Courtesy Post- White Oak Museum July 16 -18, 2010

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M E Wolf

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Courtesy post for the 30th Virginia Infantry (C.S.A.)

I was trying to still get some indications of interest for the event that my other unit is putting on the weekend of July 16-18th at the White Oak Museum in Fredericksburg. Here is the link http://www.whiteoakmuseum.com/. If you know of contact information of the other units could you pass this info to me. -Corporal Gus Koustenis 30th VA Infantry (CSA)

Corporal Gus Koustenis' E-mail address: [email protected]


Union welcomed also!

Living History encampment.


3rd U.S. Infantry Regulars are slated to be there.


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I do have Cpl. Koustenis' cell number if necessary.


M. E. Wolf

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania From November 15, 1862, To January 26, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#4


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
December 7, 1862.
COMMANDING OFFICER VOLUNTEER ENGINEER BRIGADE:
General Burnside desires that no pontoons shall be moved beyond White Oak Church at present, and wishes to know if any have been taken beyond that point down the river; and, if so, how many? It would be well to avoid moving them at all. Please answer by bearer.
C. B. COMSTOCK,
Lieutenant of Engineers and Chief Engineer Army of the Potomac.
-----

White Oak Church is across the street. It was used as a hospital for both sides; a military camp for Union Engineers, etc..
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania From November 15, 1862, To January 26, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#5
HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING,
December 16,.1862.
Maj. Gen. J. G. PARKE, Chief of Staff:
GENERAL: This morning General Burnside indicated a willingness that my command shall take post in the vicinity of White Oak Church. The arrangement was not definitely decided upon, and, in fact, it may be that the general will prefer some other place for the command.
My present position is very uncomfortable for the men, and I think there will be difficulty in supplying them here. So, if you can properly bring the matter to the attention of the general to-morrow morning, and will get a decision of the question, I shall be obliged to you.
Please let me have an answer by the bearer, if possible.
Truly, your friend,
W. B. FRANKLIN,
Major-general.
-----

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
DECEMBER 11-15, 1862.--Battle of Fredericksburg, Va.
No. 20.--Reports of Maj. Ira Spaulding, Fiftieth New York Engineers.
WHITE OAK CHURCH, VA.,
December 12, 1862.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report that, in compliance with your orders, I moved three pontoon bridge trains to the Rappahannock on the night of the 10th instant, and at about 3 o'clock on the morning of the 11th we commenced laying the three bridges at the points designated opposite Fredericksburg: one being located opposite the docks, near the lower end of the town, and two at the rope ferry, about opposite the center of the town. The lower bridge was under the immediate superintendence of Captain McDonald, and the two upper bridges under Captains Brainerd and Ford, respectively.
[end of excerpt]
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Side note: The various re-enactment groups have been very, very thin. The more souls in uniform the better.

I only see the 3rd U.S. Infantry signed up for July 17 & 18 --Confirm with Corpl. Gus Koustenis (Koo-stine-us) the dates, e.g. July 16th (Friday); unless it is a day to set up and coordinate.

M. E. Wolf
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
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Messages
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As of July 13, 2010 --

Friday July 16th, is set up camp and settle in day for companies and individuals walking on independent of companies/organizations. All individuals/companies/groups must bring their own camp gear as to maintain themselves for Friday through Sunday, as well as their military gear.

There are no registration desks, although the Thirtieth (30th) Virginia Infantry (C.S.A.) is the host unit. They will be the 'Go To' unit for any and all guidance, e.g. skirmish schedule and scenarios.

Respectfully submitted,
M. E. Wolf
==============================================================
White Oak Church saw plenty of action and used by the Union Army predominantly.

The location was ideal to approach the Rappahannock River -- Lot of Engineers and artillery units, maintained the position plus many camps.

Battle of Fredericksburg
Mud March
The Chancellorsville Campaign.
Launch of General Reynold's First Corps to Gettysburg began near White Oak Church, June 5, 1863.
Launch of General Sedgwicks' Sixth Corps to Gettysburg began at White Oak Church, June 5, 1863.
Launch of General Newton's Third Corps to Gettysburg began at White Oak Church, June 6, 1863.
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 6.
HEADQUARTERS,
Belle Plain, May 17, 1864.
* * * * * * * * * *
XVIII and XIX. Col. I. C. Bassett and Colonel Dushane [Staunton?] will each send a field officer and 500 men, properly officered, at 8 a.m. May 18, or as soon thereafter as practicable, to the relief of Colonel Dushane, First Maryland Volunteers, White Oak Church. Colonel Dushane will, on being relieved, proceed at once to join the Army of the Potomac.
* * * * * * * * * *
By order of Brig. Gen. J. J. Abercrombie:
R. L. ORR,
Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.
--------------
The Richmond Campaign - August 1-December 31, 1864 - Second Division -August 23.--Ordered to Reams' Station; bivouacked at night at White Oak Church.
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SUTHERLAND'S STATION, April 3, 1865.
Major-General SHERIDAN:
To-morrow General Ord will move forward by the Cox road; Meade by the River road; until after crossing Namozine Creek he will follow the road up the north side of the creek. The Second Corps, now north of the Appomattox, will return to the south side of the Bevill's Bridge. I will follow the Army of the Potomac to-morrow. Ord is on our left flank, without any cavalry to watch it. I wish you would order Mackenzie to meet him to-morrow at White Oak Church, or in that vicinity. Do you hear of any movement on the part of Johnston? I have heard from a variety of sources that he had been ordered up to unite with Lee. If you can get scouts through to Burkeville to ascertain what is there I wish you would do it.
U. S. GRANT,
Lieutenant-General.
------------------------------------------
Balloons at White Oak Church

