Discussion Counting Instances of Black Confederates in the Official Reports

jgoodguy

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Serial 002 Page 0185 Chapter IX. OPERATIONS IN SHENANDOAH VALLEY

Report of Colonel T. J. Jackson, C. S. Army, Commanding First Brigade.

(Battle of Hoke's Run, Falling Waters, or Hainesville, now West Virginia)

7/2/1861

Colonel (J.E.B) Stuart reports his capture of an entire company (the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers), with the exception of the Captain. Three, resisting, were killed. He further reports that "one of the enemy was killed by a negro of Captain Carter's and one of Captain Patrick's Company."

Eyewitness by Military: Yes

Combat: Yes

Military source other than eyewitness: No

CSA Source: Yes

Civilian source: No
I'd classify this an eyewitness=no as Stewart is reporting something that came from other military sources and thus Military sources other than eyewitness=yes. Good to see a CSA source.

One more time-- we are gathering information to be analyzed mostly in everyone's mind's eye. These may be or may not be Black Confederates in someone's opinion.
 
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I'd classify this an eyewitness=no as Stewart is reporting something that came from other military sources and thus Military sources other than eyewitness=yes. Good to see a CSA source.

One more time-- we are gathering information to be analyzed mostly in everyone's mind's eye. These may be or may not be Black Confederates in someone's opinion.

Accidentally posted this on the the wrong thread. My bad.

Serial 016 Page 0749 Chapter XXIV. CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

On the 31st the brigade accompanied General Stuart on a scout to Chantilly, picking up 200 or 300 prisoners. A portion of the Twelfth, under Lieutenant-Colonel [R. H.] Burks, captured one company of the Tenth New York Cavalry without firing a gun.
On the evening of September 1, while our troops were engaged on the Ox road, near Germantown, my regiment was ordered to Leesburg to capture Means and his party.
About 11 a. m. the next day I arrived at Leesburg. Learning that Means was in the town, I cut across from the Dranesville pike and entered the town by the Edwards Ferry road. I succeeded in surprising Means’ party, Means himself escaping. He was supported by Major Cole, of Maryland, with about 200 men, on the Point of Rocks road. Without halting in the town I pressed heavily upon him, and soon succeeded in routing his command after a heavy skirmish, and pursued them as far as Waterford, 7 miles. My command amounted to 163 men, about 40 of which number, including Captain Dickinson and Lieutenants [W. R.] Beale and [A. D.] Warwick, did not join in the charge from some cause not yet explained. Had they followed their comrades in this bold charge I do not think a dozen of the whole Yankee command would have escaped being either killed or captured. As it was, we killed 11, wounded 9 too badly to be sent away, besides some 10 or 11 who escaped badly wounded, and sent off 47 prisoners, including 2 captains and 3 lieutenants.
In this charge Lieutenant J. O. Davis, of Company E, was killed while gallantly leading the advance of his company. Lieutenant John O. Lasley, of Company K, had his arm fractured by a rifle-ball, Sergt. Charles Spears, Company C, was killed. Private N. McGhee, Captain Dearing, of Company F, and John Merryman, of Company I, were badly wounded. It is proper to report that Edward, a servant of Private English, Company K, went into the charge, following his master, gun in hand, and shot the notorious Everhart, who was left in Leesburg, badly wounded.
* * * * * * *
I am, Major, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
THOMAS T. MUNFORD,
Colonel Second Virginia Cavalry.
 

Tin cup

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Am I wrong in thinking someone who rode in a cavalry charge, carrying a gun and shot an enemy was a soldier no matter what he was called on paper?
You might want to ask the confederate government that very question, because I don't think they thought blacks should be armed, let alone fight. That might make them EQUAL with the whites!:nah disagree:

Kevin Dally
 
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DaveBrt

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Am I wrong in thinking someone who rode in a cavalry charge, carrying a gun and shot an enemy was a soldier no matter what he was called on paper?
Yes, you are wrong. Go try shooting someone and use that as a defense.

A soldier has been enlisted (formally) into the service of the government -- like a sheriff, marshal, policeman. A non-enlisted man who kills another, except in defense of his or another's life, is a murderer.
 

jgoodguy

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Yes, you are wrong. Go try shooting someone and use that as a defense.

A soldier has been enlisted (formally) into the service of the government -- like a sheriff, marshal, policeman. A non-enlisted man who kills another, except in defense of his or another's life, is a murderer.

Interesting, but not exactly true. A combatant AKA soldier in that day and time did not have to enlist, just be in a body of men with distinctive markings on clothing and under the command of an officer commissioned by a government. A soldier may never fire a weapon at an enemy. A black confederate may or may not be a combatant and may or may not be black. There is no generally accepted term for black confederate and the terms soldier or combatant can be slippery too.
 

thomas aagaard

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Even the term "black" is slippery. Even the CSA wardepartment realized that in this case...
Black Enslistment Seddon Kirby Smith copy.jpg
 
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