's household, including the kitchen knives. I have 2 of his knives still. One of them is with my reenacting gear, and I use it every time I go out. It takes a razor sharp edge to this day.
I remember my Grandfather sharpening his knives by hand. Several of his paring knives had very thin blades. I always wondered if they were so thin because they got worn away? He used a whet stone to sharpen btw..
 

donna

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A fancy knife I have is a sterling silver handle cake knife. I have it in a silver storage box that my Mother had. It is very fancy. Have to get it out and see what marks it has.

My Grandfather sharpened all his knives .. He used a whet stone too.
 
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alan polk

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When I was a kid, my dad, brother and I were members of a skeet shooting club called Rio Vista. The club had been started by veterans after World War 2. Between competitions I got to know those veterans. One of them was quite an artisan and gave me these knives he made especially for me. I was about 10 or 11 so I was over the moon when he presented them to me.

The handles are whitetail antlers, the blades made from sawmill saw blades. It’s a unique double decker set up, and I have treasured them ever since.

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Cheswick

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My favorite old knives are ones I've been fortunate enough to find at thrift stores. Every so often I find a blackened blade, usually a paring knife. After cleaning and resharpening (my husband resharpens them for me), I have wonderful carbon steel knives. Those are by far my favorites - I love the edge they hold.
 
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Cheswick

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This thread made me think of the little old knife grinder who used to walk down our block once a summer about 10 years ago. He would wheel his grindstone and ring a bell as he walked. If you wanted a blade sharpened (knives or scissors), he would stop, resharpen your blades - and charge a dollar per blade. I watched for him each summer because he only came once a year. I knew I was seeing something of long ago. He did a marvelous job! I do miss him.
 

Mrs. V

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This thread made me think of the little old knife grinder who used to walk down our block once a summer about 10 years ago. He would wheel his grindstone and ring a bell as he walked. If you wanted a blade sharpened (knives or scissors), he would stop, resharpen your blades - and charge a dollar per blade. I watched for him each summer because he only came once a year. I knew I was seeing something of long ago. He did a marvelous job! I do miss him.
Wow that is really cool! Reminds me of my Father in Law who used to talk about the rag and bone man coming around the neighborhood.
 

Cheswick

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Wow that is really cool! Reminds me of my Father in Law who used to talk about the rag and bone man coming around the neighborhood.
It really did. I live in the suburbs, so not something I ever expected. I could just imagine all those street vendors who came up and down the stree!
 
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lelliott19

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What a great thread @Mrs. V Thanks so much for starting it! My favorite knife is not nearly as nice as the ones you guys have posted. It's not antique or even ancestral, but it has a very strange story. My parents were travelling in England. My younger brother was with them, but my sister and I didnt get to go. We were grown by then, probably in college. Anyway, they stayed at a B&B somewhere and my dad wanted to visit a little cemetery in the village where a distant relative was supposed to be buried. My mother and my brother really weren't interested but they all wound up going anyway. They found the grave and, as they turned to leave the cemetery, my dad found a knife sticking in a tree nearby. It was embedded in the tree. It took him an hour or so to work the knife out, but he was finally able to get it out - and without breaking it.
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You can see how rough the blade is. Anyway, my dad packed it in the luggage and brought it home - from England. Years later, after my dad died, my mother moved in with me and "us kids" chose things we wanted from the house. I chose the knife as one thing I wanted. Im not sure why I wanted it. I'm sure its not valuable or even really old, for that matter. I wasn't even there when my dad found and retrieved it. But its something I cherish because it sort of epitomizes how my dad was....nevermind that my mother and brother didnt want to go to the cemetery in the first place. My dad was going AND he was going to take an extra hour to get that knife out of the tree.:D
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Mutual Hiram Wild Sheffield Stainless Steel England. And there you have it. The knife that was embedded in a tree in a cemetery in England; retrieved by my father in the 1980's; flown across the Atlantic in his luggage; and wound up in a drawer in my kitchen in Alabama.
 
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