Corydon The forgotten Battle of the Civil War.

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
I bought this yesterday.
Corydon.jpg


I am not sure I have read much about the Battle of Corydon. So the Battle of Corydon was in Indiana? Perhaps I should read this book.
 

Rusk County Avengers

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 8, 2018
Location
Coffeeville, TX
Never heard of this book, I do vaguely recollect hearing or reading of a "Battle of Corydon" somewhere though.

The book does raise suspicions for me as to its accuracy by the statement on the cover "Only Two official Civil War Battles were fought on Northern Soil-Gettysburg and Corydon!" which is thoroughly inaccurate statement.

You got Sharpsburg/Antietam, fights from Morgan's Raid in the Midwest, Kansas, and if one considers everywhere in that State outside of the Southern part of it, Missouri, as "North" like I do you got a lot of battles on Northern Soil.
 

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Never heard of this book, I do vaguely recollect hearing or reading of a "Battle of Corydon" somewhere though.

The book does raise suspicions for me as to its accuracy by the statement on the cover "Only Two official Civil War Battles were fought on Northern Soil-Gettysburg and Corydon!" which is thoroughly inaccurate statement.

You got Sharpsburg/Antietam, fights from Morgan's Raid in the Midwest, Kansas, and if one considers everywhere in that State outside of the Southern part of it, Missouri, as "North" like I do you got a lot of battles on Northern Soil.
Well, maybe @major bill should read it so he can explain to us how come the author or editor has made such a statement on the cover. If it is a sales gimmick for promotion, I also wonder what age-group he would be targeting. Interested!
Lubliner.
 

mofederal

Major
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Location
Southeast Missouri
Athens, Missouri was very far "North" being on the border of Iowa. A river separates the two states, and a cannon ball from the fight fired by the Confederate forces landed in the river.

battle of athens, mo.jpg


49337680486_c0f50f2314_z.jpg
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Yes on the cover I wondered what an "official" battle was and what the author considers "Northern soil".
the book is only 126 pages long to include illustrations and index so I think I will go ahead and read it.
 

Lampasas Bill

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 24, 2018
Perhaps he is implying a non-slave state, in which case, unfortunately, Athens, Missouri, and Antietam, Maryland, would not qualify. Certainly the fights against Morgan's raiders, and against Price's raiders in Kansas would qualify.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
I finished the book today and it was not real bad. W. Fred Conway never said why it was one of only two "official" battle on Northern soil. The book itself is short and the section on the Battle of Corydon is even sorter. The battle itself was rather brief so only so much can be said about such a short battle. I did like the three eyewitness description the the battle.
 

PeytonT

Cadet
Joined
Sep 9, 2020
I have been to the battlefield. Not a large battle more akin to a skirmish. From what I recall it is now a small building with some information inside. However I know they do re-enactments there sometimes.
 

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
I finished the book today and it was not real bad. W. Fred Conway never said why it was one of only two "official" battle on Northern soil. The book itself is short and the section on the Battle of Corydon is even sorter. The battle itself was rather brief so only so much can be said about such a short battle. I did like the three eyewitness description the the battle.
So did he name the 'other' battle his cover pitch stated? I would be interested if he did, being it would give us some idea of what he was referring to. I sort of doubt he did though. I have heard that many times, 'you can't always judge a book by it's cover.' I am glad you thought it worth reading. I have set more than one aside, for whatever reason.
Lubliner.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
So did he name the 'other' battle his cover pitch stated? I would be interested if he did, being it would give us some idea of what he was referring to. I sort of doubt he did though. I have heard that many times, 'you can't always judge a book by it's cover.' I am glad you thought it worth reading. I have set more than one aside, for whatever reason.
Lubliner.

According to Conway the two "official" battles on Northern soil are Gettysburg and Corydon. As pointed out the Battle of Corydon could be call a skirmish.
 

NFB22

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Location
Louisville, KY
The cover description also threw me for a loop. Though Morgan's raiders and the Indiana Legion did square off in what I would describe as a "battle" it wasn't very large with only minor casualties. The Confederate forces rather quickly forced the militia into submission.
If this is an "official" battle, I'd be curious as to what the author has to say about Buffington Island or Salineville in Ohio or the other actions in Pennsylvania like Fairfield or Hanover.

That said, Corydon does have a fascinating history as it served as the first state capital of Indiana after achieving statehood. The first statehouse is still there along with the stump of the "constitutional elm" that the state territorial leaders supposedly gathered under in the summer heat. The entire downtown area is a historic district including the old governor's mansion and historic homes that are tied to the battle. The battlefield is only a small portion of the actual battlefield and has a period log cabin, 1 gun plus a few memorials and markers on site. The entire area is dotted with markers detailing Morgan's path through southern Indiana.
 
Top