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Period "Corporal's Kitchen" To Corn Beef, Scott's Battery Newsletter, March 2017

Discussion in 'Foods of the Civil War' started by Albert Sailhorst, Feb 16, 2017.

  1. Albert Sailhorst

    Albert Sailhorst 2nd Lieutenant

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    Libby_McNeill_&_Libby_Corned_Beef_1898.jpg

    Corporal's Kitchen


    As St. Patrick's Day draws near, a fine meal of Corned Beef and Cabbage should be planned. Though Corned Beef and Cabbage is not a traditional meal in Ireland, it IS a traditional St. Patrick's Day meal of the American-Irish, here's why: During the Great Potato Famine (between 1845-1852), the Irish that had emigrated to America began making more money then they had in Ireland under British rule. With more money for food, the Irish could better afford meat. But instead of their beloved bacon, the Irish began eating beef. And, the beef they could afford just happened to be corned beef, the thing their great grandparents were famous for. Yet, the corned beef the Irish immigrants ate was much different than that produced in Ireland 200 years prior. The Irish immigrants almost exclusively bought their meat from kosher butchers. And what we think of today as Irish corned beef is actually Jewish corned beef thrown into a pot with cabbage and potatoes. The Jewish population in New York City at the time were relatively new immigrants from Eastern and Central Europe. The corned beef they made was from brisket, a kosher cut of meat from the front of the cow. Since brisket is a tougher cut, the salting and cooking process transformed the meat into the extremely tender, flavorful corned beef we know of today.

    The Corporal is found of serving Corned Beef & Cabbage as part of his own celebration, despite the pleas of his wife to not stink up the house! Fortunately for him, no one else in his household will eat it, so there are plenty of left-overs for himself to make into sandwiches!

    To Corn Beef

    From "Housekeeping In Old Virginia", Edited By Marion Cabell Tyree

    "To Corn Beef. For every hundred pounds of beef, take : 6 pounds salt. 2 pounds brown sugar. 2 ounces saltpetre. 3 or 4 ounces soda. 1 ounce red pepper. The whole to be dissolved in four gallons of water. The beef must be closely packed in a barrel, and the mixture poured over so as to cover it. Let it stand a week or ten days, or longer if the weather is cold ; then pour off the brine, boil it, and skim off the blood. Let it cool, and pour back on the beef. Warranted to keep."

    Notes: Beef Brisket would be the type of beef used. Saltpetre can be purchased at a local pharmacy. "Soda" refers to Baking Soda.

    Interesting Irish Confederate Facts: Although significantly fewer Irish lived in the Confederate States of America, six Confederate generals were Irish-born. Units such as the Charleston Irish Volunteers attracted Confederate Irish-Americans in South Carolina, the 24th Georgia Volunteer Infantry followed General Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb, while Irish Tennesseans could join the 10th Tennessee Infantry. A company of the Washington Blues regiment of the Missouri Volunteer Militia (later the Missouri State Guard), commanded by Colonel Joseph Kelly, was the subject of a Confederate version of a Union song, "Kelly's Irish Brigade". The Louisiana Tigers, first raised by Major Chatham Roberdeau Wheat, had a large number of Irish American members. Company E, Emerald Guard,33rd Virginia of the Stonewall Brigade composed of Irish immigrant volunteers may have been first to initiate "rebel yell" at 1st Bull Run attacking 14th New York guns on Henry Hill.

    Professor David Gleeson has recently undertaken the most detailed review of the Irish in the Confederacy yet produced, which includes an attempt to accurately estimate the numbers of Irish who served the South during the war. The figure he arrives at is c. 20,000 men; although dwarfed in comparison to Irish service in the Federal forces, such a total would, in fact, represent the enlistment of just over 50% of those Irishmen of military age in the South, a proportion which significantly exceeds that seen in the North.