O.R.--SERIES III--VOLUME III [S# 124]
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS OF THE UNION AUTHORITIES FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1863.(*)--# 12
HEADQUARTERS AERONAUTIC DEPARTMENT,
Near Falmouth, March 13, 1863.
Major-General BUTTERFIELD,
Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:
GENERAL: Between 5 and 6.30 o'clock this morning both balloons ascended, one near White Oak Church and the other about three miles up the river. No movement of the enemy was visible at that time, but all appeared to be quietly in camp, as the smoke ascended from them all. The camp smokes at Bowling Green were distinctly seen, as also one near Scott's Dam, on Golin Run, of considerable size. There is also a camp and quite a number of tents opposite Taylor's Dam. The enemy are still throwing up earth a short distance to-the right of Fredericksburg with embrasures for field pieces.
Since early this morning the weather has been too squally to admit of ascending with the balloon. Every opportunity, however, shall be improved and reports made.
Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
T. S. C. LOWE,
Chief of Aeronautics.
-----------------------------------------
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
March 17, 1863.
Professor LOWE,
Balloon Department:
PROFESSOR: The major-general commanding directs that you make an ascension, if your balloon is in readiness, immediately after dusk, or as soon as rockets with their colors and fires are visible; that you report the color, &c., of rockets--if any can be seen--in a northwesterly or westerly direction. The colors expected are to represent signals as follows:
One signal, green; one signal, green and red; one signal, red and white; one signal, red and green; one signal, white and red. Answering signal from intermediate stations, green. Knowing what signals are expected, you can, perhaps, more readily and surely discern them. Report with care.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
PAUL A. OLIVER,
Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.
------------------------------------------------------------
AMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA., April 12, 1863.
Capt. C. B. COMSTOCK,
Corps of Engineers:
CAPTAIN: Between 5 and 7 o'clock this p.m. I made two ascents with the balloon near White Oak Church, and obtained a very good view of the enemy's camps for a distance of about five miles. Beyond that distance the atmosphere was quite smoky. Along the ridge for a distance of about seven miles the enemy's camps are quite numerous, the heaviest being southwest, south, and southeast from where the balloon is anchored. From appearances I should judge they are fully as strong as ever. A clearer atmosphere, however, will enable me to form a better idea of their relative strength, &c.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
T. S. C. LOWE.
----------------
HEADQUARTERS AERONAUTIC DEPARTMENT,
Camp near Falmouth, Va., April 14, 1863.
Capt. C. B. COMSTOCK,
Chief Engineer, Army of the Potomac:
CAPTAIN: On hearing that Mr. Allen saw a column (while in the balloon near White Oak Church) moving to the right, I immediately went up in the balloon near Falmouth Station to observe if any extra camp smoke or fires could be seen to the west, but was unable to notice any change, except a few camp-fires not noticed before, on the road from Fredericksburg toward Chancellorsville, I should judge about six miles. All the rest of the camps remain the same as usual.
This p.m. three regiments were drilling on the flats, two to the south and one to the right of Fredericksburg.
The following are the compass bearings of the various camps, as seen by Mr. E. S. Allen from balloon near Falmouth Station.
Extreme right to extreme left: No. 1, 8 to 4 miles west; No. 2, 2 miles west by south; No. 3, 2 miles southwest by west; No. 4, 2 to 3 miles southwest: No. 5, 2 to 3 miles southwest by south; No. 6, 2 miles south; No. 7, 4 to 5 miles south: No. 8, 8 to 10 miles south.
The usual amount of smoke arose from all the above camps this evening.
It is evident, from all appearances, that the enemy have not made any considerable move as yet.
The balloons will be up at daybreak if the weather will admit.
Very respectfully,
T. S. C. LOWE,
Chief of Aeronautics, Army of the Potomac.
----------------------
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
Of Campaigns, Battles, Engagements, Actions, Combats, Sieges, Skirmishes, Affairs, Reconnoissances, Scouts and Other Military Events Connected with the "War of the Rebellion" During the Period of Actual Hostilities, From April 12, 1861, to May 26, 1866.

