Could Morgan's Raiders Really Have Used This?

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
When I was a child both my Grandmothers told family stories and about their relatives. I sure wish I had written them down back then but was to young and just didn't know the significance of them. As I have researched my family, things they told me come back and now make sense. I am glad they told me things and now I can begin to apply them to my research.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
My father was in the RAF for over 30 years starting just after WW1, so he had a great collection of tales.
Oh wow! That’s my 3rd favorite history. I have a collection of history books on WW1 aviation and booklets on various WW1 aircraft and their color schemes.
During the 1960’s, there was a small booklet published in UK called Profile Publications. I think I have all of the ones about WW1 aircraft.
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
When I was a child both my Grandmothers told family stories and about their relatives. I sure wish I had written them down back then but was to young and just didn't know the significance of them. As I have researched my family, things they told me come back and now make sense. I am glad they told me things and now I can begin to apply them to my research.
I feel exactly the same way. So many of the threads I've been reading have triggered memories of stories from my elders and it's amazing how they fit together and support the history.
 

CyleKostello

Private
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Location
Boston Mass/ Seattle Wa
Neat story regardless of the veracity! Absolutely agree with the folks saying write it down. Always loving hearing these family legends.
I've been trying to nail down the story of how a far distant ancestor escaped slavery and joined the USCT. However every family member seems to have a slightly different version of the story!
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
Neat story regardless of the veracity! Absolutely agree with the folks saying write it down. Always loving hearing these family legends.
I've been trying to nail down the story of how a far distant ancestor escaped slavery and joined the USCT. However every family member seems to have a slightly different version of the story!
Yet the kernel of truth we find in in all their stories is what keeps us entertained 150 years later as we try to track down records of what really happened! Let's give a cheer for record keepers ☺ I also think our elders were trying to tell us "life is hard but don't give up." If our ancestors can push through hard times so can we 👍
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
Do you have any information on your Uncle? Have you looked him up on Ancestry or Fold 3?

Interesting pot.
Thanks to the truly excellent sources suggested by everyone, and with thanks to ancestors who left letters and written accounts of family events, I now have a more complete story of Benjamin J. Cooper and why he is the only Confederate I can find (so far) in the family tree, and I will share his story for those who might be interested.
When Ben was 17, in 1860, his sister married. The following year his brother-in-law was killed and Ben's sister was left a widow with a month old baby - the family believing this was because her husband was a known southern sympathizer even though their particular town in Kentucky was mostly pro Union. The murderer was never identified. Ben joined the Confederacy less than a year later, in the 4th Regiment, which later became the 8th Regiment, KY Calvary, CSA.
He was taken prisoner near Bluffington Island, Ohio on July, 19, 1863; was received as a POW at Camp Morton, in Indianapolis, IN on July 23; was transferred from Camp Morton on August 18; and arrived at Camp Douglas, Chicago, IL on August 22, 1863.
After a year and a half at Camp Douglas, he was paroled and transferred on February 24, 1865 to Point Lookout, MD for exchange. He may have written from Chillicothe, OH to his family letting them know he was a prisoner, but he was not imprisoned there any length of time - at least there is no official record of that. He walked home, (from Maryland?) after the war, accompanied by a man named John Barr, after refusing to take the Oath of Allegiance.
He never recovered his health, dying at age 47. His two daughters were aged 7 years and 6 months when he died. They never married.
 
Last edited:
Top