Could the battle of Chickamaga be heard from Chattanooga?

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#1
I have heard conflicting reports about how far artillery could be heard during battles, and some reports that there was a region where you heard nothing between to ares of loud crashes.

Also, when General Thomas moved from his position on the 19th to Chattanooga, would he have time to move wounded men on ambulances with him, or would have to abandon them?
 

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#2
The following doesn't actually answer the question.

Annals of the 57th Indiana Inf.

The 57th Indiana was assigned to duty as provost-guards in Chattanooga.

On Saturday, September 19th, the news was received that a battle was going on in front, but the rumors were so conflicting that it was a difficult matter to obtain the position of our army, or any definite information concerning the engagement. On Sunday morning quiet prevailed. Guards were mounted as usual, and marched down Main Street. Services were held at the churches; and though it was known that a battle was then going on, there was no excitement until noon. At 12 o'clock the order was received for the orderlies to send every man to the depot. Prisoners were arriving in large numbers, and required all of our available
force to guard them.

In obedience to orders received from our adjutant, I hunted up and reported every man in the company, not on the sick list, and returned to keep watch over our quarters, where I remained until near 4 o'clock in the afternoon. At that hour there was an almost constant stream of ambulances and baggage wagons coming from the front. A large brick residence on the hill, south-east of our quarters, which had been used as an officers' hospital, was now nearly filled with wounded.

On going down Main Street I found every foot of space crowded with teams, hurrying on toward the pontoon bridge. Heavy clouds of dust almost enveloped the town, and could be seen thickly rising on the road which led to the south. Teamsters were cursing and whipping. The sidewalks were filled with the wounded, stragglers and scattered musicians, carrying drums, fifes, or brass instruments. It was one constant rush toward the river, accompanied by the almost unanimous declaration that we had better be getting on the north side of the Tennessee.

Upon reaching the depot buildings I found them crowded with prisoners, and many, unable to gain admittance, remained outside. Many of the prisoners were from Longstreet's corps, late of the rebel army in Virginia. These men were better clothed than the soldiers of Bragg's army. They had always, till now, been used to victory, and were loud in their abuse of our men who had them in charge. Some of them openly declared that before the sun set on Monday, Bragg would be in Chattanooga. Many rumors had reached us to the effect that our army had been overpowered by the arrival of heavy re-enforcements from Lee's army, but until we saw them, and listened to their abusive language, all had dared to hope that the story of rebel re-enforcements would prove untrue.
 
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#3
'Shadow Acoustics' had been mentioned as early on as The Seven Days Battles in Virginia. There it was observed due to closeness of terrain, lack of visibility, etc. When General Bragg moved south out of Chattanooga, the main hospitals had been relocated into Georgia. Being that the confederates had possession of the battlefield, numbers of dead and wounded were certainly left behind. Thomas made a stand at Rossville allowing most stragglers and wounded returning to escape without capture, those that could walk or be carried along. The mountains resound and echo all about Chattanooga, and most likely observation of that fact can be found among the civilians, and even the men in command that arrived early on. The general activity is very well explained in @57th Indiana Infantry post directly above.
Thanks, Lubliner.
 
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#4
The following doesn't actually answer the question.

Annals of the 57th Indiana Inf.

The 57th Indiana was assigned to duty as provost-guards in Chattanooga.

On Saturday, September 19th, the news was received that a battle was going on in front, but the rumors were so conflicting that it was a difficult matter to obtain the position of our army, or any definite information concerning the engagement. On Sunday morning quiet prevailed. Guards were mounted as usual, and marched down Main Street. Services were held at the churches; and though it was known that a battle was then going on, there was no excitement until noon. At 12 o'clock the order was received for the orderlies to send every man to the depot. Prisoners were arriving in large numbers, and required all of our available
force to guard them.

In obedience to orders received from our adjutant, I hunted up and reported every man in the company, not on the sick list, and returned to keep watch over our quarters, where I remained until near 4 o'clock in the afternoon. At that hour there was an almost constant stream of ambulances and baggage wagons coming from the front. A large brick residence on the hill, south-east of our quarters, which had been used as an officers' hospital, was now nearly filled with wounded.

