Research Counting the Confederate Service Records of Black and Mulatto Men

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
821
Joseph Parkman
Musician
"colored troops"
Company A, 18th Battalion Georgia Infantry
CSR


Enlisted at Green Island near Savannah, GA, March 1, 1862. Surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, VA, April 9, 1865.
"Roll dated Headquarters 18th Georgia Battalion, April 10, 1865: Enlisted for the war colored troops."

Parkman, Joseph.jpg

Parkman, Joseph (2).jpg

Parkman, Joseph (1).jpg
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
825

uncle jeff.jpg


“Uncle” Jeff Mabry, Jeff was reportedly 110 years old when he died. He was a native of Georgia. He married in 1920 at the age of 101. “Uncle” Jeff was proud to be known as the “head chicken thief of the 3rd Texas Cavalry,” and the only Black Confederate in Hopkins County, Texas. He went to the war with Brigadier-General, Hinche Parham Mabry and served faithfully with him until the surrender in May 1865. He was cared for and provided food, a roof over his head, and medical care by Confederate Veterans. He belonged to a local UCV Camp and attended the monthly meetings. He also attended all the reunions up until a year before his death in 1929. His death occurred during the 1929 reunion in Charlotte, NC. The above photo is from the 1914 reunion in Jacksonville, Florida.

http://www.b17.com/campford2/generals/mabry.htm
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
825

View attachment 399912

“Uncle” Jeff Mabry, Jeff was reportedly 110 years old when he died. He was a native of Georgia. He married in 1920 at the age of 101. “Uncle” Jeff was proud to be known as the “head chicken thief of the 3rd Texas Cavalry,” and the only Black Confederate in Hopkins County, Texas. He went to the war with Brigadier-General, Hinche Parham Mabry and served faithfully with him until the surrender in May 1865. He was cared for and provided food, a roof over his head, and medical care by Confederate Veterans. He belonged to a local UCV Camp and attended the monthly meetings. He also attended all the reunions up until a year before his death in 1929. His death occurred during the 1929 reunion in Charlotte, NC. The above photo is from the 1914 reunion in Jacksonville, Florida.

http://www.b17.com/campford2/generals/mabry.htm
Here's a video of the 1914 reunion. Jeff appears about the 1:40 mark.

 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
829
F. J. Barnard (white)
Captain
Creole Guards Company
News Archive

830
Ovide Gregory
1st Lieutenant
Creole Guards Company
News Archive

831
J. B. Guicon
2nd Lieutenant
Creole Guards Company
News Archive


Mobile Register, February 14, 1862:
Mobile_Register_1862-02-14_[2].png




The C is probably a mis-transcribed O as there was no one by the name of "C. Gregory" in Mobile.
Gregory, C.jpg

Guison, J B.jpg
 
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19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
832
James Hutto

-
"free person of color"
South Carolina
CSR


Enlisted at Battery at Edisto Railroad Bridge, August 7, 1864.



833
Mathusalem Chavis
-
"free person of color"
South Carolina
CSR


Enlisted at Battery at Edisto Railroad Bridge, August 7, 1864.



Veal, Thomas C (28).jpg
 
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RedRover

Private
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
An unnamed negro substitute in the Virginia Reserves, late 1864:

From the compiled service record of J.R. Adams, who enlisted in Captain Richard M. Scott’s company of “Amelia Reserves” at Amelia Courthouse, VA on August 9, 1864. The company was then attached Captain C.E. Averett’s Battalion of Virginia Reserves in the defenses at Mattoax, VA.
Col. Benjamin L. Farinholt’s Regiment of Virginia Reserves was organized August 12, 1864 by the consolidation of Farinholt’s own “Staunton River Battalion” of Virginia reserves and Averett’s Battalion. Captain Scott’s “Amelia Reserves” including Private Adams, were then designated Company “H” of Farinholt’s regiment.
By September 20, 1864 Farinholt’s Regiment of Reserves was included in the defenses of High Bridge, Mattoax, and Staunton River Bridges commanded by General James A. Walker, CS Army. Walker’s force was attached to the First Military District, Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, commanded by General Henry A. Wise.
By December 31, 1864 the company reported Adams was absent from the ranks, having “put in a negro substitute for 30 days.”
Unfortunately this man was not further identified in Adam's record.
Col. Farinholt’s command was renamed as the 1st Regiment Virginia Reserves on February 27, 1865. On that date the command included 523 men, of whom only 17 officers and 233 men were present and fit for duty. Adams was not among them. On February 28, 1865 he was reported as absent-sick, for the period of January-February of that year.
At that time the regiment was attached to a brigade commanded by General Patrick T. Moore. A brigade is a combination of two or more regiments, usually commanded by a brigadier general. Moore’s brigade was assigned to the defenses of Richmond, Virginia commanded by Lt. General Richard S. Ewell.
On March 18, 1865 Private Adams was admitted to the CS Army General Hospital at Farmville, Virginia for a case of diarrhea. He was returned to duty on March 21. His regiment was in Lee's retreat to Appomattox, with most captured at Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865. Adams surrendered at Burkesville, VA in mid-April.

J. Marshall,
Hernando, FL.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
An unnamed negro substitute in the Virginia Reserves, late 1864:
From the compiled service record of J.R. Adams....
By December 31, 1864 the company reported Adams was absent from the ranks, having “put in a negro substitute for 30 days.”
Unfortunately this man was not further identified in Adam's record....
J. Marshall,
Hernando, FL.
838
[unnamed substitute]
-
"negro"
Company H, 1st (Farinholt's) Virginia Reserves
CSR

Adams, J R.jpg

Adams, J R (1).jpg
 
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RedRover

Private
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
Some references to negro body servants with Confederate units.

Mr. Robert A. Marshall, Delaplane, VA, in the Richmond Times Dispatch, Sept. 14, 1913.

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He also recorded some incidents of Mr. Dave Lane, body servant to brothers Thomas and James Marshall (of Fairfield, Fauquier County, VA, serving as privates with Co. E, 12th VA Cavalry, Laurel Brigade):
1622727890431.png



I see reference of many similar camp servants, etc. in the "Laurel Brigade." For example, Pvt. James A. Walker of the US 2nd Maryland captured on the 3rd of December, 1863 by the Confederates, and who escaped near Brock’s Gap on the 5th, saw among them what appeared to be “three companies of negro troops, cavalry, armed with carbines. They were not engaged in the attack, but were stationed with the reserve. The guards, he reports, freely admitted to the prisoners that they were accompanied by negro soldiers, stating, however, that the North had shown the example.” [Evening Star, Washington, DC, 1-19-1864.]

Even in the CS infantry: Even in the Confederate infantry negro camp servants could be found in numbers, and well armed. Union soldier Henry S. White noted after his capture by Confederate troops, “plenty of negroes were in the army in Confederate uniform with muskets in their hands. When we asked if the negroes were not soldiers, they said they were servants to planter’s sons, and when on a march carried their arms.” Henry S. White, Prison Life Among the Rebels: Recollections of a Union Chaplain, Edward D. Jervey, ed. (Kent, OH, Kent State University Press, 1990), 18.

James Marshall,
Hernando, FL
 
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