    Major General Patrick Ronayne Cleburne-Born March 17, 1828, Killumney County, Ireland. Killed during the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864. He was last seen advancing on foot toward the Union line with his sword raised, after his horse was shot out from under him. Accounts later said that he was found just inside the Federal line and his body carried back to an aid station along the Columbia Turnpike. Confederate war records indicate he died of a shot to the abdomen, or possibly a bullet that went through his heart. When Confederates found his body, he had been picked clean of any valuable items, including his sword, boots and pocket watch.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 17, 2017
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  3. Anna Elizabeth Henry

    Anna Elizabeth Henry Sergeant Major Silver Patron

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    Nothing like the traditional dish of corned beef and cabbage! I'm sure to see it popping up everywhere soon along with another favorite of mine, soda bread.

    Thanks for sharing the details about Irish Confederates. I never thought there were that many as most immigrants chose to live in the industrial north as jobs were far easier to come by there. Cleburne's story is a sad one, as he left a sweetheart (I believe her name was Susan Tarleton) behind when he died. I think the story goes that she found out about his death while in her garden when she heard a newsboy shouting about the battle and the death of Cleburne in the headlines :frown:
     
  4. nitrofd

    nitrofd Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    Cleburne was killed at Franklin,Nashville was two weeks later.
     
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  5. Albert Sailhorst

    Albert Sailhorst 2nd Lieutenant

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    Holy Smokes!!....What was I thinking??.....I KNEW that, too!!.....Thanks for the correction!
     
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  6. nitrofd

    nitrofd Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    By the Albert I love corned beef.
     
  7. Eleanor Rose

    Eleanor Rose First Sergeant

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    Corned beef hash is a somewhat popular breakfast item in NC. I had never heard anything about the Irish Confederates. Interesting post @Albert Sailhorst!
     
  8. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    I love a good corned beef brisket.

    As St. Patrick's Day will be here in a few weeks, I'm sure corned beef briskets will be in abundance at most grocers.

    My favorite way to prepare this cut of beef is to slow smoke it for about six hours on a backyard grill. ( a Weber kettle grill is perfect).

    After smoking , thinly slice the brisket against the grain & the steam said slices of corned beef for two hours.

    End result . . . homemade pastrami !

    Skipping the steam is OK too, a smoked corned beef brisket on it's own is fantastic.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2017
  9. Legion Para

    Legion Para Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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  10. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Happy St. Patrick's Day to all.

    Thought bump this delightful thread for the occasion.
     
  11. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Just love the picture of can of corned beef.
     
  12. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Always find it so interesting to read about company histories. Libby, McNeill and Libby started in 1875 in Chicago.

    See their site at:

    http://www.libbys.com/our-history
     
  13. Albert Sailhorst

    Albert Sailhorst 2nd Lieutenant

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    Tomorrow (March 18) I will check my local grocery store for discounted Corned Beef, and I will try the Pastrami recipe!!.....Thanks!
     
  14. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    Here's some more details:
    http://howtobbqright.com/2017/03/17/smoked-pastrami/

    I think you'll like it ! :thumbsup:
     
  15. Albert Sailhorst

    Albert Sailhorst 2nd Lieutenant

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  16. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    It is !

    Malcom is a pretty cool guy. He has no problems sharing some of the secrets of the Memphis in May BBQ circuit.

    In a past lifetime, I was a member of one of those Memphis championship BBQ teams.

    Malcom Reed knows his q' !
     
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  17. Albert Sailhorst

    Albert Sailhorst 2nd Lieutenant

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    WOW!!.....I
    miss Memphis In May......I lived in Jackson, TN from 1994 to 2000.....Before that, I vacationed in TN (as a kid) because my dad was from Lauderdale County and we used to go to West TN every year.....I live "up north" now, and I miss the South.....
     
  18. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    My ex Mother-in -Law was from Jackson, TN.

    I know that area well.
    There's some great Q in Jackson, TN as well. :smoke:
     
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  19. Albert Sailhorst

    Albert Sailhorst 2nd Lieutenant

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    I miss Latham's Bar-Be-Cue and others.....I lived on the Southside, just about 2 miles out of town on Hwy 45
     
  20. nitrofd

    nitrofd Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    We had a really good corned beef yesterday,it was as soft as butter and sweet as sugar.the leftovers will make some great sandwiches and. Some corned beef hash and eggs on sunday.
     

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