On going down Main Street I found every foot of space crowded with teams, hurrying on toward the pontoon bridge. Heavy clouds of dust almost enveloped the town, and could be seen thickly rising on the road which led to the south. Teamsters were cursing and whipping. The sidewalks were filled with the wounded, stragglers and scattered musicians, carrying drums, fifes, or brass instruments. It was one constant rush toward the river, accompanied by the almost unanimous declaration that we had better be getting on the north side of the Tennessee.

Upon reaching the depot buildings I found them crowded with prisoners, and many, unable to gain admittance, remained outside. Many of the prisoners were from Longstreet's corps, late of the rebel army in Virginia. These men were better clothed than the soldiers of Bragg's army. They had always, till now, been used to victory, and were loud in their abuse of our men who had them in charge. Some of them openly declared that before the sun set on Monday, Bragg would be in Chattanooga. Many rumors had reached us to the effect that our army had been overpowered by the arrival of heavy re-enforcements from Lee's army, but until we saw them, and listened to their abusive language, all had dared to hope that the story of rebel re-enforcements would prove untrue.
It answers it precisely. It has all kinds of information I needed in precisely way I needed it. thank you so very much.
 
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#7
How did the citizens and soldiers of Chattanooga get firewood during the siege? Too close to Missionary ridge would be fatal, and my understanding is there were lots of soldiers in a really small space. My reading says soldiers were camping in people's yards.

What were the sanitary arrangements like? How would people keep the sanitary arrangements away from the water?
 

gary

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#8
How did the citizens and soldiers of Chattanooga get firewood during the siege? Too close to Missionary ridge would be fatal, and my understanding is there were lots of soldiers in a really small space. My reading says soldiers were camping in people's yards.

What were the sanitary arrangements like? How would people keep the sanitary arrangements away from the water?
Dunno about Firewood. Mebbe Grant went back into the wood selling business?

Bet there were wells around town people could draw from. Older homes would have them.
 
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#9
Dunno about Firewood. Mebbe Grant went back into the wood selling business?

Bet there were wells around town people could draw from. Older homes would have them.
Which sort of makes my point. There were 80,000 men there on the union side in a small space. And it was cold in November.
 

uaskme

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#12
How did the citizens and soldiers of Chattanooga get firewood during the siege? Too close to Missionary ridge would be fatal, and my understanding is there were lots of soldiers in a really small space. My reading says soldiers were camping in people's yards.

What were the sanitary arrangements like? How would people keep the sanitary arrangements away from the water?
Chattanooga was a Frontier Town in 1863. Most evacuated when Bragg left. Population about 2500 before the war. I suspect only a few that the Federals wanted to stay, did. Federals were in about a mile square on the South bank of the TN River. The North Shore they controlled. They will pretty quickly cut every tree within that area, Chattanooga. Dig up the tree roots, and burn those. They will send out parties to obtain fire wood, north bank. When the Federals take Orchard Knob, firewood crews are immediately deployed. Federals will push the Confederates back to Missionary Ridge. Probably 1 1/2 miles or so. Rebels are going to yell, if you needed firewood that bad, we would have sent you some. They had pit latrines. The effects of cleanliness is well know by this time.

Before the Siege is over. Hooker and Shermans Troops trapped by the wrecked Pontoon Bridge, will be in Lookout Valley, Stringers Ridge will be occupied, (North Shore), Sherman never comes into the City. He deploys at North Chickamauga Creek. So, not all of the Federals are confined inside the City.
 

Robtweb1

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#13
I read a report once that the guns at Chickamauga could be heard in Rome, GA, some 70 miles south. Sorry I don't remember the source, I read that a long time ago.
 
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#14
I read a report once that the guns at Chickamauga could be heard in Rome, GA, some 70 miles south. Sorry I don't remember the source, I read that a long time ago.
Factors such as wind direction, humidity, temperature and overcast skies with low clouds all can contribute to "acoustic shadow".
 



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