White Oak Church, Va. -- Skir July 1, 1862
----------------------------------------
Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 2 (Campaigns etc.)
Battles, Campaigns, Etc., in Virginia
DATE NATURE LOCATION TROOPS ENGAGED


July 1 Skirmish, White Oak Church PENNSYLVANIA--3d Cavalry.
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M E Wolf

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Messages
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Unites that were at or near White Oak Church

Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 3 (Regimental Histories)
MAINE VOLUNTEERS.
7th REGIMENT INFANTRY.

MARYLAND VOLUNTEERS.
RIGBY'S BATTERY "A" LIGHT ARTILLERY.

MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS.
1st BATTERY LIGHT ARTILLERY.

NEW JERSEY VOLUNTEERS.
21st REGIMENT INFANTRY.

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS.
20th REGIMENT INFANTRY.--("UNITED TURNER REGIMENT.")

PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.
3rd REGIMENT CAVALRY.--(60th VOLUNTEERS.) ("YOUNG'S KENTUCKY LIGHT CAVALRY.")
49th REGIMENT INFANTRY.
119th REGIMENT INFANTRY.

WISCONSIN VOLUNTEERS.
5th REGIMENT INFANTRY.

-----------------------------------------
Medical/Surgical History--Part II, Volume I
Class I.--Zymotic Diseases.--Chapter I.--Diarrhoea And Dysentery.
Section IV.--Complications
CASE 891.--Corporal William I[. Smith, company K, 77th New York volunteers, was admitted to McKim's Mansion hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, June 17, 1863, with paraplegia, tie stated that about the first of February he was admitted to regimental hospital at White Oak Church, Virginia, suffering with chronic diarrhoea and rheumatism. About the last of February he lost the use of his lower limbs, and has been unable to walk ever since, lie attributed this accident to having "taken cold," or to injuries received at one time to the left hip, at another to the left leg, prior to enlistment, from which he supposed he had recovered, lie was subsequently transferred to the hospital at Potomac creek, and afterwards to Lincoln hospital, Washington, whence he came to McKim's Mansion. In this case the magneto-electric machine was used, but only with "slight benefit," and the patient was discharged the service on surgeon's certificate of disability, August 24th.--Acting Assistant Surgeon William G. Smull.
------------------
Medical/Surgical History--Part III, Volume I
Chapter IV.--On The Continued Fevers.
II.--Clinical Records Of The Continued Fevers.
II.--Typho-Malarial And Typhoid Fevers.
CASE 41.--Gangrene of toes.--Private William Wollcott, Co. H, 12th N. Y.; age 53; was admitted June 23, 1863, from Harewood hospital. Washington, D. C. [The records show that this man had typhoid fever at White Oak Church, Va., in March, and that he was received into Harewood hospital, April 21, whence he was transferred to Satterlee hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., as stated.] On admission he was found to have a diarrhoea causing four or five stools daily, and a gangrene, attributed to frost-bite while on picket, involving four of the smaller toes of the right foot and two of those of the left foot; he had also an ulceration of the left buttock which was supposed to have resulted from riding in ambulance wagons. On the 27th the sphacelated parts of the right toes separated leaving clean ulcers, and on July 4 the first joints of the second and third toes of the left foot were removed by operation. Water dressing was applied. On the 29th the patient was furloughed. On September 4 he was transferred to the Invalid Corps.--Satterlee Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa.
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M E Wolf

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AAR Summary;

Unfortunately, the weather was extremely hot and humid. So hot the skeeters didn't bother humans, as it was too hot for them to move also.

Confederate units outnumbered the one Union--yet, historically, the Union outnumbered the Confederate forces in the 1860's.

White Oak Church across from the museum, was closed. The museum though was filled with excellent period items and worthwhile to stop in and visit. It is one of those museums that is extremely easy to miss as it is rather humble.

Having a firehouse so nearby, any and all medical and or fire incidents could be addressed. This is extremely important when dry grass and embers may cause an incident. A worthy note though, the safety procedures from Artillery, Infantry and guests made it an incident free weekend.

The school converted to museum, had a clear field as to parade, muster and skirmish on. There was plenty of field for many more units. I am of the belief that the economy was a factor of many individuals not gathering, as well as the heat and or distance.

The Thirtieth Virginia Infantry which has a mortar also, were the perfect host and those in the headquarters and their staff did an excellent job as to create a excellent executed skirmish for both weekends. A mountain howitzer and a Parrot were on hand and fired generously, supplied by other Virginia units.

It is worthy of consideration, that more units make an effort to participate in. Very easy to get to from I-95 (Rt. 17/Falmouth) exit.
Gas is $0.20 cheaper than elsewhere the closer one gets to White Oak Church/Museum's location.

Good bathroom facilities are in the museum as well as being handicap friendly, having a ramp into the museum. Very clean and kid friendly for those families who wish to bring children to a living history and or re-enactment.

A good weekend spent. Highly recommended.

Respectfully submitted for consideration,
M. E. Wolf
 
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