Period "Corporal's Kitchen"-Soup Recipes, March 2019

Joined
Jul 12, 2007
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Location
Aledo, IL
#1
April is soon to be upon us, bringing a welcomed respite from the harsh cruelties of the winter we have just endured. Some days the weather will be nice, lulling us to our outdoor cooking; while other days might be cold and rainy. On the cooler, damper days of Spring, we offer the following Soup recipes to renew your spirit with a hearty meal to warm you to your toes. These recipes are simple to make. It is our desire that you spend a Saturday with your family, preparing and sharing such historical meals. Please ask the Corporal any questions related to these recipes and be sure to let him know that you have tried them!
From “A New System of Domestic Cookery”, by Maria Eliza Ketelby Rundell, 1807.


Vegetable Soup

Pare and slice five or six cucumbers; and add to these the inside of as many cos-lettuces, a sprig or two of mint, two or three onions, some pepper and salt, a pint and a half of young peas, and a little parsley. Put these, with half a pound of fresh butter, into a sauce-pan, to stew in their own liquor, near a gentle fire, half an hour; then pour two quarts of boiling-water to the vegetables, and stew them two hours; rub down a little flour into a tea-cupful of water, boil it with the rest fifteen or twenty minutes, and serve it.
Another way.--Peel and slice six large onions, six potatoes, six carrots, and four turnips; fry them in half a pound of butter, and pour on them four quarts of boiling water. Toast a crust of bread as brown and hard as possible, but do not burn it; put that, some celery, sweet herbs, white pepper, and salt, to the above; stew it all gently four hours, then strain it through a coarse cloth: have ready sliced carrot, celery, and a little turnip, and add to your liking; and stew them tender in the soup. If approved, you may add an anchovy, and a spoonful of ketchup.


Soup A-la-Sap

Boil half a pound of grated potatoes, a pound of beef sliced thin, a pint of grey peas, an onion, and three ounces of rice, in six pints of water, to five; strain it through a colander; then pulp the peas to it, and turn it into a sauce-pan again with two heads of celery sliced. Stew it tender, and add pepper and salt; and when you serve, add also fried bread.

Soup Maigre

Melt half a pound of butter into a stew-pan, shake it round, and throw in six middling onions sliced. Shake the pan well for two or three minutes; then put to it five heads of celery, two handfuls of spinach, two cabbage-lettuces cut small, and some parsley. Shake the pan well for ten minutes; then put in, two quarts of water, some crusts of bread, a tea-spoonful of beaten pepper, three or four blades of mace; and if you have any white beet leaves, add a large handful of them cut small.
Boil gently an hour. Just before serving, beat-in two yolks of eggs and a large spoonful of vinegar.


Scotch-Leek Soup

Put the water that has boiled a leg of mutton into a stew-pot, with a quantity of chopped leeks, and pepper and salt; simmer them an hour: then mix some oatmeal with a little cold water quite smooth, pour it into the soup, set it on a slow part of the fire, and let it simmer gently; but take care that it does not burn to the bottom.

Onion Soup

Into the water that has boiled a leg or neck of mutton, put carrots, turnips, and (if you have one) a shank-bone, and simmer two hours. Strain it on six onions, first sliced and fried of a light brown; simmer three hours, skim it carefully, and serve. Put into it a little roll, or fried bread.
 
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13,959
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north central florida
#3
April is soon to be upon us, bringing a welcomed respite from the harsh cruelties of the winter we have just endured. Some days the weather will be nice, lulling us to our outdoor cooking; while other days might be cold and rainy. On the cooler, damper days of Spring, we offer the following Soup recipes to renew your spirit with a hearty meal to warm you to your toes. These recipes are simple to make. It is our desire that you spend a Saturday with your family, preparing and sharing such historical meals. Please ask the Corporal any questions related to these recipes and be sure to let him know that you have tried them!
From “A New System of Domestic Cookery”, by Maria Eliza Ketelby Rundell, 1807.


Vegetable Soup

Pare and slice five or six cucumbers; and add to these the inside of as many cos-lettuces, a sprig or two of mint, two or three onions, some pepper and salt, a pint and a half of young peas, and a little parsley. Put these, with half a pound of fresh butter, into a sauce-pan, to stew in their own liquor, near a gentle fire, half an hour; then pour two quarts of boiling-water to the vegetables, and stew them two hours; rub down a little flour into a tea-cupful of water, boil it with the rest fifteen or twenty minutes, and serve it.
Another way.--Peel and slice six large onions, six potatoes, six carrots, and four turnips; fry them in half a pound of butter, and pour on them four quarts of boiling water. Toast a crust of bread as brown and hard as possible, but do not burn it; put that, some celery, sweet herbs, white pepper, and salt, to the above; stew it all gently four hours, then strain it through a coarse cloth: have ready sliced carrot, celery, and a little turnip, and add to your liking; and stew them tender in the soup. If approved, you may add an anchovy, and a spoonful of ketchup.


Soup A-la-Sap

Boil half a pound of grated potatoes, a pound of beef sliced thin, a pint of grey peas, an onion, and three ounces of rice, in six pints of water, to five; strain it through a colander; then pulp the peas to it, and turn it into a sauce-pan again with two heads of celery sliced. Stew it tender, and add pepper and salt; and when you serve, add also fried bread.

Soup Maigre

Melt half a pound of butter into a stew-pan, shake it round, and throw in six middling onions sliced. Shake the pan well for two or three minutes; then put to it five heads of celery, two handfuls of spinach, two cabbage-lettuces cut small, and some parsley. Shake the pan well for ten minutes; then put in, two quarts of water, some crusts of bread, a tea-spoonful of beaten pepper, three or four blades of mace; and if you have any white beet leaves, add a large handful of them cut small.
Boil gently an hour. Just before serving, beat-in two yolks of eggs and a large spoonful of vinegar.


Scotch-Leek Soup

Put the water that has boiled a leg of mutton into a stew-pot, with a quantity of chopped leeks, and pepper and salt; simmer them an hour: then mix some oatmeal with a little cold water quite smooth, pour it into the soup, set it on a slow part of the fire, and let it simmer gently; but take care that it does not burn to the bottom.

Onion Soup

Into the water that has boiled a leg or neck of mutton, put carrots, turnips, and (if you have one) a shank-bone, and simmer two hours. Strain it on six onions, first sliced and fried of a light brown; simmer three hours, skim it carefully, and serve. Put into it a little roll, or fried bread.
That soup looks real good.soup and homemade bread is hard to beat.
 

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